PEX vs. CPVC vs. Copper

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Andrew wrote:

Must be your HD. We bought all our PEX pipe at our HD. They even had a few PEX fittings as well.
--
Grandpa

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HD in my areas absolutely doesn't sell PEX either, they sell tons of PB, but no PEX. Last time I asked, the answer I got was "PEX is for trailer homes, we don't sell it here."
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I've never heard of a mouse eating PVC pipe, but they'll chew through just about anything if they have a reason. Better to get rid of the mice than worry about whether they'll eat your plumbing. (They'll eat your food too, but you don't avoid food because of it).

We have a Lowes and three Home Depots in our area. I think I have seen a roll of PEX at Lowes, and maybe one of the Home Depot's. But, it was on a bottom shelf, you had to look hard for it.

And that's the catch. PEX isn't of much use without the appropriate fittings, manifolds, and the crimping tool. Even if I was lucky enough to find the PEX I needed at the home centers, I couldn't do anything with it unless I had the fittings and the tool.
You could always order everything you need online, or at a local plumbing supply, but that isn't much help if you spring a leak and need to make emergency repairs. Sure, leaks shouldn't occur under normal circumstances, but accidents happen. You could accidently pierce a pipe in a wall with a nail while hanging a picture, or the fabled mouse could chew a hole in the pipe. Using CPVC makes it easy to go to any local store and get the supplies I need to fix it. And since no special tools are required, I can easily keep a few supplies on hand just for those kinds of emergencies.
Anthony
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A local hardware chain, Aubuchon's carries some PEX and has compression fitting for it. In my case, I needed to do a 6' patch where the copper was a problem. It is a situation where it is difficult to get to solder, can't get the right fittings, etc. PEX was a simple fix. While Sacramento Dave like copper because it is a lifetime job, this particular setup has failed twice because of a bad setup from the original plumbing job.
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I replaced the entire galvanized system in this house with CPVC back in the mid 80s, have run 1" water line to the community wall for 1/4 mile in PVC, have run probably 1000 ft or more of PVC irrigation line over the years. Have never had but 2 leaks. One was my fault, I used a female PVC to iron adapter (it split on the casting line), the other was a _very_ slow drip on a hot water line that was in an awkward place to fit it up. It sealed itself in a week or two.
Copper - most expensive and hardest to work with.
PEX - cheaper but the fittings are a bit expensive and special tools are required.
PVC/CPVC - cheapest, simplest and all fittings are available everywhere, no special tool required. A hacksaw, small pipe wrench (for iron to pvc adapters) and a can of glue is all that is required. You can chop out many feet of line and fittings and just toss it at a cost of only a few dollars for replacement material.
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replying to Harry K, sherwoodarcher wrote:

In my cause I replaced all CPVC pipes in my house after ant extermination with PEX pipe. All CPVC glue get f**ked after small amount of chemicals cover the connections. I do not recommend use CPVC by few reasons see why *http://www.canarsee.com/pex-vs-cpvc-pipe *
Now fittings for PEX is cheaper than any other fittings and not necessary to glue.
--


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