Repair leak in PVC toilet elbow

I noticed wet spots in the living room ceiling which eventually got darker. I cut open a 1 foot square into the sheet rock ceiling and sure enough, when we flushed the water gushed out of the joint.
Diagram: @ <- toilet - - <- floor L*--- <- PVC elbow & drain pipe (* location of leak) -- ---- <- Living room ceiling (w/ cutout)
It seems that I would have to take the toilet bowl out, to get to the top of the elbow; and at the the leak side, I would have to cut a piece of the straight PVC.
There has to be an easier way...can I "patch" the leak point? Any suggestions would be appreciated.
Jerry
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Jerry McConnell wrote:

Depends on how much assurance you want it won't leak again.
You *could* swab more PVC glue in the suspected leak area. Heat the joint with a hair dryer to drive all the water out first. Silicone sealant works well too if you can force it in the gap.
Otherwise, pull the toilet, then unbolt the flange from the floor. Saw the pipe from below. It will now be too short to reach into a new EL for glueing. I would use a FERNCO "no-hub" coupling (rubber with stainless band) to connect the old pipe to a new "street EL". (You could also glue this using a coupling but I think it will be more difficult up in the ceiling.)
If you decide to re-do it, go out and buy some fittings so you can see what you must do.
Jim
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Thanks for your input Speedy Jim---I think, as u suggest, that the best way is pulling the bowl...
Regards
Jerry
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<< There has to be an easier way...can I "patch" the leak point? >>
Had a similar situation back in 1976. Cleaned off the affected leak area (a "dry" joint not enough solvent cement) sanded it lightly and dried thoroughly. Applied 1" fiberglass tape and epoxy 2 part mix for several inches on both sides of the fault with about four layers IIRC, and let it cure solid. Resulting repair probably solider than a solvent joint. Absolutely no leaks at all since then. Time invested, maybe an hour, since it was handy to get at in the basement. Any boat shop will have the right resins, and polyesters will probably work as well as epoxies and are cheaper, too. HTH
Joe
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