Pine trees

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I just had a large pine cut down because it was struck by lightning. The guy that took it down said that he has to pay to dump the pine because no one will take the pine wood.
I would think you could take it to a paper plant. Anyone know for sure?
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Yes, the guys at the paper plant will know. Why not give them a call?
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

At best they _might_ take it off your hands if you brought it to them -- no way are they going to pay or pick it up (assuming there is a mill close by anyway)...
The trimmer is probably correct if it is any place that has any trees at all that is is simply waste.
--
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Terry wrote:

his garage will take it. We wondered what the stinky acrid smell was in the winter and spotted the smoke slowly coming out of the chimney and I walked by and there was a pile of pine piled up next to the garage.
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wrote:

Is it just pine that must be paid for, I'd be calling the landfill to find out for sure. Here, all tress are free to dump, it all becomes mulch for the City to use. Or call another arbourist, they would also know.
Must be some kind of recycling center near you, that would take it for mulch.
samurai.
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I'd just wait until after Christmas when many parks departments take trees for recycling. Tell them I had this REALLY high cathedral ceiling.
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The smell was due to burning a cool, choked down fire, not from the wood. Pine that is burned as a stove should be burned has a pleasant smell as does almost all wood. There are a few that would make a skunk proud.
Harry K
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wrote:

My parents had a lot of fires in the fireplace, and much of the wood around here is pine. We had really a lot of pine trees around the house.
--
59 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
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Best friend has wood stove, after a nasty chimney fire he quit burning pine completely.
Around here you put pine at curb with free add in pennysaver, free firewood for camp.
It always disappears
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On Sat, 27 Oct 2007 13:33:08 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

South Florida was dependant on pine wood (fire wood). A Loblolly Pine has a deep tap root and was harvested from forests for turpentine.
The root is prized for kindling, at least back in the fifties.
We called it a lighter knot.. Expect this pine sap to burn hot.

Oren
"I wouldn't even be here if my support group hadn't beaten me up."
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My father told me about those deep roots, and most people in town seem to not believe it.

My father used it that way. He had a certain complicated way of starting a wood fire, that involved building a log cabin-like structure out of pine pieces.

--
59 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
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On Sat, 27 Oct 2007 20:07:11 -0500, Mark Lloyd

In the South (1800's) a mule, and / or dynamite was used to get the pine stumps out. Cleared for cotton..etc...

We kept a kindling bucket. When we split logs we picked the best piece to sliver up the kindling, Makes for easy fire starters.
-- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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Learned something. Somehow I thought Florida would be full of hardwoods. In many parts of the states (here also), pine, spruce and the like are common firewoods with Fir and Larch (Tamarack) the preferred woods. Hardly any hardwoods availble for sale. Any I come across go on my private stock not the 'for sale' pile.
Harry K
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[sniip]

the primary native trees are Live Oak, Cypress and Scrub Pine, with more than a few Red Maple, plus a decreasing number of invasive exotics, esp. Melaleuca, Australian Pine (not really a pine) and Florida Holly (not really a holly -- aka Brazillian pepper). The most common fireplace wood is the propane gas jet. The most common landscape or dooryard tree is probably a citrus -- orange or grapefruit, with magnolia and Royal Poinciana also in the mix.
From here south, the most common tree is probably the Palmetto, with Queen palms also in large numbers, if you want to include palms as "trees". In Palm Beach County, by code, three palms = one "real" tree, for landscaping approval.
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Lee and Collier require natives from a list. You can use live oaks, laurel oaks Gumbo Limbo and Sabal Palms among others. The oaks seem to be the most popular since they pretty much grow wild and are not that expensive. I have several around my house that just came up. The problem most developers don't consider is they get real big (round) so that little shrub you put in the parking lot medians soon takes over the lot. In the community my wife manages they are takling them out. They need to succumb to a mystery disease first but a little "vitimin G" will do it.
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On Sun, 28 Oct 2007 00:19:35 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Ft Myers used to have a population of 25,000.
I left; back then (little later).
Swamps were native, your international airport was commonly called "poll-crossing". A Cypress head, with poles aross the road for travel. Story was, they had "stills" back there.
-- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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Some spots in the Everglades have native maples. One of the few places you can observe seasonal changes in the leaves in South Florida.
As I kid I camped in the open near Melaleuca (_paper_) trees in pollen. That stuff got in my lungs and figured I'd die, before I got better. They suck up to much water and should be killed off.

Oren
"I wouldn't even be here if my support group hadn't beaten me up."
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wrote:

The highest elevation in Florida is 345' (North FL) above sea level, iirc. In the Panhandle, the area is full of oak. Tallahassee is beautiful with majestic oak. Central Florida is the same. The largest loblolly pine is located in a state park (around Gainesville?).
On the edges of the Everglades you can observe strands of pines growing on the high ground (for what it is). Sea level.
-- Oren
"I wouldn't even be here if my support group hadn't beaten me up."
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Still is. I use them all the time. Great for getting a fire started. Red cedar is also good since it contains a good bit of cedar oil.
Not all pine stumps turn into lighter. Seems like those trees cut in the winter when the pine sap is mostly on the roots will form lighter stumps, whereas those cut in warm weather will just rot. Lighter stumps are harvested, placed in huge pressure cookers where the steam forces the turpentine out, then sold as "steam turpentine".
Red
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I'm jealous :)

Any time I cut pine lumber and get a whiff of the pine sap, it reminds me a real lighter knot. :-)
Those pine stumps will burn for days while in the ground..
-- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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