Proper insulation for the Chicagoland area?

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Even if I found what the air infiltration rate should be of the window, I have no idea how to test it.
After doing a bit of investigation this weekend (since it was 55degrees out), I think I might have found the issue. There is a slit on the outside of the window at the bottom of the casing that is not caulked. I belive it is not caulked to allow water to seep out. This looks like it would allow air to enter the side cavities. I don't think I want to caulk the outside casing since I would want water to drain, but I think it would be safe to caulk the inside of the cavity. I'll have to do more research tonight. I'm going to take leaf blower to different areas of the window and see where its getting in.
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Let the window co tell you whats wrong, let the builder fix it. If it has a infiltration rating its a good enough window where you should not feel air comming in with under maybe 40 mph wind gusts
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Oh... I'm sure the window company will say that nothing is wrong with it.
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So... I should get a Silverline rep out... not the company that installed them.
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You need an independant inspector, call Silverline and an atty. you are being BSed Im in OakPark Ill . I bet your subdivision is substandard..
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A Silverline rep is coming out today. I'm almost positive that its from the weep holes. The windows are Silverline 2900 single hung. I found the model number on the window. They are definately not their cheapest builder grade windows. "Our Premier New Construction Single Hung Window".
http://www.silverlinewindow.com/productDetail.cfm?MID=2900&cat=NC&type=single
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I saw the air infiltration test, you should not feel any air comming in.
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Silverline rep just left about an hour ago. He replaced the felt pile with stuff twice the thickness. He said that the state of Illinois allows a 12% infiltration rate on windows. I live in a middle of a subdivision with no houses built around me yet. He said, until the houses around me are built up, with the winds in the open fields around my house gusting, you're always going to feel a small amout of air. He claims no window can keep all the air out.
I think it comes down to the fact that I have cheap builder grade windows.
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How do you do an air infiltration test? He said that the only way these tests are done, are in the lab. He said there is no way to actually test the actual percentage of air getting through a window at a homeowners house.
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m> wrote:

m> wrote:

Casements usualy have the best ratings in sealing out air leaks, when I called pella they said no you should not feel any air, they came out and fixed a few, your window rates as good as silverline casements , which I think is an excellant rating, the fact he did repairs tells you something. But I still say only with 30-35 mph gusts should you feel anything. If they leak in moderate wind they need to be fixed, you have a lifetime warranty but need help figuring it out, the test is done in a lab, You could get a blower door test done for maybe 300, it will give a readout of house air exchanges per hour and the tech goes around with a smoke stick pinpointing leaks and how good or bad your home is overall and if he thinks windows are affecting performance. Why didnt this rep schedule fixing all your leakers.
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Although they have not gotten back to me on the exact model of Silverline's, their spec list calls for "Energy efficient double pane- low e vinyl windows".
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Anderson just bought SilverLine in 2006, and, according to this press release, the operate the company as a "stand alone subsidiary."
I haven't noticed a difference in quality from before Anderson bought them 'til now. They are an inexpensive, perfect for a builder. Not necessarily bad, but not top end either.
To the OP - I would expect that the hvac guy told you that the t-stat is capable (internally) of reading down to a tenth of a degree. It will run the furnace as necessary, sometimes in short cycles, to keep the house at the setpoint of the t-stat. This is done for your comfort, as wide swings would be annoying.
JK
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I think most thermostats have an adjustment that determines how far off the setpoint it allows the temp to drift before taking action. So for example if you set it to 68, will it allow the temperature to drift down to 67.5, or 67, or 66 before kicking on the furnace, depends on this adjustment. I know my old cheapo Honeywell round thermostat had this, but you had to take the cover off to monkey with it. If you feel it is cycling on an off too much, adjusting the drift setting may help with that.
"Setback" usually refers to a feature on the thermostat that allows you to set the temp to different values for different periods of the day. So for example you can set it to go down at night, and perhaps during the middle of the day if no one is home then, but be toasty in the morning and evening when you are up and around. -- H
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Maybe its called, Swing
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We do have a programmable thermostat, but it doesn't help much since I have a stay at home wife with 3 kids... so the house is always set to 69.
I went through the manual (will check again tonight), but I found nothing about the setpoint. Here is the thermostat that I have:
http://yourhome.honeywell.com/Consumer/Cultures/en-US/Products/Thermostats/Programmable/Professionally-Installed/PRO/Default.htm
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Here is a hint for instalation quality. 1st if any window is out more than 1/8" in plumb, - level or square it is not even in warranty now or ever was , because of defective installation....
Second get manufacturers guarnteed ratings for CDF, Air infiltration, U Value, R value, and do some looking. Im in Chcgo area and it sounds like you got all of the cheapest stuff not rated "Energy Star" Unforatuly only an uninformed puts in an 80% efficient furnace in Chicago in 2007.
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How do I check for plumb, level or square?
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An oversized furnace cycles more and at moderate temps may rarely get to be near rated efficency, [ why anyone is even allowed to use or sell an 80% unit in Chicago is dumb, but im stupid] Get window info online and warranty. Get furnace date online. Measure attic insulation depth youself. Measure windows for Plumb -level - square yourself and dont tell him, it could be an install issue. Check out warranty yourself by calling the window co. Did you know England does not allow non condensing units even though temps dont get much below freezing. Thank your EPA and George W Bush for this stupidity. So think for maybe 500 more, or a few hundred if only condensing units were sold you Would be saving 11-16% a month , depending on what model you chose, at 200-300 im guessing 15% is alot..
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Why would the builder not want to have these issues fixed? The company that installed the windows are responsible for their worksmanship. If the window is out of plumb, level or square, the installers should come back out and fix it and he shouldn't be out anything... at the least he is gaining a happy customer... or am I wrong?
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dbp, any condensing furnace will save the near rated amount over a noncondensing unit. or a 95% unit will save 15% over a 80% given the same environment.
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