PEX plumbing, water softener install, exposed PEX in the closet

So I'd never even heard of PEX until yesterday...
Long story short, I hate the local hard water, decided I needed a water softener, called the plumbing outfit that plumbed this less than year old house, had them come back and give me a quote on installing the appropriate sized water softener, was quoted $3000 installed... I could have slapped the guy.
Decided I'd DIY it. I'm handy, an enginerdy kind of guy, and this stuff doesn't scare me. I wouldn't attempt to solder copper tubing, but, as you see, I may not have to.
I hacked a hole in the drywall to look at the plumbing underneath the water heater closet, which has room for a softener. (The closet floor is about 18" above the slab.) The pipes underneath look funny; they're all plastic and red and blue. I now know that's called PEX and it requires expensive tools. But I'm cool with that because they won't cost me anything approaching $3000.
A little research on the interenet turned up Gary at qualitywaterassociates.com, and I picked out the appropriately sized water softening system.
Plotting my installation I'm thinking I'll break the main water input line where it trees off to all it's branches. I'll run PEX through holes in the closet floor, up to the softener, and back down to complete the circuit.
I realize that this isn't elegant, that ideally the input and output of the water softener would come through the closet wall, but hey, doing that would entail a lot of hassle now.
My question for y'all: Is there anything out and out *wrong* about this? I've never seen PEX before, presumably because it's only in new houses, and always behind drywall. But this PEX won't be behind drywall.
Am I committing some kind of capital offense (code violation) by having exposed PEX in the closet? (or is it really exposed if it's in a closet?)
Oh, and by the way, do need to make any special provision for PEX passing through holes in the plywood floor? Perhaps there are nice little plastic donut fittings designed for this purpose (anybody know? what are they called?)
I guess the corollary question is: is it OK to have exposed PEX plumbing underneath the kitchen sink? It's not behind drywall, but it is concealed behind a cabinet...
Thank you for your help!
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<snip>

My cabin is a 2 yr old double wide and the PEX under the sinks is exposed. Shouldn't be an issue. As far as asking an inspector, I was told by one that his job wasn't to educate the builder/ owner beyond, 'what you did is wrong and here's why'. He said that he didn't have time in his schedule to answer a lot of questions.
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where I live you couldn't legally do such a job unless you had a licensed plumber.
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If you have any pride at all, you won't leave the pex exposed. It is ugly.
On 10 Mar 2007 14:46:04 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@aristotle.net wrote:

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How big is the closet where the softener is going? I recommend a smaller one as the tank in a tank can be a real bear if it malfunctions and the salt gets wet and hard

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