RO recommendations

I have a drilled well that I draw water from. Testing by the state and FHA/VA blessed labs show no pathogenic bacteria but I still installed a UV sterilizer because due to physical considerations my well (although legal) is closer to septic systems than I'd like. I'd like to install a single RO filter for odor and salt removal. This RO filter's output would then supply bathrooms (5 sinks), drinking water faucet only at 3 kitchen sinks, theater sink (1), bar sinks (2), and icemakers (3). I don't want 14 point of use filters. Plumbing to these locations is not a problem.
The remainder of the house (higher consumption loads) would not have RO filtered water.
I have a room in which my pressure tanks, water softener, pH adjuster, UV sterilizer, water heater and furnace are installed. I'd like to install this RO filter in the same room to facilitate maintenance.
Any suggestions as to which brands to consider?
Thanks, Boden
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An RO is a good idea no matter what your situation is as they remove nearly everything from your drinking water. Keep in mind that they tend to make water acidic and this can have negative effects on metal pipes. Use plastic lines.
The first thing you need to do is decide on how many gallons of water per day that you will require for these 14 locations. Add it all up and if it is over 50 gallons per day, you should probably consider a REO Pure brand RO. They make systems that provide from 75 to 850 gallons per day. You will need to supply your own storage tank though.
If you're under 50 gallons per day, just get one of the new generic TFC ROs out there. I've seen them for as little as $170.
Check out http://www.watervalue.com/ro.html . You can get a quote from them on a high capacity REO Pure.
DocWater

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An RO should not be used for odor removal. The odor should be identified and then treated on a POE (point of entry) basis so as to treat all the water used in the building. That would be done ahead of the UV.
If I'm understanding you correctly, you want the cold water at the bathroom sinks to be treated, correct? I don't support that decision. First, it will require a large RO and storage tank with repressurization pump; all with a heavier price tag than needed. Second, RO water should not be run though copper/galvanized etc. tubing/pipe or most metal fixtures. If it is, the metals will be damaged (eaten up quickly) and added to the water, which is a health concern. The drinking water faucets and icemakers (metal types excluded) is a good idea.

Hopefully the AN filter is ahead of the softener and the UV is the last online. Your odor control probably should be done after the AN filter but it depend on what causes the odor.

No regular household type RO is going to do this job as it's designed. You either need 'whole house' type RO (a couple thousand dollars) or a redesign of the job to be done. My advice would be drinking water faucets at all sinks and utility water from the existing equipment feeding the sinks. Or said another way, RO water to only the RO drinking water faucets where needed. The best design for the RO may be to divide the building into parts and use 2-3 regular large output ROs instead of one. And I probably would include premate pumps.
Gary Quality Water Associates

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