Repairing a screen door

I'm at my parents' house this week, clearing fences, doing repairs and stuff. The last thing on my list is fixing the torn screen door.
The old screen is aluminum (probably purchased a long time ago), and appears to be installed with 0.160" spline. I am going to be using fiberglass screening because it is more tear resistant.
Will I need .160 spline, or .175 since the fiberglass material is thinner? Or does it even matter?
How tight do I stretch the screen before I spline it? (I assume I just lay it flat with no wrinkles, and no tension until I do the 3rd and 4th sides)
Thanks, Bob
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wrote:

right.
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On Monday, September 15, 2014 8:32:31 PM UTC-5, zxcvbob wrote:

en is aluminum (probably purchased a long time ago), and appears to be inst alled with 0.160" spline. I am going to be using fiberglass screening becau se it is more tear resistant. Will I need .160 spline, or .175 since the fi berglass material is thinner? Or does it even matter? How tight do I stretc h the screen before I spline it? (I assume I just lay it flat with no wrink les, and no tension until I do the 3rd and 4th sides) Thanks, Bob
If you already have the .16 spine material try it and see how it feels. If the new screening is truly thinner, then the .175 material should be the w inner. All three sides after the first need to be stretched tight, even th e second one. If you do not tension it, you may have a sag at the corner w here the first two spines are installed.
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On 9/15/2014 9:13 PM, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

Right. Pull it taut while doing 2nd side...
I'll stop by HD tomorrow and buy a bag of .175" just in case I need it. I can try a piece of the old spline with the new material to get a better idea which size I really need, and take one of the unopened bags back. Even if I screw up and open the wrong package I'll be prepared.
I'm planning to screen it while it's still hung -- Go down one side and then cut the spline. Start again in the same corner with a new spline and go across the top, down the side, and finish up with the bottom. That seems to be the order where gravity will fight me the least.
Thanks again, Bob
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On Monday, September 15, 2014 8:32:31 PM UTC-5, zxcvbob wrote:

screen is aluminum (probably purchased a long time ago), and appears to be installed with 0.160" spline. I am going to be using fiberglass screening because it is more tear resistant. Will I need .160 spline, or .175 since the fiberglass material is thinner? Or does it even matter? How tight do I stretch the screen before I spline it? (I assume I just lay it flat with no wrinkles, and no tension until I do the 3rd and 4th sides) Thanks, Bob
When I bought this house 20 years ago, the aluminum screen door was basically OK but stained. It also had some holes, and one of those pet guards at the bottom, and the closer wasn't working properly.
I took it off, removed the old screen and pet guard (no pets or little kids here), sanded it down and painted it the same color as the house trim. Replaced with fiberglass and new spline (matched the size with the old one). I didn't see the need for a closer, so just hung it back without one.
Stretched the screen just enough to get the wrinkles out and not super tight.
Has been great - no sagging. No problem closing the screen door by hand instead of a spring, etc.
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You can...
1. use small (1") pieces of spline to hold it up
2. use masking tape to do the same thing
--

dadiOH
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