Replacing windows during the winter???

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Hi all,
I need some advice. I should have done this sooner but just thought about it.
I just signed a contract to have my windows replaced. I spent all summer researching windows and also changing my mind a billion times about what options I wanted. So, it's now mid-November and I finally got it all figured out and signed a contract. I live in New Jersey. The job will start within approximately 8 weeks. (It's a fairly big job cuz it's an old house and there will be different windows/options, even the front door). Anyway, 8 weeks would mean this will be done sometime around early January - middle of winter. Now I think maybe that's a stupid thing. I've never owned a house before so I don't know what I'm doing. Is it stupid to have this done in the winter? I mean, aside from the house getting cold and the inconvenience, is there something else I should know? Like, might there be installation issues or problems that only occur when installing in the winter that don't occur in the warmer months? Anything I should be looking out for???
Thanks.
New-to-home-ownership.
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Girlygirl wrote:

Hi, Not a problem. I am in Calgary, Alberta(cold in winter). They do that sort of thing in winter all the time. They know what they are doing. Just make sure your contractor is experienced reputable one.
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Hey, thanks for that. My contractor is experienced. I was nervous cuz I notice most people get them done in the Spring and I thought that, aside from the obvious, maybe there was some other reason I didn't know about. I feel better now. Thanks! :)
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Do you want bugs or cold?
Seriously I'm in NJ and had a bunch of windows replaced in the winter. Close the door to each room as they do it if it bothers you. They only have the opening open for 5 or 10 minutes at a time.
You'll make up the heat you lose with the new windows.
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wrote:

Thanks Jersey guy!! And, guess what!? I HATE BUGS!! But I looove winter. So I guess I'm doing the right thing! :)
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...

Nope, just wear a sweater.
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The caulking could be a problem. The caulk should be allowed to dry instead of freeze. It may not adhere as good as it would in the summer.
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On Nov 10, 12:35 am, snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

I am in the same boat. The caulk is a BIG issue. It stands between you and leakage for 30 years; you do not want it compromised. I am insisting that they only do the install when the air is 50 or above.
Alternatively, ask to see the caulk tube and read the temperature range in which it is to be installed.
DPA
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wrote:

Any other materials that would work just as well and perform better in freezing temperatures?
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Caulk is not a big issue. Most oil based caulks (one part urethane and polyurethane) are oil based and can be applied in any weather. Check out OSI quad for example. Says right on the installation instructions "will not freeze". Latex caulks cannot be applied in freezing weather, but they shouldn't be using latex caulks anyway.
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Be sure the installer is good and doesnt rush the job as to Plumb, Level , and Square. Most companies have a 1/8" limit as to how far out of of measurement this can be or all warranty is void. My instaler screwed up and several had to be redone.
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Ask yourself 2 questions:
1 - If you were doing it yourself, would you be more relaxed and comfortable on a sunny 70 degree day or on a dreary 20 degree day?
2 - When are you apt to do a better job...on a warm, sunny day when you're relaxed and comfortable or when you're hating life 'cuz your fingers are stiff, a frigid wind is blowing in your face and you're bundled up in a jacket and hat?
Attitude has as much to do with a good installation as does the quality of the materials and the skill of the worker.
Why not see if you can reschedule for early spring when any cold weather issues, perceived or actual, simply wouldn't exist?
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on 11/10/2007 10:22 AM DerbyDad03 said the following:

She's not going to do it herself. The contractors are going to dress warmly. I have done outside contracting work when it was snowing or freezing rain was falling, or had fallen. I have had to broom the snow off floor joists to be able to walk on them. You're probably going to get a job done sooner when it is off season work. In warm weather you'll probably get put on a list and have to wait.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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re: She's not going to do it herself.
Never said she was, never implied she was. My post was about attitude.
Anybody that's done a fair amount of construction/remodeling/repair work has probably worked in less than favorable conditions. Did you enjoy walking on snow covered floor joists or would you have rather it been 70, sunny and dry? Do you think its possible that you might not have noticed something or done something due to the distraction of the snow and bad weather?
I just came in from raking the leaves on a damp and chilly November afternoon. Had it been nicer, I would have stayed out longer and probably done a better job. Due to the weather, I did a "good enough" job. Do I want my windows installed "good enough" or do I want a contractor that is in a good mood, enjoying life and more apt to notice the little things like a piece of trim out of place or a section of caulk that could be fixed, but doesn't really have to be?
She already has a contract, which should give her a little priority with the contractor, so it can't hurt to make the phone call and ask if she can be rescheduled. It's obvious from the OP's statements that time is not of the essence. As I said before, if the job is done in the spring, any cold weather issues, perceived or actual, simply wouldn't exist.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Hi, Sounds like in cold winter life has to come to grinding halt? Where I am winter can be cold like -30F. There is a saying work done winter time is better than done in humid hot summer. Building sun rooms, replacing windows for the whole house, stuff like that goes year round. My neighbor just havd all windows on his house replaced last week. Why should she have to suffer cold draft and energy waste for another winter? And there is warranty. Good windows these days come with at least 10 year warranty against leak and/or defects.
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on 11/10/2007 11:52 AM DerbyDad03 said the following:

Sure, but the Winter money was just as good as in the Spring, Summer, and Fall.

No. In warm weather, there are just as many distractions, maybe more. No one is standing around doing nothing when it is cold.

I do a lot of physical work when it is very cold out. I dress in layers, including my legs, but after a while, I start sweating and the outer clothing layers start coming off. Maybe it is because I was born in December, and in the NE US, and have lived in the NE all of my 70 years. I'd rather work when it is 40F out rather than 99F.

Why do you assume that people who are working in inclement weather are in a bad mood, or careless, or inattentive? Maybe they are in a better mood because they are getting paid, rather than being laid off for the winter. Skiers, snow boarders, and snowmobile riders are certainly in a good mood, and careful, and attentive.

Well, you're not going to do the job, and others may not have the same aversions to working in the cold.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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I got my siding installed in the winter. I had hired a contractor I use all the time and has always done good work for that and other work. I was flexible; I would have happily waited until spring, but he and his crew wanted to get the job done.
Amazed me - but they dressed warm; I did some snow shovelling around the house but they kept it clear too, and it got done.
Windows would present a problem of cold air coming in in the process of installation; but that can be held to a minimum unless problems are discovered. I don't see an issue. Not with the job; not with worker attitude.
Banty
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I work as a contractor in the upper midwest. We always fight a perception that work can't be done outside in the winter. This is just not true. I have framed houses, changed windows, built decks, etc in all months of the year, and scoff at the notion that quality suffers. Frankly, I would take a 10 degree day over a 90 degree humid day hands down. I am not exaggerating. People just don't realize that you can dress for cold and your body acclimates. If you feel cold, hypothermic, hands numb, etc. then you are not dressed right. If your contractor says he can change windows in the winter, then trust that he knows what he is doing and go for it.
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What I find interesting is that I said "ask for early spring" and a number of you have come back saying you'd rather work in the cold than in humid, 90 degree weather. You'd get no argument out of me on that one! :-)
However, if I understand the OP's post correctly, she's has some questions (concerns?) about her choice of a mid-winter installation, and has already taken a considerable amount of time scheduling the job, so I still see no reason not to ask for a delay until spring if it will eliminate her concerns.
I mean no disrepect to any one who works outside in the winter. Heck, I spent a year in AK and replaced many a runway light and repaired cables cut by the snowplows during the dead of winter. That said, given the choice, I would have rather done the work in April instead of February.
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says...

I just re-read the original post, and all she wants to know is if replacing windows in the wintertime is a reasonable thing - if there are any special concerns.
I think the answer is - no.
I asked if the siding job would be delayed until the spring, but that was based on the kind of attitude marson was talking about. I just didnt' know it was no big deal to do this in the winter weather (I'm in upstate New York, by the way).
My contractor said it was no big deal; after some years and quite a few jobs I trust him; the siding job got done.

Sure. But no reason for her to wait. If *she* had a reason to wait, it would be different. But it's not that - she just wants to know if the job can really be done well in the wintertime.
Banty
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