Removing Thick Wallpaper Paste

Old house that had some wallpaper boarder up. No sizing. Removed tediously. Paste caked on thick. Wall has a texture. Paste filled in the texture. I can probably make it not very noticable between feather edge sanding, priming, etc.
Can wallpaper paste removers disolve this off or is that basically for thin residuals? Any personal experience with a particular one worked out good?
Have a look-see here for a rough idea of it:
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On plaster you can scrub with a "greenie" or something harsher. On drywall I would not use anything heavier that a "whitey". In both of those case I am referring to the scouring pads that are used in kitchens. 3M is one brand.
Warm water with a little vinegar will work as well as anything you can buy. Change you rinse water VERY often.
Colbyt
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Scrubbing with a greenie and warm water is in the plan. Got a shitload (specific unit of measurement back in VT) of them. Thanks for the vinegar tip Colbyt.
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I have successfully use a "black" (very coarse) 3M pad designed for BBQ cleaning. It came with a handle. If the plaster or drywall has a good coat of paint, wetting it with water with a cap full of detergent and a 1/2 cup of ammonia then gently scrubbing to get the softened crud off the wall, rinse the 3M pad frequently, and change the water often.
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Red Green wrote:

scrape or scrub with rag and warm water. I've never used anything more than water and household cleaner. I doubt the chemical removers are much better than plain water.
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I agree, all paste is water soluable. All the removers are is typically a bit of soap to help wet the surface and retard evaporation. Keep scrubbing and it will eventially come off if it was applied over plaster or paint. If it was directly onto drywall mud or paper then you might as well sand and paint or skim it over with new mud.
Be careful applying mud over wallpaper. If it wants to come off it will due to the moisture in the mud, you could end up with a big mess and self stripping walls.
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Fortunately it's not right over drywall. Over paint.

All paper is off but I've been down the road you speak of. Someone painted over wallpaper and it was a mess. Tried mudding over to smooth and learned about the bigger mess you speak of. Then learned about priming with oil base primer first.
Thanks for the reply.
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clipped

wallpaper. The wallpaper started coming off the wall, but she fought back :o) Pressed it back on until it started to dry again.
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I've done a bit of wallpaper removal. Separate surface from the backing then, as you, just warm water, soak and peel.
The first time I did it I bought some remover. Ran out in short time. Man this is gonna get expensive. Figured I'd just try warm water and finish the area I was working on then go get some more remover. Went just as "easy" (ughhh!) as with the remover. Water only ever since.
Thanks for the reply.
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wrote:

If warm water works too slowly for you, rent a wallpaper steamer, it works great for removing thick paste residue. Just steam an area for 10-15 seconds or so and scrape off with a plastic wide knife. Then finish up with a clean warm water washdown.
I had several rooms and hallways that had paper over bare drywall (not primed or painted). The steamer allowed me to get the paper and paste off without totally trashing the drywall. The steam softened the drywall paper facing, but after it dried out, it was fine.
Or for not much more than rental cost, you can buy a Wagner steamer, which, unlike their painting machines, actually works pretty well, especially if you don't have a huge area to do.
HTH,
Paul F.
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lol!
However...I have always 4" brushed houses. Never sprayed anything except from cans. The HUD wreck I have now had just too much overall surface area, raised contour, large carport ceiling and wide soffit. Needed both priming & painting. I took a chance and got a 2800 psi Wagner Paint Crew. $200-50 rebate.
It worked excellent. Didn't paint in hot weather or direct sun. Never let tip dry out. Always kept a bucket of water nearby. When putting the head down for anything more than a few minutes, I'd toss it in the bucket. Tip did not clog once. Cleaned just the head of the gun daily and overnight I'd cover the supply tray with plastic wrap and cover. Paint never skinned.
The only PITA was no swival between the head and hose but for 150 that'd be like asking for a voice controled console in a Vega. Paid for itself in one use in my case and opinion - the sprayer, not the Vega.
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