Refrigerator not working again

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On Tue, 21 Sep 2010 15:18:40 -0500, Ignoramus25344

Many people can fix almost anything in their home, but when it comes to refrigeration, it's not a DIY repair. You already replaced the capacitor and relay. About the only other thing a homeowner can fix is a defective control, bad wiring, or the cooling fan underneath. After that, it's time for the pros, and they are expensive. You can likely buy a used fridge much cheaper than the repair. Once a compressor dies, its just too costly to replace it. A friend just had a chest freezer die. I went over and tested the relay. It was sucking way too much amperage, and would cut out in seconds. I told him the compressor was shot. He called the pros the next day. He paid them $50 for the same advice I gave him. They said there is a dead short inside the compressor windings, and the cost to replace the compressor was around $350 more. He was pissed he had to pay the $50 service call. Well, I told him, and I didn't charge him anything. He just bought a used freezer for $125, but lost all the food that he had.
It sounds like you did all you could. Kiss it goodbye and get another fridge, unless you want to spend as much as a new fridge to replace the compressor.
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Well, not what I really like to hear, but this may be very pertinent.
Last night, after the fridge sat without electricity (and food) for over 12 hours, it still would not start -- the motor would buzz and then the overload relay would turn it off. I left it unplugged.
Just to be dead sure, I will try again tonight when I get home from work -- that would be 36 hours of sitting without power. I do not expect any different result.
At that point, if the fridge would not start, this is for sure not ANY kind of cooling issue, so I will just replace it with another fridge.
i
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Ig... it's not unreasonable for a new start cap to fail. Electronic parts tend to fail in two regimes -- "infant mortality", and "old age". If they get past four or five months, they usually last for their rated lives.
Also, I think you said you replaced the start relay. If it actually IS a relay (because they call those abominable PTC things "relays", too), then it's easy to tell if it's working. If, instead, you open the thing up and find a coin-sized disk of unobtainium with two leads, it's a PTC thermistor, and prone to all sorts of ills. Replace it with a real potential relay, and you'll lick the problem (if it's failed).
Even a loose connection between the "relay" and the hermet connector on the compressor can cause the symptoms you see.
LLoyd
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On 22-Sep-10 04:18, Ignoramus25344 wrote:

How old is it? Does it have enough room to vent its heat?
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5 years old or so, yes it has room to vent.
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Perhaps, once he has determined that the solution is beyond his ability, of course. Don't be bustin his ass because he's making that effort. Furthermore, we in this group HELP, unlike those responders at alt.hvac Steve

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I was of the same mind until I clocked both old and new with a KillaWatt power meter. The old one (admittedly low on freon so working extra hard) ran 4X the kWh as the new one. That's hard to ignore. I was of the same mind as you - IIABDFI! But when the old one couldn't cool well on the hottest days anymore, I had to make a choice and I chose the simplest model in the hopes that reliability is truly inversely proportional to complexity.
Fridges are like classic cars. After 30 years, the plastic and rubber parts are heading off to Jesus, replacements aren't readily available and the patches accumulate to the point of embarrassment. One thing I like about the new one is the absence of a dimpled egg shelf. Never used it, the space was wasted and it collected all sorts of crap that had to be scooped out one $#$%% egg hole at a time.
The new fridge is much easier to clean overall and has enormous shelves built into each door. Good some ways, bad others. Grabbing creamer, condiments and the ice tea pitcher doesn't require a full door opening, which is a very large energy consumer, especially with teenagers doing a IG-level food inventory before deciding what to eat.
We did make one super-size mistake in selecting the capacity of the units. They allege to be the same cubic capacity, but the new one had it laid out in very much less friendly space. It's our fault (well, mine) because we (I) didn't think to measure the cubic space of each compartment. The new box has much less freezer space and turned out to be a biggish sort of mistake.
But now that the government says the recession is over we'll be leaving it behind when we buy our new, fairly priced, equitably taxed house in a stable neighborhood not riddled with foreclosed and empty houses. Phew!
The fridge compartment is conspicuously empty and the freezer, the reverse. It's laid out so where once we could have containers and frozen food cartons 2 deep, now it's 1.75 deep which basically means one deep. The walls are much thicker as well, but that's part of the reason it's using 1/4 the juice. We had a lot of limitations, though, in terms of getting it IN the house. We have very small doors that limited the overall size of the replacement. The two guys who did the install had to put a ratty look sling under the bottom and literally "dance" it into the house.
Will it last as long as the old box? Probably not. What does? Will I save enough money to offset the cost of buying a new one? No, but if I had replaced it when it first started getting quirky, the savings picture would be different. One thing it inspired me to do was take baseline kWh readings on the new one. Armed with that information, it might be possible to spot a problem as insidious as water-logged insulation. I'll at least have some idea what the current draw was when the machine was well to help gauge the severity of future problem. I'll bet waterlogged insulation can really jack up the kWh consumption per day. Where did the water come from?
-- Bobby G.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/hvac/Refrigerator-not-working-again-42178-.htm Jasprt2 wrote: I had a similar experience - turned out to be the cooling fan motor - not the relay or the compressor.
Same symptom - compressor would start, run for a few then kick off. replaced the fan motor and presto.
If yours does not have a cooling fan, try cleaning the dust from the coils.
Ignoramus25344 wrote:

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