replacing a washing machine timer

Just about every washing machine I've ever owned has gone through a period where it won't advance through the cycles unless you manually spin the timer. It's always cost me roughly $150 for parts and labor. Well it's going on again with my Kenmore. Is this a simple remove and replace that I can do myself?
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Mark - go to www.repairclinic.com, type in your model #, and you will be able to get your timer.... usually for about 20% less then what sears will charge.
Also, you might want to post more info (model #, other symptoms) here, to make sure it's not something else causing the timer to not advance. There is an appliance guy here named Jeff who will help ya out.
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Mark Corbelli wrote:

Hi,
Probably...but unknown as no model# posted...Kenmore is made by several different companies.
http://www.applianceaid.com/model.html Some model# helps.

That's about average!
Some Whirlpool built Kenmore timers.... http://store.yahoo.com/cgi-bin/clink?a-1appliance+tSwkBf+whirwastim.html Look on the back of your old timer as they often put the part# there.
jeff. Appliance Repair Aid http://www.applianceaid.com /
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Mark wrote:

When you lift > the lid, the water is pumped out but the clothes are wet. If you close

A bad timer is very possible.
Still no model#, but if you have a Whirlpool built direct drive Kenmore, most will...A copy:
**Inglis, Whirlpool, Kenmore Direct drive washers: This machine is a forward/reversing style of washer. The motor drives one direction to wash, stops, reverses and goes the other direction to spin and pump. The timer is responsible for cycling the motor back and forth. As the "direct drive" name indicates, there is no belt on this machine, but it has a coupler between the motor and the gear box. Most ( not all ) direct drive washers are a neutral drain washer, means the timer allows the washer to pump out the water and then the timer pauses ( stops ) the washer so the neutral drive in the gearbox can reset for spinning, and when the timer allows the washer to start back up again the pumping will continue and spinning will occur. You should be able to see the pauses on the washer wiring diagram flow chart.**
If the "pause" is missing, the timer is likely bad. If the pause is there but no spin, the gear box neatral drain may be lazy and bad on entering the spin mode.
jeff. Appliance Repair Aid http://www.applianceaid.com /
Appliance Repair Aid wrote:

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There is a pause between the initial wash and the pump cycle. As far as a pause between the last pump cycle and the spin, I have no way of knowing. If the timer is at least $100, I may as well let my handy repairman do it as he ususally get me for $150. It would be worth $50 to make sure it's done right. The washer is a "70" series and the model # is 11020712991
Mark
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Hi,
Comes up around $87.00
http://www.pcappliancerepair.com/cgi-bin/promote-detail.cgi?affiliate_id=AppAid&itemf1636&brand=WPL Timer Assembly - 110.20712991
jeff.
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yes
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Marcus

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Mark,
You can generally assume that you are going to pay a serviceman roughly twice what it would cost you to replace a timer yourself. The pro has a right to a legitimate profit if you hire him; you have a right to save money if you are reasonably handy.
Replacing the timer in just about any home appliance is rather trivial. But you have to be good at diagnosing your problem because you aren't likely to find a parts dealer who will let you return an electrical part. This is very reasonable, because too many amateurs are capable of ruining the new electrical part and attempting to return it as "defective."
The manufacturers build most timers in a manner which make them rather difficult to work on. Still, many timers can be repaired by a good DIY homeowner. I've had extremely good luck with dryer times, about 50% luck with washing machine timers and very poor luck repairing dishwasher timers. Even if you aren't brave enough to try fixing one, I'd recommend tearing apart any timer that you have replaced so that you can determine how complex it is, whether you can locate its problems, and whether you could repair & reassemble it. It develops self-sufficiency skills - which may be very important if the timer that you need is no longer manufactured.
If I determine that the timer is the problem with an appliance, then I'm going to remove the timer. If I'm too busy to mess with attempting to fix the timer, then I take it to the parts dealer along with a serial number and model number from the appliance. If I've got the time to try fixing the old timer, then I've already removed it and I can do my experimenting on the old timer before making that trip to the parts dealer. Nothing is lost except for a half hour or so of tinkering. Sometimes the fix is nothing more than using an emery board and then sandpaper to restore a set of burnt contacts.
I strongly recommend working on your own appliances if at all possible. Your lifetime savings will be considerable. Plus you will feel less vulnerable when you do call in a pro and he recommends expensive repairs.
To make your timers last longer: Periodically warn everybody in the house that you will break their fingers if you catch them turning an appliance timer knob counter-clockwise.
Gideon
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