Poor Chimney Draw

We had our chimney lined 4 years ago and despite the company's claims that lining the chimney wouldn't effect the draw, it did. We called the company back 3 times to correct the problem. They placed a fan at the top of the chimney to draw the smoke out, but this didn't work. They replaced the fan and it still didn't work. They claimed that the draw was fine but it wasn't. We had another company come and run a video through the liner to be sure there were no problems along the way, and it was completely clean, sealed and clear.
We finally gave up and haven't used the chimney since. I would like to remedy the situation. What might make this chimney work again? A stronger fan? How strong? Altering the opening to the fireplace?
Any suggestions would be welcome.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Assuming that the chimney is being used for a standard fireplace, I'd recommend buying a "certified" fireplace insert. They use smaller chimney pipes (mine uses 6") to work properly. You'll get big bonuses on heat to the house. Instead of sucking most of your house heat up the chimney, they will actually heat the house. With a big glass door, you still get the fireplace ambience.
The only problem with mine is that the fan needed to get the most heat from it is pretty noisy.
My insert has a continuous metal liner fitted to the stove top to the top of the chimney, which is really nice for cleaning. All the debris ends up inside the stove, and you don't need to remove the stove from the fireplace to clean the chimney.
I used to have a year-round creosote smell in my house from the fireplace because it would backdraft frequently. By sealing around the stove well when I installed it, that has gone away.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is a helpful sute
http://www.thechimneysweep.ca/2stackeffect.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@jackiekazarian.net wrote:

Is it posible that there an external cause for the problem? For example. air flow patterns around and over the chimney outlet can be markedly altered by tree growth or new structures being built nearby. Changes in your own structure could be contributing, like adding a dormer or sealing the house too tightly. To get air up the stack you must bring in some from outside if the Laws of Physics are still working. HTH
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
During the 1970s energy crisis, we used a wood stove to heat the house. Opening a window for a few minutes may help. I think it has to do with the fire needing a certain amount of air to combust correctly. Ty it. Priceless!
snipped-for-privacy@jackiekazarian.net wrote:

--
Betty Boop


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sorry for the typo. Try opening a window until the chimney is drawing sufficiently.
enigma845 wrote:

--
Betty Boop


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sometimes in very calm weather (although not likely I'd be putting in a fire then anyway) it takes a few minutes for chimney to heat up and fire to 'draw' properly. Also any air going up the chimney has to come from somewhere within the house. If the house is very tightly sealed and or there is an an exhaust fan or air exchanger sucking out stale air somewhere in the house you may have negative pressure. switch of the fan open a window nearby a crack. Other wise there may be outside factors; wind coming over edge of roof, chimney not high enough over local obstructions, interfering trees etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@jackiekazarian.net wrote:

room. When furnace came on it created negative pressure and if there was not good airflow into room smoke might come out of fire place. I have a second fireplace and my wife tired of smell of smoke so we closed family room fireplace off at top and bottom and put in an electric unit for appearance and a little heat.
Frank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Fireplaces and chimney opening size are closely related. There are charts out there that provide the formula for determining the number of square inches of chimney flue for the number of square inches of fireplace opening. If the chimney is too small it will not draw properly.
I think that the only way to line a chimney is to reduce the flue opening. This may have reduced it down too small for the fireplace size. You may have to reduce the opening by installing masonry or metal sides and/or top of the fireplace. Search Google for the charts and determine the new flue size and its matching fireplace opening size.
Most chimneys for fireplaces are closely matched, changing it can make a big difference. For stoves and furnaces most chimneys are oversize and lining it with a smaller liner actually can improve performance. Your sales/installer people probably were thinking this would apply to your fireplace, but in reality they know nothing about fireplaces.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.