Primer for painting exterior walls


I am in the process of repainting my house. I need a primer for the exterior stucco wall, eave mount fascia wood boards, the aluminum gutters that are attached to the fascia board etc...
The paint store suggested that I get a special primer for each surface - a masonry sealer for the stucco wall, for the fascia board use a wood primer and for the gutters use something for metal...
But as I pressure cleaned them, the original paint on the walls, the gutters and fascia boards are still there, there are spots that were removed by the pressure cleaning but that is less than 5%. Therefore the primer will be applied not over the raw materials - stucco, wood, alumnimum, but over the existing paint which is arcylic. Following that logic, I would say it makes no sense to use a wood primer to paint on a fascia board that is covered by more than 95% existing paint, hence I need a primer for existing paint surface, right? or am I overanalyzing?
Thanks in advance,
MC
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What about spray cans that are for each type of surface? I know there is spray for metal. Then just touch up the exposed areas and feather it into the good solid paint. The stucco and wood might be able to be done with the same type of acrylic primer. (Just guessing). It's problems like this that can drive you nuts! Good luck.
_______ KaCe
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I would just outdoor kilz primer all of those.
Except if you end up with bare aluminum which I would zinc chromate bare spots. Old aluminum in florida probably already has oxidation, chalkyness, from salt air, etc so nothing will be perfect...so I wouldn't overanalyze it. Some say use oil based primers,etc but florida heat makes everything expand and contract, latex has some give to prevent cracking.
Florida air, heat,etc is tough on everything...just get it done and be prepared to do it again in 10 years or sooner =) Hell even anodized and powder coated aluminum looks like crap down here after 10 years.
the primer is also too help bond new paint to old surfaces.
If the aluminum is previously painted I personally would probably only primer bare surfaces OR if the paint is in bad shape cracks, lots of peeling, chalky I would definently primer. Otherwise if the paint is in good shape I'd probably go right over it. Unless the color is very different then I would primer it to save on paint costs. Safer to primer though for a few bucks and extra hours.
on the old stucco, the pressure washing is to remove paint that is not bonded, clean the surface,etc if the left over paint is not chalky you can probably safely paint over it but given the amount of work I would primer it. If you're in florida it is probably chalky. The primer will save on paint costs big time...primer is cheaper than paint, it will also provide a better finish.
Save on all the special stuff, buy kilz primer, then the best exterior paint you can afford. Porter paints or sherwin williams if you have the $. I used behr on my old painted stucco and its only 5 years looks new still. but I wasn't sure how much I would use...I sprayed mine and thought I would use alot as my sprayer (graco) uses alot of paint. But it turns out after primering i used very little paint...I would have gotten the sw or the porter.
Double check your old stucco paint though...seriously....after not liking the results from my box store pressure washer I hired out a truck mounted one. My home PW didn't take jack off....the guy with truck mounted one removed 85%+ of the paint on the house in a couple hours. But my paint was 17 yrs old, peeling and completely chakly...if yours is in better shape you might not need that much horse power.
- shawn
miamicuse wrote:

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Oh also...dont skip on the prep is the most important part. Loose paint must be removed, chalky paint must be primed. Pressure wash everything, I'd wash the aluminum down with tsp....and make sure it dries real good.
- shawn
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Thanks this is great information!
Really it should take out most of the paint? may be I am not doing it right then? Should I jack up the HP and redo the pressure wash?
MC

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Thanks Shawn...just out of curiosity what is the HP I need for cleaning and paint removal? The one I am using is about 2300HP. Is this too weak? It is not taking much off and some it did enough to sort of crack it and I had to scrap it off clean. I never done this before so I assumed less HP better meaning that if I did not have enough I can always improve it by renting a bigger model versus peeling more than I am bargained for and knocking gutter straps away from their attachments etc...
Thanks again, any comments appreciated. I know the prep work is the most important part so I don't mind redoing the cleaning if it will make a better end product.
MC
shawn wrote:

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Well...you dont want to etch the stucco with the pressure..it will dont let it sit there...definently keep the wand moving thats the key.
I'm not sure on hp...i just know the storebought ones are entirely different category than the professional truck ones. But like I said I went that route because all of my paint was 15 years old and some peeling, but all of it was seriously chalky and my home one wasn't getting it off even though I knew it was pretty bad. if your paint is in ok shape you'll probably be ok.
It just depends on the shape of your old paint.
You just want to make sure your taking off any old, loose or about to be loose stuff...if you think it looks ok with yours then you're probably ok. With mine when I used my home one, it would keep on peeling off, but took a long time, the fact it kept on peeling off make me hire the large truck one because it was going to take forever. When the truck one was done..there was still some paint left but it simply wouldn't come off which meant it was well bonded. They could run the hose from the truck to the back of the house shoot up at the gables 15ft up and it would take paint off like cake..with my home one I had to be right up on it.
Plenty of people use thier home sprayer..unless your paint is in very bad shape i'm sure you'll be ok...just make sure you get all loose areas then the paint will help to seal it in. You just dont want large areas of old paint coming off under new paint. Get the major areas you'll be ok.
- shawn
MiamiCuse wrote:

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A primer should be a good solution, even in this case.
Good luck
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CIL has a latex primer called wood and galvinized metal primer, if the stucco is the califonia type stucco, no primer is required, just latex paint, if it is glass stucco I would use an oil primer.

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Even though the original paint may still be there in most areas, I would still prime it.
Recently, I used a new exterior product by Behr - it is a primer AND paint. I thought it was an excellent product.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I will be using Benjamin Moore's Fresh Start, and then their exterior paint.
MC
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Hi,
I may be painting my old stucco exterior walls as well. My house is 105 years old and the paint is peeling from a previous bad paint job. I just had some questions...
1. How are you applying the paint on the stucco? With a sprayer? Roller? Brush? 2. How did you test for the type of paint that was on it before? Is there a way to do that do you think? 3. Also to repair cracks in the stucco - a waterproofing cement fixing kind of compound would work?
thanks Janet
miamicuse wrote:

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