Question about magnets

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George E. Cawthon wrote:
Electro-magnetism is one force, another is gravity. Here is your question, name two other natural forces!
============= Some, but not all, forces:
Friction, electrostatic, buoyancy, elasticity, adhesive, aerodynamic lift, thrust.
Fictitious forces: coriolis, centrifigual.
Political forces: GOP, DNC.
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How about the strong and weak nuclear forces?
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77 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
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As it turns out, these are implemented via any or any combination of the 4 known fundamental forces of the universe. None of these use either the strong or weak nuclear force. Basically it's the electromagnetic one - via electrostatic repulsion of electron shells of atoms, and any electrostatic attraction between molecule regions having an "above-normal concentration of electron presence" (molecule regions negatively charged) and molecule regions having a "below-normal concentration of electron presence" (molecule regions positively charged). Although often enough we experience gravity.

How we feel these (or the non-fictitious forces that the fictitious ones are "the equal and opposite reaction to", as in the force that forces an object to take a curved path) is normally through the electromagnetic one of the four known fundamental forces of the universe.

- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Don Klipstein wrote: ...

Of course, at the fundamental level, special relativity shows that it's actually space-time that is curved by the gravitational field and the object takes a straight path... :)
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dpb wrote:

That, of course, was intended to be "general"...
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Despite all the good answers here, I think that your son is asking how does something in the magnet reach out and with no apparent means attract a piece of iron. And I think the answer is that no one knows.
It's observable, and observers can give lots of details, but that is not the same thing as saying how it happens.
IIRC and part of this I clearly don't RC, there are two inter-something forces, the small and the great xxxxx. One of them is what makes atoms and molecules stick together, and the other is magnetism. They can be described in detail, like similar poles repel and opposite poles attract, and even more detail than that, but none of this says how it happens.
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mm wrote:

1. If you cut a magnet in half, you get two magnets each with a N and S pole 2. If you hit a magnet with a hammer, (or drop it) you might lose some if not all of the power (or magnetism). 3. You can rub a screwdriver on a magnet and transfer some magnetism to the screwdriver. Just my 2 cents Chuck
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Chuck B. wrote:

But, you can take an unmagnetized iron rod, orient it correctly in the earth's field (I ferget which way.) and pound it on one end with a hammer. That will weakly magnetize it.
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
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wrote:

It's observable and more importantly predictable. That's basically the extent of the science there (don't get me wrong, it's very important and useful, but not the same as true understanding, as you say.)
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Good luck! No one really understands magnetism any more than anyone really understands gravity. In other words, it's essentially "magic".
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