Pin holes


I grab a paint can from the basement to paint a door. After the job I notice a puddle of pain under the can, a trail of paint from the bench and a puddle on the bench. There was enough vacuum in the can so it didn't leak from the basement across the kitchen into the garage. Only after removing the lid. What kind of f__king paint can is that? Glidden. Why in the f__ck did I get holes in my can and make a f__king mess while trying to be neat. Sometimes it don't pay to do nothing. Wouldn't that piss you off?
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wrote:

On concrete, I had one with the bottom fall out and it was oil paint, another can I noticed is oil varnish leaking all out. Take cans off the floor where its damp, maybe the lime or portand also affects it but the ones I had go bad were on plactic tile for 15 years, cans rust if it was flamable and near the water heater it could be bad.
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wrote:

== Keep paint cans DRY and put shelving paper on shelf. Plasticized paper is good. ==
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Transfer the paint into an all-plastic coffee container, masking tape to transfer the label to the coffee can, and then serenity will ensue.
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Van Chocstraw wrote:

It sure would.
I've been using the plastic bags from the stores to form a gasket under the lid. I put the bag on the can, pound down the lid, then cut off the surplus.
Now I guess I should use another plastic bag to contain the whole can !
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On Fri, 16 Jul 2010 14:36:41 -0500, HeyBub wrote:

I guess it's too much to ask American paint can makers to make cans that don't leak. More technology than America has.
--
LSMFT Consumption, the old new disease.

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wrote:

Don't keep them wet and they won't rust. That's essentially what leafing them on concrete floor is doing. Put them on a shelf and the cans will last decades. Or you could buy "K-Mart" paint. It often comes in plastic "cans".
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LSMFT wrote:

Dutch Boy paint.
Comes in a PLASTIC can with a screw-on lid and has an internal pouring spout. Absolutely WONDERFUL container (not sure about the paint).
Available at your neighborhood Wal-Mart.
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More cost. Any 'tin' can left where it can 'sweat' and build up moisture will eventually rust. Just takes common sense on how to store things. Come to think we have put leftover paint into jars and plastic bottles with screw tops and kept if for 'yeeaaaars and years'. Last time I put a new top on one of the work benches (using some scrapped plywood!) we painted it with some 15 to 20 year old paint. But we had a can rust inside the so-called cooler locker on our boat when it was stored; the can sweated, rusted and and leaked ............... what a mess. The cooler locker is not well insulated anyway and we plan to eliminate it.
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