Plumbing inspector nightmare

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As part of remodeling my kitchen I had to redo plumbing on the second floor bathroom that is just above the kitchen. I was pretty confident in my plumbing skills and knowledge as I did a bug plumbing project in my house before. I plumbed full basement bath including underslab plumbing, installed sewage ejector pump, stand pipe, utility sink. All work was inspected multiple times and except few issues that I had to correct everything was fine. Now a new inspector in my township came to check my new kitchen and upstairs plumbing. He rejected my work due to several problems to his view:
1. He said my house must have 1 3" vent and two 2" vents. I thought that vent size is determined by number of fixture units it vents. I have two 2" vents and that is more then adequate for my house with 2 1/2 bath. Can someone point me to the place in NPC where it states that house must have these number of vents.
2. He insisted toilet must have a wet vent instead of dry went that I put. Why does toilet must have wet vent and why dry vent is no good?
3. He insisted that rubber Fernco couplings that I used to connect new PVC DWV with old copper plumbing are prohibited despite I used them in my basement and previous inspector approved them .I also cannot understand if Fernco couplings are prohibited why any HD sells them?
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You don't say where you are at. The local code can be different than the national code. In my state (MA) a homeowner can't do his own plumbing.
I can't recite chapter and verse and I don't have a NPC book (builder not a plumber), but I can tell you what I think I know: The inspector has the authority to interpret the code as he sees fit. What the old inspector allowed is irrelevant. There is a new sheriff in town. When you change one thing it opens you up to changing everything to meet the code currently in force. Every house must have one 3" vent through the roof. Toilets are always vented down stream. You don't vent on the upstream side.
You should check to see if there is a NPC on the net. We'll see if any plumbers come along and can recite chapter and verse. Have you thought about talking with a pro?

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What BP says about inspectors and interpretation of code is true in my experience. Codes change. Inspectors change. Interpretations change. Resitance is futile. TB
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Sasha wrote:

Calling an inspector on some of his decisions can cause problems, make him lose face and create an enemy which would affect any future projects. You're the only one that can determine if fighting city hall, and still potentially losing the battle, makes sense.
Inspectors have agendas, same as anyone else. He might be of the opinion that it is his duty to take any opportunity to bring the house closer to being in complaince with the current code. You didn't mention when exactly you did that basement project, but the new International Residential Code came out only a couple years ago. Your township may have adopted it, adopted it with modifications or come up with one of their own.
Some inspectors hate dealing with homeowners. They feel it's not their job to teach plumbing/construction to someone who, in their opinion, knows nothing and is a pain in the ass. If you're run into one of those, lotsa luck!
If the guy seems reasonably willing to discuss things, but isn't budging on his requirements, ask him to point out where exactly in the code that it prohibits certain things (such as Fernco couplings). Be aware that if you live in a smaller town, your plumbing inspector may be the final authority - there may be no one to overrule him. Even if there is, his boss may be unwilling to do so if it's minor stuff and no one is "harmed". Your concerns are not for life and limb, just some added expense for you.
Look at the bigger picture before you go making an enemy.
R
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I built a deck at my old house. Replaced this awful concrete patio and iron railing (complete w/hardware cloth at the top...) that ran right up to about 1 inch from the property line. Setback in Montgomery County was, not remembering exactly now, 18 inches I think. Doesn't matter exactly. I accounted for this in the design of the deck but neglected the 3/4 inch redwood skirting. Thus I was about 1/2 inch in violation of code.
Inspector called me on it. I was polite and asked for suggestions as to what to do as I felt it was a bit unreasonable to require me to tear down the deck for 1/2 inch, especially when it was so much closer to compliance than what was replaced. He didn't really have any suggestions as there weren't any to be made, except for perhaps lose the skirting. The neighbor certainly didn't care about the 1/2 inch and was delighted that the old gulag had been torn down and replaced with a nice deck.
There was an awkward silence for a bit and I got the impression he was waiting for something. Then he said, ok, fine I'll pass it.
I asked a few folks later, 2 who worked for the county attorney's office, and one who was a contractor and they were all of the opinion that what that guy was waiting for in that pause was an offer of a bribe. I have no evidence that's what he wanted, just the 3 opinions.
Not sure what my point is w/regard to the original post just agreeing w/RicodJour that inspectors can have all sorts of agendas.
ml
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wrote:

I never gave a bribe to any official, not even when I lived in Russia, mostly because there was not a chance/need to do it.
I am curious though, how often, practically speaking, are bribes given/offered here. If I offer a bribe to a low level official, or a cop, can I go to prison for it, in reality?
i
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Ignoramus9053 wrote:

WFC's?
According to the latest statistics, every 2.6 seconds there's a bribe taken by a low level official in this country. It's called taxes you moron.

You should go to prison for stupidity, but unlike your mutha' country some here in this one take pity on dummies. That's called social services.
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Sounds like a police state. I think I'm pleased to live in the UK where you can do just about anything with your own plumbing. Apart from underground stuff that is.
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I put in all my own plumbing and never had it inspected. Didn't get a building permit for my house either.
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On Sat, 2 Jul 2005 00:10:44 +0100, in alt.home.repair RE: Re:

Yes, a lot of the U.S. is like that now.
About 20 years ago I moved from San Diego California to a rural area in Alabama. We have no building code requirements outside the city limits where I live. It's like I died and went to heaven.
I can build anything I want however I want. I love it! Nevertheless, I do pretty much do all my work to codes whereever such codes are good practice or safety related.
--
To reply to me directly, remove the CLUTTER from my email address.


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Vic Dura wrote:

OTOH, your neighbor can do the same...if he's as capable as you, that can be ok...when it's the local county doofus or worse, everything you've invested can be rendered nearly valueless... :(
While I fully understand the mentality and am glad we're outside the city 3-mile radius, I'm certainly thankful that Dad was able while on the City/County Planning Commission some 20-30 years ago to get reasonable restrictions adopted in the county. Otherwise, it would be a never-ending plile of trailers w/ open cess pools and worse...
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message wrote:

I am extensively familar with the problem...its very very common in the US particularly with state or federally funded jobs..
In some industries in SF I have been asked to quote a $17,000 job (gross profit $3,000) at $40,000 then kick back 20k to the manager in charge of the business.
Usually graft demand is for 10 to 20% of the total sale.
here is the results of a google search on the issue: 9,700 hits
When some states stopped graft and kickbacks in their states highway construction programs costs typically dropped 50%.. that gives you a clue on how pervasive the problem is.
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&biwt9&q=+bribes%2C+fraud%2C+graft%2C+government%2Cstate+of+Calif&btnG=Search
Its illegal in the US... but the money is too much for many in management positions to resist.
in other countries its not illegal and businesses there can write off the cost of paying bribes.
go see the movie "the corporation" you will find that both funny, terrifying and informative.
Phil Scott

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news:3vjxe.25471$D%

Yes, there are laws against it.
Some inspectors will accept a "tip" though. In a large city where I used to live, my step father was a contractor. He always abided by the codes, but he always left an envelope someplace in plain view. He'd step out of the room and the envelope would disappear.
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How big were those tips?
i
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This was the 1970's and depending on the size of the job, $10 to $20.
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When I was a child it was customary to tie a $20 bill to a trap if you wanted to pass inspection.
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wrote:

In San Francisco Calif..unless the headlines were all bogus... the city building dept was one huge bribery operation... gasp... that couldnt possibly be true however...these were civil 'servants' all set to retire at around age 55 with city funded pensions worth 3 to 5 million dollars each..
Phil Scott

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Phil Scott wrote:

Which headlines were those?
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I didnt clip them and glue them to my forehead or anything. It was all over the evenin' nooz in that time frame too. Possibly you ain't payin' attention?
You might find it on a google news search with the key words "San Francisco, Building, Inspector, permits, payoffs"
Phil Scott
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Phil Scott wrote:

Should have. Might have been an improvement.

Possibly i ain't, but you brought it up as if you had the 6:00 news on it... So put up or shut up.
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