Pole in Cement


Technically this isn't home repair, but I'm looking for some advice on cutting down a basketball hoop pole. The backboard broke off years ago so I got a nine foot steel pole in three feet of cement. The main problem is the pole is filled with cement too. Short of digging it out, I'd like to somehow just cut it off flush at ground level. Any suggestions on how to do this? Thanks for any advice.
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R Rockwell writes:

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber223
Cut through the metal all around the base. The concrete will snap like a cookie. Hammer with a sledge to chip out and bang down the stump, if needed.
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I picked up a VERY similar angle grinder from Sears at about TWICE the price.
The abrasive wheel is quite up to grinding down both steel and CONCRETE.
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Buy or rent an angle grinder, and a stack of cutoff wheels? Still probably won't be flush, though.
I'd clip the top off and mount a bird feeder or bird house on it.
aem sends...
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Take a chisel that's about half an inch wide. Chisel the concrete around where it meets the steel down at a 45 degree angle, but not too deep.
You want to be able to get down there with a torch or a grinder and cut it off slightly under the surface of the concrete. Fill with Pour Stone or equivalent. A cutting torch would be the best thing to use over a grinder.
Steve
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On Fri, 27 Apr 2007 23:14:24 -0400, "R Rockwell"

Convince the police that there are diamonds in the pole. They'll do it for you.
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Easier to convince them thaT drugs are hidden there ;)
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On Fri, 27 Apr 2007 23:14:24 -0400, R Rockwell wrote:

Hire a 9 1/4 inch angle grinder. Buy two or three metal cutting disks. About two or three inches up, cut almost all around the base leaving a couple of inches or so on, at the side where you want the pole to fall. Shift your grinder, lead and kids out of the way and push the pole over. The bit left on, may or may not break when it falls, but at least you get it down without it jamming on your blade or falling on you or the dog. I say a few inches up, cos you will probably get through without there being any concrete there. After chip around as Steve says, inside and out and cut again just below the surface. Patch hole with 4 to 1 sand / cement. If you get water pissing out when you make your first cut(old pipe not sealed at top) pull away, let it drain then cut off the pipe a bit higher than water. Mop it out and carry on. Oxy torch is good for a lot of cutting like this, but a bit of a pain for a one off.
--
Bill
http://www.builderbill-diy-help.com /
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R Rockwell wrote:

If you want to get the whole mess out clean, here's what any farm boy would do: get a post jack like the $37 Harbor Freight model, and a short stout chain with a slip hook. Attach chain to post and jack. Block the jack with an 8 x 8 or similar so it doesn't sink in the ground. Operate handle and watch how 3 tons of pressure will motate the post and cement plug upward. Move chain as necessary and continue until post assembly becomes horizontal. Odds are you can find something like this rig at a tool rental place if you'd rather not buy one. Works every time. HTH
Joe
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A pipe cutter could probably get it to within an inch of the concrete at the ground. Cut through the pipe, then bend it over to break the concrete inside. A sledge hammer on the remaining part may break it up/bend the pipe down some. A cutting torch could get it flush. A skid loader could probably work it all out of the ground in a half hour or so.
--
Steve Barker




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