Propane torch problems in winter

Why is it that whenever I use a propane torch in winter, it causes all kinds of problems. This never happens in warm weather. And of course the torches are needed more in winter, for thawing frozen yard hydrants and everything else that screws up due to winter cold.
First off, the torches never seem to burn properly in cold weather. I guess the propane is cold so it likes to shoot out flat flames that spit an sputter and generally be a pain in the ass to use.
But that's just part of the problem. The bigger problem is when the torch refuses to shut off after using it. I can only guess that frost/ice builds up on the valve. They never shut off..... So, the solution to that is to unscrew the torch head from the disposible cylinder tank. That shuts off the torch flame, but it never fails, the tank continues to expell gas from the valve where the torch head was connected. The solution to that seems to be to take the tank into a heated space, and once they heat up, the quit leaking. However, taking a leaking propane tank indoors where there are pilot lights and stuff, not to mention having to breathe raw propane, means that the only thing to do is leave the tank outside.
Thus, the next day the tank is empty!!!
So, buy a new tank of propane for each and every winter job you do, and the rest of the gas goes to waste into the air.
Has anyone ever found a solution to this????
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On 1/19/2013 2:51 AM, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

Where do you suppose the frost that's freezing up on the valve comes from? Unless there's water in the propane tank, how does it get into the valve?
You don't say how cold cold is. Or how big the flame. As the propane evaporates to feed the flame, it gets colder. At some point, it refuses to evaporate fast enough or condenses in the hose/pipe and spits out liquid propane. All assuming the tank is upright.
I gotta say that I've never seen undamaged valves that refuse to shut off.
Have you tried a different torch? Perhaps the connection to the tank is bent and is damaging the cylinders.
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Keep the torch and tanks indoors, so they don't get badly cold?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Why is it that whenever I use a propane torch in winter, it causes all kinds of problems. This never happens in warm weather. And of course the torches are needed more in winter, for thawing frozen yard hydrants and everything else that screws up due to winter cold.
First off, the torches never seem to burn properly in cold weather. I guess the propane is cold so it likes to shoot out flat flames that spit an sputter and generally be a pain in the ass to use.
But that's just part of the problem. The bigger problem is when the torch refuses to shut off after using it. I can only guess that frost/ice builds up on the valve. They never shut off..... So, the solution to that is to unscrew the torch head from the disposible cylinder tank. That shuts off the torch flame, but it never fails, the tank continues to expell gas from the valve where the torch head was connected. The solution to that seems to be to take the tank into a heated space, and once they heat up, the quit leaking. However, taking a leaking propane tank indoors where there are pilot lights and stuff, not to mention having to breathe raw propane, means that the only thing to do is leave the tank outside.
Thus, the next day the tank is empty!!!
So, buy a new tank of propane for each and every winter job you do, and the rest of the gas goes to waste into the air.
Has anyone ever found a solution to this????
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On Jan 19, 8:16 am, "Stormin Mormon"

my gas grill has issues like the OP. We grill all year long.
Occasionally when its very cold I bring the tank indoors and put it in my kitchen sink and run hot water over it, otherwise the gas remains a liquid and the fire burns poorly.
AAs to gas wouldnt shut off I had that occur to my torch:( I think the OP should try a new torch with MAPP gas. since i went to mapp all these problems ended and soldering copper lines got far easier, because of the higher temperature map burns at.
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wrote:

Assuming Home Depot carry this stuff are the cylinders the same as the Propane cylinders and can I just use this with my existing small propane torch or do I need to buy a new torch?
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Some torches will do either, and some are propane only. I truly don't know what is the differencd.
HD and Lowes have a Mapp torch that is "self lighting" and comes with one tank of Mapp. Costs about $40, which is cheaper than a plumber call later.
Mapp tanks don't work well when cold, keep the tanks indoors. Worthington had a recall on mapp tanks, get some other brand.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

Assuming Home Depot carry this stuff are the cylinders the same as the Propane cylinders and can I just use this with my existing small propane torch or do I need to buy a new torch?
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On Sat, 19 Jan 2013 14:09:03 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

To those who replied, I have several torches and they all screw up in the cold. Two of them have hoses going to the head, which eliminates tipping the tank, which I know dumps liquid propane to the flame.
As a comment about Worthington torches and tanks. From personal experience, I tell everyone to avoid all their products. I bought one of their self igniting trigger torches. The flame was very tiny and no bigger than the flame on a Bic lighter. I tried to use it, and the flame became smaller by the second. After 5 minutes of use, the flame went out and would not relight. Even applying an external flame to it did nothing. The gas simply did not come out. (This was indoors and not in the cold). I returned the torch, and got a replacement (same model). That one was even worse. It burned for less than a minute and would not relight.
Before returning it, I went to their website and send them a detailed email, explaining the problem and asking if this model was defective, or if there was a bad batch of them, with apparently clogged orfices. I told them the place I bought them. I then asked them what their warranty covered, explaining that the store I bought them at, is over 50 miles away (I live in a rural area).
I had expected them to honor their warranty, or make some sort of remedy for the situation. Three weeks later, I had not gotten a reply email. I sent the same email again, this time telling them that I had already sent this on *date* and had not heard back. I told them I expected a email reply or phone call based on their warranty. I sent the email with a return receipt this time.
I never heard back from them, and that was over a year ago.
I did return it to the store, and demanded a refund. They gave me a refund without question, and said that they were getting almost all of these torches back as defective, and that they were no longer going to sell any Worthington torches or products, because the company does not honor their warranty, and is terrible to deal with. The store no longer sells their products at all, and is a large home supply company.
One final note about this. When I returned the second torch, I had left it connected to the tank for over a month. Although it never ignited, the tank was empty. I have no clue where the gas went on a torch that would not burn after one minute of use.
Avoid Worthington products!
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On Jan 19, 2:19 pm, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

maybe they should be called Worthless
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On Sat, 19 Jan 2013 20:32:39 -0800 (PST), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

That sounds like it makes more sense, because worthless is what their products are!!!!
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I can't see why the valve on a torch wouldn't work properly in cold weather either.
But, in cold weather, propane won't evaporate nearly as fast as in warm weather, and you may have a problem with the torch going out because the liquid propane in the tank isn't evaporating fast enough to keep a strong flame going.
--
nestork

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On Mon, 21 Jan 2013 05:15:17 +0000, nestork

Thick frost tends to buildup on all torches when used in very cold weather. I think it builds up inside the valves too. But thats just a guess since there is no way to see inside the valve.
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On Mon, 21 Jan 2013 08:37:07 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

Does NOT build ip inside the valve, or torch. It only builds up on the outside of the tank - and even that would not happen, in, say Arizona or New Mexico because the humidity is not high enough to condense out on the tank. Propane itself is a 100% dry gas - absolutely NO moisture in it.
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On 1/19/2013 5:51 AM, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

I see boiling point of propane is about -40 degrees Fahrenheit. That's pretty low but when it evaporates it also cools the tank even further. Don't know what size tank you are using but I've never seen problem storing the small ones for the torch or propane stove in the house. Five gallon tanks, I leave out doors.
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snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote the following on 1/19/2013 5:51 AM (ET):

Warm the tank before you go out. Place it in hot water for a bit, but don't use a flame. That's just the way propane works in the cold. Ever try to cook on an outside propane grill in the cold winter? The meat will go bad before it gets enough heat to cook. Nah, that isn't true, it just seems like it does. :-)
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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