Rheems Waterheater leaking (brand new)

Hello,
I had a Rheems 50 gallon electric water heater put in 2 weeks ago to replace i broken one. In the last 2 weeks I have discovered that it is leaking out the relief valve. The temperatures are set at 110, so it shouldn't be a problem with the water being to hot. I talked with the people who put it in for me, and they said I might need an expansion tank put in. I wanted to ask some of your opinions, because I didn't have an expansion tank on before. I can't understand why I would need one now. Is it normal nowadays to have to have one of these put in? Or is there something else I should be looking at? Any help would be appreciated!
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Spider717 wrote:

Was anything else changed or added to, like maybe a supply side pressure reducer installed where there wasn't one before?
Jeff
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Nope, just the water heater

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Spider717 wrote:

If you have any device that would prevent a back flow out of your home, and I believe that would include pressure reduction devices, the expansion tank is likely needed.
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Joseph Meehan

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Relief valves can be defective new
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m Ransley wrote:

I agree with that. I should have noted that as well.
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Verify the temp with a thermometer, as you indicate nothing was changed so try opening the relief valve a few times , maybe some dirt got logged in it . Id try a new one before doing anything else.
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Buy a $ 6 garden hose pressure valve at HD and attach it to an outdoor faucet. That will give you a pressure reading when your water heater kicks in.
I have a pressure regulator that prevents excessive pressure from venting into the street supply. Even at that, the pressure rises only from 50 lbs to 80 lbs in my house (street pressure is 125 lbs). No expansion tank needed.
Walter The Happy Iconoclast www.rationality.net

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You don't need one now. Have them come out and fix the problem. That's was a warranty is for. Relief valves can be bad, have gunk in the seals, etc. Tell them to replace it.
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On Thu, 31 Mar 2005 19:12:00 -0500, "Spider717"
My new 40 gal. Rheem did the same thing. The plumber replaced the relief valve.
J
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sligojoe snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Joseph Meehan) says...

We all know how far "should" gets you.
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(MTLnews) says...

You must be buying very high quality to find 80% that don't leak. My experience is more like 80% *will* leak if you open them once.
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(Spider717) says...

Some overly conscientious type probably decided to test the relief valve. Once they open, they never seat properly again. Try replacing it before you do anything else, and this time don't let anybody lift the lever.
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Larry Caldwell wrote:

That is more likely to happen with an old water heater. This one was only a few weeks old. A new valve or one that has been tested regularly should not leak.
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That may be true on older valves that have never been tested for at least 2 to 5 years (depending on area and water quality). However a brand new valve or one checked regularly, should always reseat and seal properly assuming you aren't bordering it's pressure limits. If it doesn't reseal and you are within it's pressure limits, then it is defintely a defect. I've been unlucky in the last 10 tanks I installed, and 2 out of 10 valves were defective. It happens, and really not too difficult to replace...
After 15 years, I finally have to replace the relief valve on my heating system (electric boiler - with circulation pumps). I check it every year before powering it up (to make sure it is not stuck or blocked), and this year, it decided it no longer wanted to seat properly. So it has a small leak.. No biggie, but I'll probably have to replace it before next heating season...
Good Luck...

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