Problem with AC unit:Temp really hot in one room only? Help

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Bob Brown wrote:

There are many ways to measure the volume (Cubic Feet per Minute CFM) of the air. CFM = Duct or grille/diffuser (free-area in square feet) X's Velocity. http://www.udarrell.com/external_static_pressure_readings.html - udarrell
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On Thu, 22 Jun 2006 18:51:25 GMT, "Joseph Meehan"
Wait, also My bedroom is one of the first 2 places the air goes, so it should be cooler than rooms farther from the unit, correct?
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wrote:

Not necessarily. The ducts begin at the plenum of the air handler and different ducts will actually have 'higher pressure' or more potential air flow. the ducts typically have dampers installed which will let you 'tune' the air flow. you might restrict the flow abit to colder rooms to permit more air flow to your warmer room. These dampers are not to be confused withe the flow adjustment at the registers which blow into the rooms.
lee h

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On Thu, 22 Jun 2006 17:30:13 -0400, Bob Brown

Regardless, you could close some of the dampers to other rooms a little bit, and that will put more cold air in that room.
In the long run, I also don't think it would matter if there were rooms before your room. It's about balancing the dampers to get what you want, within the limits that others here might put on things.
There's only one run from the AC? What about rooms on the other side of the house?
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Bob Brown wrote:

Not the temperature of the air the volume of air.
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On Thu, 22 Jun 2006 18:54:11 GMT, "Joseph Meehan"

I have no way to measure the volume of air unles you can think of something??
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Bob Brown wrote:

You hand might work. Is more or less air coming out? What is the size of the vent compared to others?
All this may help pin it down, but in the end I believe you are going to need to have someone come out unless it is a simple matter of having a damper partly closed when it should not be.
BTW how is it in winter??
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On Fri, 23 Jun 2006 00:54:58 GMT, "Joseph Meehan"
This room is so hot is rediculous. At least 82-85F all winter
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On Thu, 22 Jun 2006 23:40:26 -0400, Bob Brown

His was a good question. Do you try to close the register in that room during the summer. How hot is the rest of the house.
Maybe you should not adjust the dampers, or adjust them to put *less* air, less heat in to the bedroom. Then install a fan in the duct for the bedroom, with a convenient swtich to turn it off in the summer.
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wrote:

I close them in the winter, and that cools the room considerable amount, 5-7F
The rest of the house, winter time, is around 74-75F
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Bob Brown wrote:

Interesting. Now why is it so hot in the winter? I suspect when that is addressed the answer for summer will be found.
Where is all that heat coming from. What heat sources are in the room (anything consuming power, including gas or electric) Where might heat come into the room (skylights, windows walls floors and ceilings)?
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Joseph Meehan wrote:

Good questions. Because if it were a balance problem with not enough air flow, then the room shouldn;'t be 85 in the winter. Something is very wrong here.
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On Fri, 23 Jun 2006 11:34:24 GMT, "Joseph Meehan"

I think he has a computer running most or all the time. I don't know how much effect that has.
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wrote:

I happened to have tested that theory this morning while I was out.
With comp on and air on, 79.4F With comp off and air on, 76.2F
But, it never ever gets to the same 71.5-72F that the rest of the house gets. SO something is still wrong I assume.
BTW, comp was off for 5 hrs+
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On Fri, 23 Jun 2006 13:55:36 -0400, Bob Brown

That strikes me as a big difference.
It's not just air that gets hot in a house, it's the wood furniture, the walls, the floor and ceiling, the door, the metal objects, everything, including the computer itself, everything (although I only listed things likely to be in a bedroom) and when the air is replaced with cool air, the new air is warmed by all the things that were warm but not exchanged. I think 5 hours is not enough to see the full effect of not running the computer.
Also, do you leave your printer on all the time, even though you only print some of the time? Laser printers have a heater, a fixer, that stays hot all the time. It's at least 8 1/2 inches long, and hot everywhere it matches the paper. And every printer uses some current when it on. (I think all those with wall transformers, which is all of them, use current even when they are off! though I don't know how much. That's why I use one of those control boxes that is flat and goes under the monitor. I can separately turn off my printer, my powered speakers, my monitor, without leaving my chair, and they are turned off completely. Even the wall transformer. I can go days without printing anything, and my printer is off except for a few minutes when I'm printing.
Also the UPS gets quite hot, if you have a UPS, and it uses current all the time too. (Though I rest my foot on it and it doesn't get *hot* until after the computer's been running a while.
Plus lights.
AFAICT, all electricity used in a given room turns into heat. Even if it is first used to make light or motion, unless the motion lifts something and imparts potential energy to it, all the other energy used is converted to heat either immediately or soon thereafter. The light that escapes out the window heats the outside, but whatever is reflected by the window hits something else in the room and either warms it or in part is reflected again, and eventually it turns into heat.
Even in an all white room with no windows, the light disappears very soon after you turn off the switch. And if you leave the switch on, the room doesn't get brighter and brighter for hours at a time. All that earlier light is converted to heat, in the room. Plus all the light that shines into the room that doesn't escape out again. The sun is enormously hot.
The guy who owned my house before me had curtains that are blue on the inside, and white vinyl on the outside. He liked hot weather and thought Baltimore wasn't hot enough, so I think he got them so he could sleep in the dark, but they also keep out the heat. The more they are closed, the more they reflect back out most of the light that the sun shines in. If they were dark blue on both sides, they would absorb the light that fell on them, converting it to heat, and then conduct the heat to the other side of the drapery, and then radiate it into the room. You know it is radiating heat, because dark blue does not reflect much light (or it wouldn't be *dark* blue) and so if it didn't radiate it would get hotter and hotter and too hot to touch.

And how long is it usually on each day?
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wrote:

Maybe once a week it's off for 2hrs or less.
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On Fri, 23 Jun 2006 14:55:49 -0400, Bob Brown

BINGO. IMH&NSEO.
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wrote:

What does IHM&HSEO mean please?
Also, are you or anyone else suggesting that the heat problem in my room is because the computer is on all the time?
Not those "see-through" paper thin curtains I have???
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On Sat, 24 Jun 2006 08:57:08 -0400, Bob Brown

In My Humble & Not So Educated Opinion. :)

I think it all contributes. Maybe 50/50 or 30/33/33. I guess I'd try the most likely or cheapest/easiest to remediate first How much the windows matter, I can't tell from here. I do try to remember to close my curtains on sunny days in the summer time, except 6 inches for a breeze. When I don't, it's definitely too warm when I get to the room. I almost never use AC.
I have friends who even with AC are planning on putting film on their living room bay window. They can just stand there and feel all the heat coming in.
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On Fri, 23 Jun 2006 11:34:24 GMT, "Joseph Meehan"

Have some crappy curtains in my room. You can clearly see sunlight through them. Perhaps BLACK thick curtains?
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