Recommend table saw for hardwood floor installation

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Unless you are in need of the miter and/or compound features of the chop saw, my vote goes for the table saw. You can do many more different cuts with a table saw than with a chop saw.
If you buy a inexpensive saw be sure to buy a good carbide tipped blade for it, it will make all the difference in the world. If it's one of the smaller, table top types of saw, get some cheap roller stands and/or make some provision to support longer pieces.

DJ
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I just found this web site and so this may be of no use to you. I used to have a business installing and refinishing hardwood floors. Your tool needs are of course based on a few criteria. First the type of flooring you will be using. If you are installing the standard tounge and groove strip flooring measuring 2. 1/2" wide by 3/4 inches thick in random lengths then any chop saw will work. If you don't plan to use the tool a lot after this project then I would go for an inexpensive brand and spend the money for a good blade. Freud is a decent brand of blade available at most home improvement stores. An 8 1/4 inch saw will be adequate. Delta makes a good one for less than $100.00. This next issue is where I disagree with most of the answers you seem to have gotten.If the dimensions of your room will require cutting any boards lengthwise (ripping) then you are only safe using a table saw. In addition a table saw will include a miter attatchment which will work just as well to cut any short ends to length or at an angle.If you are installing a plank floor ( board widths greater that 3.5 " then you will have to have a chop saw wth a 10 to 12" blade which is quite a bit more expensive. Here again the table saw will do any width. If you plan to install laminate flooring the table saw again is your best bet. However with laminate flooring you will need to use a blade made for this type of material. These blades have more teeth. Again with the table saw spend less on the saw and more on the blade. A carbide blade is best and a small 10' benchtop saw will do nicely. The saws are also available on-line or from companies like Harbor Frieght Tools or the Tool Crib. The short of it is the same advice I give to any novice woodworker asking what the one most useful cutting tool is. The table saw is the most widely useful tool in woodworking of any kind. If you have any other questions on this matter feel free to e-mail me. snipped-for-privacy@bresnam.net. Also if you opt for my advice invest in a good push block and safety glasses and follow the safety instructions included with the tool. A power saw will not even slow down as your fingers pass through the blade!
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Thanks for your detailed reply. I plan to install standard 3/4" T&G flooring in 3" or 4" widths. So looks like I need to get a 10" miter saw and a smallish table saw.
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Or, a nonish table saw. Or, you don't really need a miter saw. For the few boards you're going to rip, you could easily get them ripped by someone with a table saw and the miter would perform most of the work you'll need to do. On the other hand, my father laid the maple floors in the house I grew up in using only a table saw. You can easily get very precise cross cuts on the table saw and then you don't need the miter. You can spend more money on a betterish table saw that way.
It really comes down to what you want to end up with after the job. If you're going to be doing woodworking then either tool is a good tool to have in your shop, but depending on what kind of projects you envision yourself getting into, one might be a better first tool to have in the long run.
Of course, when faced with a project, there just is no better reason to go out and buy tools. Lots of tools. Hell, buy both saws, but don't buy a smallish table saw. Buy a biggerish table saw.
--

-Mike-
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A non-powered miter jis can get the job done if there is no plan of woodworking afterward. Fringe benefit is excercise.
On 14 Jan 2005 08:42:05 -0800, "Joydeep Buragohain"

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On 13 Jan 2005 18:11:31 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@bresnan.net wrote:

In almost all cases, you have to rip flooring for only one wall of the room you are flooring. So unless you have truly large rooms, the likeli- hood is that you will have to rip a maximum of 30 feet of wood. Buying a table saw for 30' of cuts sounds excessive. If I *were* to buy a tool just for this that would be safest, it would be a band saw anyway. But beyond that, one has the option of finding someone with an existing saw.
Another, which takes a bit of work, but can be done reasonably safely, is to mark the boards, clamp each one on end, saw down to the mark witha sharp manual saw say evey 2 feet or so, then clamp the wood flat down and rip with whatever saw you have and keep reclamping the wood as you move along. I used a heavy conventional circular saw for this, running the flooring strips between two tables with a second strip a few inches away to provide more surface for the base of the saw. If I were to do this now, I would buy a cheap & light 18 volt and use that instead.
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