Repairing Superglue on Black Plastic

Fixing a shiny black plastic handle with gorilla-brand superglue, I made a sloppy mess of it. It leaked out of the joint and over the surface. Is there a solvent that will not destroy the plastic but will remove that haze? Or must I just reduce the haze with some other solvent or glaze to at least make it bumpy, but as shiny as before? Or at least shinier than it is ow
Any ideas?
TIA!!
Mark
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Unfortunately, many adhesives are also solvents. What you see is probably less adhesive than surface damage. (Gorilla Glue is not a super-glue (cyanoacrylate). It's a polyurethane adhesive, I believe.)
You might try buffing the surface with Novus plastic polish.
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William Sommerwerck wrote the following:

Gorilla also has a CA glue.
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Bill
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If the OP used a CA adhesive, then he used far too much of it, if it oozed out the edge. With most adhesives, less = better.
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I've read that with superglue/CA glue,you only need a drop or two,it's actually counterproductive to coat the entire joint.
Now,the polyurethane glues(for woodworking)are designed to foam up and expand.
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Jim Yanik
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gmark wrote the following:

Some plastics can handle acetone (nail polish remover) which is used to remove CA glue The last resort is sanding it off.
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gmark wrote:

How much work do you want to do?
1. Sand smooth with fine paper
2. Wet sand with a couple of grits up to, say, 600-1000
3. Polish with micro-polishers. Those are usually liquid with very, very fine aluminum oxide suspended and are usually available at auto supply stores. You can power polish but lightly and slowly. You can also do it by hand with a rag, not hard.
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dadiOH
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You can do what Dadi said(best way) or sand smooth and then spray paint.
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On 10/19/2010 2:57 PM, gmark wrote:

Gorilla glue just does that, it takes experience to apply a small enough amount to prevent it. It's one of the reasons I don't like it that much. Dried polyurethane is a tough one to remove- I'd simply sand it off then use finer and finer paper down to 600-100 grit and finally plastic polish or auto rubbing compound. Paint remover may work but is liely to attack plastic.
I don't think you're seeing solvent damage with that particular glue- I've found the "overflow" relatively easy to scrape/sand away.
John H.
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HagstAr wrote the following:

Read the subject line again.
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On 10/19/2010 11:27 PM, willshak wrote:

That's pointless as Gorilla doesn't make a "superglue".
John H.
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I said that quite a few posts back, and someone responded that it did. I just checked, and Gorilla does, indeed, have a cyanocrylate product.
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Well I stand corrected- I asked at the woodworking store and they'd never heard of such a thing.
John H.
On 10/23/2010 10:18 AM, William Sommerwerck wrote:

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You gotta get out more, John. We even have it here in Vieques!
-Bill
HagstAr wrote:

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On 10/23/2010 6:58 PM, Bill M wrote:

IS there a glue for plastic where overflow won't damage the surface? ...Something like Elmer's where you can just wipe away the excess without having it destroy the surrounding area.
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In theory, you're supposed to restrain yourself and apply "a little dab". This is easier said than done.
Most (not all) plastic adhesives are solvents, and an overflow is likely to damage what it touches. Two-part adhesives are probably less likely to do damage.
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William Sommerwerck wrote:

Rule of thumb is likely that if its easy to clean up then it probably doesn't make a good bond.
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