Question about old heating oil tank

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C'mon, how am I supposed to know that? For all I know it might last another 20 years, or spring a leak right after he buys it. That's just the risk you take when you buy an old house. Am I expected to replace all the old plumbing in the walls as well, before I can sell the goddamn place?
- Logic316
"Some people say that I must be a terrible person, but it's not true. I have the heart of a young boy in a jar on my desk" -- Stephen King
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another
you
Yes, your best bet is to replace everything including the foundation.
--




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On Sun, 2 Nov 2008 18:43:00 -0500, "Logic316"

Its quite obvious you havent sold any homes lately. Living with a realtor, Im quite up on the subject. Most new homebuyers now hire a home inspector for a home they are interested in. Some are incompetent and some are very very thorough. Right down to ungrounded electrical outlets and cracks in walls and foundations that you done even notice. They also know ages and life spans of things like furnaces and air conditioners, etc. There is a good reason for home inspectors and that is because of people like you Logic. Guys like you that futz with all your own chit and patch it together with chewing gum and duct tape. When you sell you get to fill out discloseure forms. If they find out you lie they can come back years later to sue your ass although anyone can sue anyone for anything. Comparing a home sale to a car sale is almost funny. You need a dose or reality logic. Bubba
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bubba you are absiolutely correct. a nearby homeowner sold a house with a bad sewer line, new owner had flood, from sewage backup...
new owener called plumber who said yeah i told old owner main line was bad, not disclosed old owener paid for all new sewer line, wall and yard replacement and new driveway.
new owner didnt care much about costs, old owner poaid thru nose.
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The only thing I would disagree with is that I think the used car analogy has validity. Logic's apparent premise is that there is no advantage to fixing anything until it's completely shot or it's remaining life can be exactly determined. Now if I had a used car to sell, just like a house, there are certain things I'd fix because I know they are going to be important to a prospective buyer. If the car had two front tires that were worn and nearing their end but still met the minimum state inspection reqts, I'd get new ones, because it makes the car easier to sell and you will likely get the money for the 2 tires back and maybe more. And just like with a house, a car with no obvious items sticking out, leaves the buyer with the impression that it's more likely been maintained in some reasonable fashion over time. If the car had floor mats that couldn't been cleaned to look nice, I'd replace those too. Of course you have to do this on a case by case basis, depending on what the value of the car is, etc. But putting $300 into a $5000 car could easily make the car sell quicker and get you the $300 back.
In the case of the oil tank, do we even know how old it is? The fact that people are telling you some insurance companies won't write a policy on a house with a tank over 20 years old should tell you something. I would expect MOST tanks would fail by developing a slow leak, which if caught in time, could be dealt with without having a big problem. But given that a big problem could be tens of thousands of dollars, why take that risk? Suppose it leaks just 5 gallons into the basement. How easy do you think it's going to be to get the smell out, so that some prospective buyer doesn't start investigating what it's all about?
So, I think the answer is determine it's age as best you can and either replace it because it's old and prudent to do so or have a pan ready and ride it till it starts leaking oil.
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Yes, however It would be very expensive.

No, no tricks.

I do not belive so.
-zero

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I acquired a used air compressor tank that I wanted to verify was safe. I talked to the "boiler and pressure vessel" inspector for the city, who volunteered to drop by and checked multiple locations on the tank for thickness using a handheld ultrasonic thickness guage. So yes, it should be possible. Finding the tool, or someone to do it might be a problem.
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in the case of a home sale they will want a certified guaranteed inspection.
no doubt that will cost more than a new tank
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Sure. Shove a bar of soap up your ass. When you fart, bubbles will form.
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Sure. Shove a bar of soap up your ass. When you fart, bubbles will form.
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Can I liquify the bubbles and use them for fuel? Really, I'm strapped for cash here...
- Logic316
"Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get."
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Is the outside rusty? I would think that the inside would not rust very fast, since part of the time it is immersed in fuel oil, and the rest of the time the air inside is pretty stagnant. In short there is not a large continuous supply of fresh air and moisture, as with, say, a bucket, car, or other steel object left outside. -- H
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JohnnyK15 had written this in response to http://www.thestuccocompany.com/hvac/Question-about-old-heating-oil-tank-35252-.htm : There are many fuel oil dealers who can perform an ultrasonic thickness test (with an EPA approved technology) on your oil tank for internal corrosion. Visit http://www.tanksure.com/welcome/homeowners/index.asp and click on your state to see who in your area offers the test and inspection. If you get the tank tested at the time of a tune-up, it will usually only cost about $40 - $50. The TankSure Program's purpose is a long-term proactive replacement program. During the initial inspection the technician can determine if your tank is in need of immediate replacement, if it qualifies for a $1000 replacement payment (some companies offer a higher payment), or if there are certain upgrades you should consider before you qualify for the replacement payment (e.g. improper fill or vent size). The tank would then be subsequently tested on an annual basis (so long as you get a tune-up annually) and the thickness measurements are analyzed to see how quickly your tank is corroding and by how much. If at anytime while you are on the program the software indicates you need a new tank, the company would tell you that you have been flagged for replacement and also give you the replacement payment towards a new tank. The initial inspection is not the "silver bullet" to determine if your tank is in sound condition, however, you're covered by the replacement payment even if your tank starts to leak.
If your tank starts to leak, there is also a magnet patch that dealers can put in certain areas as a temporary fix, but you should replace your tank before your next fuel delivery. If a tank starts leaking at a seam then a magnet patch wouldn't work.
I have more information regarding the TankSure Program if you are interested then please let me know and I live in Massachusetts. In many states you can now obtain a discount on your homeowner's insurance for having the test and inspection (in most cases covers the cost of the test).
-Jon
------------------------------------- Logic316 wrote:

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