pipe more flexible than PEX?

A section of copper pipe in my garage (supplies an outside faucet) wall bursted during winter. I heard replacing that section with PEX would make it more freeze resistant. I went and checked out PEX pipe at a hardware store and they don't feel all that flexible. Is there something flexible like garden hose and is legal to use?
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No, nothing else as good. Just because you can't squeeze the pex does not mean it won't flex when frozen. Thee may be other ways to prevent the freezup though, such as a valve further up in the line that you close so the rest of the line drains.
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On Wed, 23 Mar 2011 21:18:01 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Pex may resist bursting, but it is not designed to be repeatedly frozen. Either drain the line for the winter or use heat tape.
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anther solution is relocating the outside outlet so it no longer goes thru unheated space, and if you wish to keep the outlet where it is valve it back in the heated area and drain every winter which isnt a bad idea even with PEX
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I've heard more cautious comments about pex and freezing. That it is more resistant but a hard freeze will expand it more than it will contract back when thawed. Enough hard freezes and it will break eventually. Put a turn off valve further back up the line would be the best solution.
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On Thu, 24 Mar 2011 11:46:35 -0700 (PDT), jamesgangnc

I have that valve but I'm tired of using it. How effective are those styroam boxes that go over the spigot and are held on with sort of like a rubber band?
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They insulate, they don't make heat. In really cold weather, once the heat is gone, it will freeze. It relies on heat being transferred from inside and not being lost. No way would I trust it.
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then relocate valve to a place thats heated in winter and install a freeze proof valve. you should still disconnect garden hose in winter.
a neighbor didnt like worrying about freezing outside faucets. he replaced the damaged ones and never used them again.
he had a faucet nstalled indoors and ran the garden hose out the door. kinda inconvenient if you ask me
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wrote:

I have to check with my neighborss. We all have the same house construction, and I doubt everyone drains their pipe for the winter, like i did until two years ago. So now, one is drained and I don't use it, but the other I have to get on a ladder and use a pliers to open the knurled cap and the water runs onto things stored underneath, and the knurling on the cap is wearing out.
IOW, it's marginal or maybe unnecessary whether draining is needed n Baltimore. One two-month period I let it drip a little.

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well you could upgrade, install a valve thats easy to reach feeding the outdoor line, and a hose bib by it, so getting ready for winter close isolation valve open hose bib, no tools no climbing no frozen lines no work no effort:)
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If you have a turn off valve you may simply be able to turn off the valve and leave the faucet open during the winter.
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On Sun, 27 Mar 2011 07:42:59 -0700 (PDT), jamesgangnc

I'm always surprised when I see this talk of hose lines freezing. It's standard up north to have an inside shutoff and close it when winter rolls around, then open the outside faucet. I've got one in front and one in back. Takes no more than 5 minutes. It'a easier than cleaning gutters, another late fall ritual. Never saw a "freezeproof" valve. All it takes extra is a 3 buck valve and a nipple for an inside shut off. Maybe they don't get enough freezes down south to make it standard? Another reason might be the disadvantage of using other than galvanized lends itself to taking those shortcuts.. You're going to have sweat an additional 2 joints with copper and add whatever fittings required by PEX of plastic. With galvanized it's just a little more cranking. Another thing I don't get is this removing brick to get at a water fitting. Seems to be design by criminals. And running anything but lead pipe through concrete, and tearing up 100-year slabs because of a 10-year leak. Seems to be short term thinking behind that too. I suppose that's fear of lead poisoning, but there's mostly lead water feeds up here around Chicago, and nobody's pulling them out. I feel ok, but do get dumber as time goes by.
--Vic
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On Sun, 27 Mar 2011 10:41:39 -0500, Vic Smith

I don't know when they were invented but they must sell them by now where you are. They look like they work great. UP to 18 inches or more long and the faucet seat is thus 18" from the outside of the house. In my case they means well into the basment, where it never gets very cold. No draining, no closing another valve, no nothing. EVerytime you turn off the faucet, unless there is hose with a cap on it connected, all the water drains from the 18" between the faucet seat and the outside. Just like it does now the 2" from the faucet seat and the outside.
Is there any disadvantage to the thing?
If I replumb the front faucet, that's what I'll put in. In the rear, it's 22 feet above the basement rec reoom ceiling before the pipe comes out.

Not sure what you mean by nipple.

TWo negatives. I have to read this again. No, I'm not using galvanized. Copper.

You're back to the OP's post, which is fine.

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On Sun, 27 Mar 2011 07:42:59 -0700 (PDT), jamesgangnc

That's a good point. I have always opened the faucet, but after I drained the pipe, since I was up on the ladder anyhow. But the hardest part by far is that knurled cap, so maybe I could skip that.
I'll think about it. Thanks and thanks Bob
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I'm guessing you live in the County, then, because no one living in Baltimore City and paying those rates for water would waste it all Winter like that! <grin>
If you're just talking about a faucet that runs through heated space and then through a wall to outside (like mine were when I lived in a rowhouse in Loch Raven Village), then yeah, there's a lower possibility of freeze-up. But the OP's outside line runs through the unheated space of a garage which is a long run through space that, while marginally less cold than out-outside, is still often below freezing...and for too many of us was below freezing for extended periods of time this Winter!
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wrote:

It's worse than that. They forgot, or something, to put water meters in my n'hood, so the 109 houses have only one meter and we split the water evenly with each other, so anything I use only affects my bill by 1% of it.

Hey, that's near me!
And yes, it comes through one wall from my basement, which is heated.

I must say, I"ve lost track of the OPost, and I hope he wasn't trying to apply my situation to his.
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wrote:

There seem to be a fair number of folks here from the Balt/DC area. We should have a monthly lunch somewhere near the Laurel Harbor Freight. One of my other groups does it and it's really a hoot to put faces to the posts. And see if some of us really do have horns and a long, spaded tail. (-:
-- Bobby G.
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On Mon, 28 Mar 2011 23:09:42 -0400, "Robert Green"

I'm willing, ready, and able.

the one who caused all the trouble didn't live that far away, and we all wondered if he'd come. He didn't.
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