Question about insulating my shed to make it a home office

I am looking to turn my new (to me) wooden shed into my home office. It has wood siding and double pane windows. I want to add electrical and insulate /drywall it so it can be used as a home office. I am fine on the electrical and drywall, but have some questions about the insulation.
Since it is a low pitch roof with no ridge, how should I be ventilating it (or do I not need to)? There is no attic and the plan was to insulate it an d have the fiberglass batting flush up against the roof sheeting. I don't w ant to have issues with condensation/mold in the future though. The shed wi ll not have AC or heat. The roof is asphalt shingles over felt roof paper ( no insulation between sheeting and paper.
Any suggestions are welcome. Thank you.
Pic of shed ->
http://i.imgur.com/if1HJum.jpg
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On 4/9/2016 12:16 AM, Chris Karnacki wrote:

You may be better off with rigid foam insulation. There is a lot of information at www.insofast.com I used their panels in my basement and they are easy to install.
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On Fri, 8 Apr 2016 21:16:27 -0700 (PDT), Chris Karnacki

put sheathing on the inside of the rafters, then strap and insulate, applying wallboard to the cieling over the insulation. You can use steel studs for the strapping.. Vent above the sheathing.
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Since it is a low pitch roof with no ridge, how should I be ventilating it (or do I not need to)? There is no attic and the plan was to insulate it and have the fiberglass batting flush up against the roof sheeting. I don't want to have issues with condensation/mold in the future though. The shed will not have AC or heat. The roof is asphalt shingles over felt roof paper (no insulation between sheeting and paper.

It doesn't look like you have the height for much insulation. If it were me I think I'd put fiberglass bats between the rafters. I wouldn't worry about venting the ceiling, though if there's room you could put small vents on either end and leave a bit of space, to vent some of the heat coming from the roof itself. There's no reason that you need vapor barrier inside, since you clearly live in a warmish place and you're only dealing with a single, small room. So any moisture in the ceiling can migrate out. (The appeal of a vapor barrier is to maintain interior humidity.)
Also fiberglass for the walls. As Ed said, panels are less messy to work with, but you don't get much insulation out of them and it's hard to fit them snugly.
If it were me and I was concerned about Summer heat I might also consider awnings, if any windows get direct sun. Such a small building could heat up quickly.
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On 04/09/2016 8:02 AM, Mayayana wrote: ...

...
Nonsense...2" foam is R10 which is within 10% of 3-1/2" R11 fiberglass.
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On Saturday, April 9, 2016 at 12:16:31 AM UTC-4, Chris Karnacki wrote:

as wood siding and double pane windows. I want to add electrical and insula te/drywall it so it can be used as a home office. I am fine on the electric al and drywall, but have some questions about the insulation.

t (or do I not need to)? There is no attic and the plan was to insulate it and have the fiberglass batting flush up against the roof sheeting. I don't want to have issues with condensation/mold in the future though. The shed will not have AC or heat. The roof is asphalt shingles over felt roof paper (no insulation between sheeting and paper.

I'd say the same principles apply to all roofs. I would treat it like a cathedral ceiling. Put in ventilation baffles between the rafters, then insulation, then drywall. Use a ridge vent at the peak, continuous soffit vent strip at the bottom.
Can you get away without it? Probably, depending on how much it's heated and occupied, etc. It's not as bad as a house, where you'd have it heated all the time and sources of humidity present. Depending on how strict your area is with codes, you may want to look into that too so there are no big surprises later.
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