Prospects of selling a house next door to a "reformed" spree killer?

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How many people purchased a house with any knowledge of the history of their neighbors?
Dick
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Also, neighbors move away and new people move in.
Not everything in life is in our control. One of the first tenets in wisdom, IMO.
Banty
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On Tue, 17 Jun 2008 22:31:41 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

That's not their job. Just because an agent lives near the person does not mean the agent MUST know of the person's incarceration or court rulings.
Since it so happens it is 10 years since the Columbine shooting, I believe you are referring to this case?
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No, this was a different school shooting. The killers at Columbine both killed themselves as their final act. Kinkel apparently had also planned to kill himself but was subdued by classmates before he finished his rampage.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I would guess that disclosure not necessary and if it were murderer's residence, it would probably be up to local laws. For example, I'm pretty sure that here, you could disclose it but if everybody in the house died of AIDS, disclosure is not allowed by law. The people to ask are your local real estate association.
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frankdotlogullo@comcastperiodnet says...

That disclosure may not be allowed by medical persons, but it would hardly be against the law for anyone else (not having access to privileged records). Slander/libel might be an issue, unless it's true.
--
Keith

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On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 05:14:05 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (Dick Adams) wrote:

Unless state law requires it, no real estate agent is required to do a background check. In most states, it is illegal to deny an ex-con housing based on this fact. Let alone a person on probation.

In most cases, according to Megan's law, Lee only has to notify the sheriff of the county he wants to live in. There are other conditions that would then direct the sheriff to notify the prospective neighbors.
It is not the job of the real estate agent to make these disclosures unless required by state law.
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richard wrote:

Huh? In my state, an ex-con cannot be a lawyer, schoolteacher, accountant, become a barber, cosmetologist, surveyor, architect, get a hazardous chemical endorsement for their driver's license, own an exterminating company, nursery (either plant or kid), vote, become a notary, sell securities, be a REALTOR(!), or drive a cab.
I'd be astonished to learn that ANY state outlaws discrimination against a felon.
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Most of us are astonished whenever Richard says something that is a correct statement of the law.
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wrote:

Which state would this be in?
The issue is housing. Not employment.
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richard wrote:

My state is Texas. Frankly, I'm distressed that my state even allows them to marry, own property, or attend a church.
Discrimination is not, per se, illegal.
I recall when Peter Lawford and his wife tried to buy an apartment in New York and the resident's committee turned down their application. When pressed, the committee said: "He's an actor and she's a Democrat. We don't allow either on the property."
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wrote:

That's a totally different situation. As neither condition is protected by law, they can turn down people on those basis.
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Richard, we've been through this before. Being a convicted criminal is not a protected class and someone can refuse to rent/sell to them based on that factor.
Suppose a single woman with three daughters has a room to rent in her house, and a convicted child molester who was just released from prison wants to live there. You think she is required by law to rent him the room? Do you really?
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says...

A seller can refuse to sell. A landlord can refuse to rent *if* its an owner-occupied situation and under a certain number of units, particulars depending on laws and ordinances. Based on the right of association.
But that's far different from what a *realtor* should, or even can, do.

That would an owner-occupied rental case - she is not required to. But that is fundamentally different from the question the original poster posed.
Banty
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The issue deals with real estate agents. Not landlords. Besides, under Megan's law, he would not be allowed to live in those conditions. A landlord has the legal right to deny anyone. Specially a homeowner who is just renting out space.
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You said "it is illegal to deny an ex-con housing based on [being a criminal]." I showed that once again, you are wrong.

You don't know the first thing about Megan's Law. Such as, for example, each state has its own version of Megan's Law with its own requirements and limitations.

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Sure. First you have to recognize that there are some things the government won't or can't do to help you - you must take matters into your own hands. You, and several of your burly neighbors, could organize a little house-warming party for your new best friend. You could make it clear to your new neighbor, partly though a show of weapons, but mainly through the letting of blood, that his continued presence is cause for discord and conflict within the community.
Guy I used to work with came home one day and his wife told him that a new neighbor had groped or otherwise molested their six-year old daughter. My friend and three of his buddies visited the perv and beat him so badly he couldn't even lie down. Told him he had 48 hours to be out of the county.
It worked.
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That's called assault and battery, and possibly tresspass as well, and the government most certainly can and will help *him* in that regard.

Lucky him.
Banty
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wrote:

And the perv could have filed assault and battery charges as well have sued in civil court and won. Guess who the jail bird is now?
This isn't the days of the wild west where vigilante style law enforcement is the law of the land.
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richard wrote:

It is here (I'm in Texas). Too bad some have to live in a community where they have to put up with such nonsense. Our sheriff once said to a criminal defense attorney: "Don't fuck with me, asshole! I can get you killed for a case of beer!"
Lest you think I exaggerate, Google "Joe Horn." This guy is waiting for a grand jury to no-bill him for gunning down a couple of goblins in his front yard. The squints had just burglarized Joe's neighbor. Joe saw his duty and he did it.
As to your specific observations: If the complainant is dead, there's really no viable criminal action. Regarding a possible civil action, that, too, dies with the only adverse witness.
Oh, and the guy I used to work with? He was the resident deputy sheriff. In the most populous county - out of 255 - in the state (about four million people live here). It's a great place to be! (unless you're naughty).
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