Plumbing help


Hi,
I belong to a little brick bungalow in the midwest, built in '54, poured-concrete foundation.
The kitchen is in the back on the East side. Under the sink is the usual P-traps etc which direct flow into a near-horozontal copper pipe (maybe 2 " dia.) running thru the wall.
In the basement under the pipe is a window. I built a spare bedrrom down there 20 years ago. To the left of the window is a closet inside of which is the elec. svc. panel and, a few inches from the edge of the window, a cast iron soil pipe (vertical, lead/oakum joints) running thru the floor.
I just found water on the floor of the bedroom. The top of the window was soaked. Either the top of the soil pipe or, more likely, the juncture between the copper pipe and the soil pipe is leaking. I can't see the leak (yet), but there's nothing else in the immediate area to leak. Unless there's several feet of flow path from the kitchen sink supply over to the area of the copper drain pipe (doesn't sound likely, but I cant see).
I've got fans down there to dry things out. I guess in the morn I'll run water thru the drain to hopefully confirm the leak is from the drain, 'tho it's in the wall and I won't be able to see it.
Don't really know what to do. How does one nail down the source of the leak and fix? Rip the sink cabinets out, tear the plaster wall apart?
I had to cut maybe 6' of soil pipe out last year and replace with pvc, but it was horozontal and chock full of crud. Vertical cast iron soil pipe is supposed to last like 100 years? How likely is it to fail in 56 years? How likely the copper pipe (in the kitchen wall) to fail?
Any help sizing this up would be much appreciated.
Cheers, Puddin'
Pease pudding hot, Pease pudding cold, Pease pudding in the pot Nine days old ...
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plan to update the copper drain with plastic. copper + iron = galvanic action [corrosion]. any horizontal drain pipes will collect sediment. check the waste pipe above: it may be leaking rainwater where it passes up thru roof.
Puddin' Man wrote:

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wrote:

Sounds good ...

And no easy way to clear it (to my knowledge).
Come to think of it, I did snake the copper pipe some months ago ... flow was constricted.

I forgot that this drop is roof vented. The vent should have a rain deflector or somesuch?
Thx, Puddin'

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Puddin' Man wrote:

Copper in DWV service only has a life of 40-50 years. The harsh soaps and chemicals eat thru it until it looks like lace curtain.
Where the copper enters the CI stack, there should be some kind of hub you may be able to attach a Fernco coupling to and extend with 2" PVC. That would avoid disturbing the stack at all.
See if you can make a run dropped below the ceiling without duplicating the old run.
Kitchen traps connected to a 2" waste line were often permitted without a vent connection, so don't be surprised if there isn't a vent.
Bore a hole thru the floor under the sink if that looks like a good way to make the run.
Jim
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So the copper was more-or-less duw to fail ...

The stack is roof-vented. So there's maybe a 90 degree joint where copper meets iron? Yeah, if I gotta go thru the kitchen (ceramic) tiles (I dunno how), PVC would be preferable.

And just leave the old copper stuff in place? Doubt there's room, all kinds of wiring, etc above the basement suspended ceiling. Also, I dunno how to tap into the cast iron (lead/oakum).

There's a roof vent: I shoulda remembered.

It now looks like I'll hafta go thru kitchen wall, deal with the copper/iron juncture somehow. But I'll look closer tomorrow.
Damn, I hate it when they put stuff's gonna fail in the walls (inaccessable). Guess what they installed was about the best available, 'tho.
Thanks, Puddin'
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