prevent electrical plug from wobbling loose?

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On 10/4/2012 9:34 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Who cares! Take a new receptacle out of the package and try the plug fit. Problem solved in 5 seconds. Some people can make a mountain out of a mole hill.
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"The Daring Dufas" snipped-for-privacy@stinky-finger.net Veterans of International Fart Wars
Just like Superman and Clark Kent, they always seem to be in the same threads:
http://www.google.com/search?=Moe+Gasser+Dufas
I detect a whiff of a stinky sock puppet obsessed with farting. Are you that desperate to win, Dufe, that you have to generate fake personalities to give you "attaboys?" That would be sad.

"shot
That's a great way to determine if the plug is out of specs or the outlet is worn. But once you know that we're still talking about a female hairdresser and I can't think of a single one I've known that could swap an outlet. Not if their lives depended on it.

Hardly. You've learned that a brand new outlet can hold that plug for now, but just like the "spread the prongs trick" you don't know how long it will stay that way. The whole point to buying GOOD outlets when doing the initial wiring is that they'll stay tighter, longer. But this isn't an initial wire and in fact is a fairly unusual situation.
But let's say you're right. How does the outlet fly from the store shelf and into the workstation in 5 seconds? That's the big problem with rewire solutions proposed here. A hairdresser is asking this question and she's not likely to do the work or even have it done without approval.
Alternate scenario: She goes to that same store, picks up a three-way grounded outlet extender with childproof shutters or even the typical "hammer the plug in because it's so tight" molded extension cord. She brings it to the salon and plugs it in. Pretty simple, very low cost and likely to do the job quite well. I don't think even the vastly experienced Sir Dufas could swap an outlet out in 5 seconds.

And some people can't understand how to read a simple question and so they offer help that's not appropriate to the circumstances.
This wasn't a homeowner asking the question, it was (a friend of) the employee of a commercial business who seems appropriately reluctant to offer her expertise as a master electrician to her boss. At least not without proof the outlet is bad and represents a safety hazard.
She is not very likely going to be replacing any outlets in a shop she doesn't own with skills she likely does not have. Recommending that she does so is pretty useless compared to some of the excellent, very inexpensive and easy-to-implement solutions others have put forth.
You do get credit for suggesting she test the clipper plug in a "known good" outlet. That's the least that needs to be done before suggesting her boss engage in an expensive rewiring job.
-- Bobby G.
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How about just use a light weight extension cord from the wall to the cutter power cord. Allow the extension cord to lie on the floor thus removing the "pull" from the wall socket.
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Bingo! It's certainly the sort of thing I'd recommend to an employee who's likely not in any position to order a upgrades to the salon's workstations. Most molded extension cord outlets are incredibly tenacious and hold onto plugs so tightly that it's often difficult to force the plugs into the extension cord in the first place. Those extension cords hold plugs as tightly as the outlet extenders with the childproof slot shutters I mentioned way back in this thread. Either one would probably do quite nicely.
A longer cord means that it can be routed out of the way of the stylist and is far less likely to get "tugged on" than a shorter cord. It also gives more cord to implement some of the good strain relief suggestions that were made.
Before remotely considering replacing the outlets, I'd first see if the problem was really a bad outlet(s) or some other problem. Even if was MY salon. Tug enough on any line cord and it will loosen unless it's a twistlock connector. That's because plugs are meant to be inserted and removed by average human hands.
I'll bet NEMA specs out precisely the insertion and removal forces recommended in making plug connections.
If it's a bad plug, I'd replace it with a grounded one just because the ground pin would make it very unlikely to pull out. I might do that even if the plug's not bad because it's something the stylist's friend Bob seems quite capable of doing and I doubt it needs the owner's permission. It would also likely solve the problem. Of course it's not the ideal solution, but is one that fits the parameters given by the OP.
Electrical upgrades are not usually implemented by employees like stylists. (-: I think it's revealing that most of those suggestions came from the apparently self-employed. Walking into the boss's office claiming a 'Fart War' vet on the Web named Dufas says "the salon needs all its outlets replaced" isn't going to be warmly received.
-- Bobby G.
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On 10/9/2012 11:40 PM, Robert Green wrote:

Poor Bobby, FTG Syndrome has ravaged your belittled body. Oh yea, FTG, Failure To Grok. ^_^
TDD
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On 10/5/2012 6:57 AM, Robert Green wrote:

Sorry Bobby, the only Moe I know is one of The Three Stooges. Now me and one of my brothers share the same Internet connection via a long range wireless link and our IP range is the same but he doesn't go by the handle "Moe" either but keep trying, it's entertaining. The only thing Moe and me may have common is that he/she/it may also be an old fart born in the middle of the last century. ^_^
TDD
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On 10/5/2012 7:57 AM, Robert Green wrote:

And every time some tourist had his wallet stolen, Carl Malden showed up hawking American Express travelers checks.
Does that mean Carl Malden was a pickpocket?
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On 10/5/2012 2:33 PM, Moe Gasser wrote:

Hey Moe (Curly voice), Bobby Green thinks me and you are the same people because we both fart. ^_^
TDD
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On 10/10/2012 8:45 AM, Robert Green wrote:

One more time Bobbles if you didn't grok what I posted before. Read carefully,get real close to the screen. I am not nor have I ever posted here or anywhere else as "Moe or Gasser". I think it funny that you somehow believe me and Moe are the same person or even related. My brother and I share an Internet connection via a long range WiFi connection but my bro doesn't go by the nym "Moe Gasser" either. I don't know Moe and have never carried on any long conversations with him/her/it. If you wish to continue to believe I'm Moe or anyone else, it's OK with me, I find it quite amusing. Oh yea, normal human males of all ages think flatulence is funny. If you don't think farting is funny, You're not a real man. ^_^
TDD
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Pray tell, how would a plug be defective? How can you make a "defective" plug fall out of a good socket? Good sockets are grabby. I think, in this case, you're mistaken.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
If I have a defective plug and I bend the prongs it will stay in a good receptacle.
If I have a defective receptacle and I bend the prongs on a good plug it will stay in the defective receptacle.
What have I learned? I've learned that bending the prongs on a plug will help it stay in a receptacle regardless of whether the plug or the receptacle is defective.
What haven't I learned? I haven't learned which one was defective.
Unless other plugs fall out of the same receptacle or unless that plug falls out of other receptacles, no one knows which is at fault. A few simple steps would determine that. Steps that would be easier to do than replacing either part as a guess.
We used to call swapping parts without knowing what was really wrong "shot gun troubleshooting".
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You're kidding, right? You've never seen a worn plug that was loose in a receptacle? Dimples worn down, the split prong type flattened, etc? Never?
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I've never seen a worn out plug. Seen plenty of worn out recepticles.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote:

You're kidding, right? You've never seen a worn plug that was loose in a receptacle? Dimples worn down, the split prong type flattened, etc? Never?
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On 10/5/2012 6:59 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I've seen worn/broken plugs where the two layer blades may corrode and one of the metal prongs separates. I often take a knife or small screw driver and slip it between the metal layers of the prongs and expand them which will give it a tighter grip inside the outlet. Bending the prongs to make it tighter in the outlet can often break the prongs on the inside of the molded plug. ^_^
TDD
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Well, that settles it then. If you've never seen a worn out plug, it must be the receptacle.
We can close this thread now.
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Second. Will the Sargeant at arms pose the question?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
We can close this thread now.
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Whooosh!
I believe that went right over your head, Stormy. He was being ironic. I'll explain. You seem to be implying that because *you* have never seen a bad plug that *no* such plug exists and so the case is closed. I disagree. Both DD and I have seen such plugs.
You have never seen the Angel Moroni, I would assume. Does that mean he, like the bad plug you've never seen, doesn't exist?
See the logical inconsistency in your positions?
-- Bobby G.
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No, the reverse is true. DerbyDad is correct.

I've been measuring various plugs in the house with digital calipers and photographing the results, which I've found surprising. There are several types of "defective" plugs I've come across already. Some have blades that are thinner than others, others have blades that are shorter than others and one even has blades that aren't as wide. Any plug that doesn't meet NEMA specs is likely to cause problems.
Of course, this assumes that an overseas manufacturer might want to undersize a run of 100,000 plugs to save some money in material costs and we KNOW they would never do that <cough, cough stinky drywall> because they have the highest integrity <cough, cough dogfood poisoned with melamine> and they would never abuse our trust <cough, cough tainted blood thinners>.
Aside from out-of-spec plugs, common sense tells us that different types of plugs have different insertion and removal forces and resist accidental unplugging to different degrees. A polarized two prong plug will stay inserted better than a non-polarized one and a three prong plug will "stick" better than either two prong design. More surface area means greater friction.
-- Bobby G.
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<strange comment about violent and epileptic hairdressers snipped>

DerbyDad
Exactly. It's not dispositive proof of anything except bending a plug's blades can sometimes help the situation - for a while. I tried that with my charger's plug and it still fell out of the wall. Comparing it to other plugs, I found the blades were almost 1/4" shorter than most other plugs. But it hasn't fallen out since I added the outlet extender with the childproof slot shutters. That's because those shuttered outlets require substantially more force to insert a plug - the plug blade has to force the slot cover aside against the force of a spring. It resists unplugging because of that added friction.

We've learned that it's easy to steer a thread away from initial problem. That problem was what can a hairdresser do about her clippers coming unplugged? The proposed rewire solutions all seem to ignore the fact the electricians are not likely to take work orders from non-managers or owners. The question is how does this person solve her problem within the defined boundaries of the situation? There are plenty of things to try before resorting to the "nuclear" option.

If I were a salon owner and someone convinced me I needed all new outlets and the cord still came out of the socket after new ones were installed, I think I'd be demanding a refund. Especially if that electrician failed to inspect the plug first to see if there was something wrong with it before doing the rewire.

There's the old IBM'er joke about the IBM employees on a car trip. They get a flat. The sales manager says "the car's broken, we need a new one." The software engineer says, "let's restart the car and see if the problem fixes itself." The hardware engineer says "let's swap the front tires with the back ones and see if that fixes it."
-- Bobby G.
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New outlets do not equate to "rewiring."
New outlets do not equate to "nuclear option."
Electricians are likely to do what they're hired to do. How would that be considered "taking orders?"
Outlet extenders with safety shutters, velcro, tape, hooks, rings tied on to the cord, springs for strain relief, are all back-asswards ways to ignore the problem, which, I might remind you, includes *sparks* coming from the outlet.
What the hell happened to our OP, "Bob," anyway? I seem to remember him asking for a long term solution.
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