Removing Chain-Link Fence and posts

Hello,
I bought a house that has a chain link fence only on one side of the back yard.. I discovered that this is actually my neighbors "former" fence but they built a wooden fence on their side of it.
Now, there are tons of large weeds that grow between their wooden fence and the old chain link that can't be accessed. I would like to remove the chain link fence and just use the back of their wooden fence as the common separation.
With his permission, of course, what is the best way to remove those posts? I can cut the chain link off, but the posts seem to be pretty solid. Should they just be dug up, or cut at the base?
Thoughts? Experiences?
ER
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you go messing around with the posts of the chain link it's going to damage the wood fence. Ask him and if OK remove the chain link and then you can get to the weeds.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

find someone who wants a section of chain link fence that long and tell them they can have it if they can get it out without damaging the wood fence
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
EggRaid wrote:

Don't dig, don't cut, use a post puller. This is just a long rod with a fixture that hooks on the post and a support that gives high leverage. You can of course just use pipe and chain and a couple of short 10x10" timbers, but it is more cumbersome. An alternative is one of those hi lift jacks that many people buy for their pickup or farm machinery. You just jack the post and cement out of the ground. When you get the out, a few whacks will reduce the cement to manageable size and then you do whatever you want with the post (sell to the recycler?).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don't forget to soak the ground before you pull the posts wiggle them as much as possible metal posts are usually not in that deep. You may even want to try one of those deep root waterers they have to get the ground soaked deep at the bottom 2' is the usual depth form the ones that I have seen.
Wayne

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If the posts are concreted in the ground, (I did that in my dog run to prevent him from digging the posts down, you can cut the posts off as low as possible, then put a little topsoil over the area and turn it into a planter bed or seed it with grass.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Why don't you just use a Sawzall? If the concrete is above the surface, you might try a sledge hammer to break them up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Last summer I helped my neighbor remove chain link between our properties. He cut the posts off a few inches below grade using an angle grinder with cutting disk. Very easy and quick. A couple of old posts were in the way of the new vinyl fence posts and had to be dug up. He dug around as much as possible and soaked with water then pulled them up with chain attached to an ATV.
Kevin

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Best and quickest idea right there!
Sawzall is the next best!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<< With his permission, of course, what is the best way to remove those posts?

Go to any farm store and buy a post puller and chain (if one doesn't come with it. Something sturdy to put under the puller base would be helpful. Online sources are Northern Tool and Harbor Freight for price references and you might find one on eBay. Rental tool places are also a possibility, but sometimes the time needed for the project makes the tool rental a high proportion of the purchase price and besides you could always sell it oneBay when you'e done with it. Most pullers will even yank a concrete embedded post out of the ground. Be sure to consider your disposal system if your garbage haulers have special regulations. Good luck.
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How are the posts installed? If their set in concrete and in very close proximity to the new fence, removal would be difficult. Another factor is the clearance between the cement base and the bottom of the fence. Your neighbor may be able to provide details on the depth of the pour, etc if he did the job himself (or watched the process).
The easiest solution would be to cut the posts as low as possible and bury them. As others have suggested, an angle grinder or Sawz-All should make short work of the posts without damaging the neighbor's new fence.
mark __________________________ Mark Cato snipped-for-privacy@andrew.cmu.edu
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Sheepherder's jack, sometimes called a fancepost jack.
Jeff
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks to everyone for the suggestions!
ER

and
chain
posts?
Should
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Please follow up and let us know what you used, and how it worked.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Dig out the posts. A come-along or wench may make be good tools to use.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's not good since the fences are close together.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Phisherman wrote:

Huh? What did you say a wench would be good for?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.