painting worry


Hi,
I just finished painting my porch yesterday (Benjamin Moore Porch Latex). It was cool out (50s) and shady. My worry is that today it has done nothing but rain. Steady and heavy. Should I worry? My last coat was on ~12 hours before the deluge came, but being that it is fresh paint, etc. I touched the paint and it seems dry (wet from rain) but a bit "oily" and didn't know if that was the paint or just my imagination...
Any ideas?
Thanks, Rich
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Should be OK if the surface was dried enough.
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Thanks...unfortunately, I just noticed tiny pinhead sized blistering. Nothing big, but not good. I also noticed one spot where the paint itself literally washed off. Funny enough, there were 3 coats of latex applied within 2 days, and it still washed off. Needless to say, I'm not a happy camper right now. I hope it will just mean a touch-up or two and not a strip and repaint job.
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Latex is fairly forgiving. Let it go for a while. Then, sand the nasty areas and recoat them. Feather the last touch-up coat. Essentially, feathering is using a semi-dry brush (or roller) around the patched area where you are blending into the old paint. That way, your touch-ups will mostly be invisible.
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Here's an idea: Check the weather before you paint exterior surfaces. If a paint can says it's OK to paint when it's 50 degrees, add 10 degrees. If it says it takes 24 hours to dry completely, it means 72 hours. These are the rules. Any evidence to the contrary is a fairy tale.
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Thanks for the info... Well, as much as I understand your point, this is my first house. And while that is not an excuse, you'd think the manufacturer's recommendations of time and temp. would be right. I will remember that for next time. But, unfortunately, with 60 degree temps and 3 days to paint a coat or two, one would think that would be enough time!? I guess not. But thanks for the input anyway.
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The manufacturer's specs are for a perfect world. Every now and then, you'll get three perfect, balmy dry days and you'll think "Damn - I should've painted something". But, it's rare. :-)
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I guess it's like cars and the estimated MPGs - only in a perfect world...thanks again.
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Since this is your first house, get yourself some Muralo or Devoe paint sometime. You'll be amazed at the results. The price may shock you, but oh well.
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| > Hi, | > | > I just finished painting my porch yesterday (Benjamin Moore Porch | > Latex). It was cool out (50s) and shady. My worry is that today it | > has done nothing but rain. Steady and heavy. Should I worry? My | > last coat was on ~12 hours before the deluge came, but being that it | > is fresh paint, etc. I touched the paint and it seems dry (wet from | > rain) but a bit "oily" and didn't know if that was the paint or just | > my imagination... | > | > Any ideas? | > | > Thanks, | > Rich | > | | Here's an idea: Check the weather before you paint exterior surfaces. If a | paint can says it's OK to paint when it's 50 degrees, add 10 degrees. If it | says it takes 24 hours to dry completely, it means 72 hours. These are the | rules. Any evidence to the contrary is a fairy tale.
and if the can says "it covers 400 sq. ft." it really only covers 300 sq.ft.
| |
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Another veteran of truth! :-)
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Wait. Get a good book, Sudoku, Playboy, some beer. Put a comfortable chair out there. Keep an eye on it while it dries. Give it a few days.
Steve
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Gotcha!
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if you live in a high humidity and/or rainy area it is hard to get a good three [or more if needed] drying days in a row before you start priming. also, pressure washing pushes the dirt off but injects water into the surface of wood. painting is not for weekends only, it must follow the weather and shady side of the home. look like a pro by not dragging out the project: by rotating your painting of only one side of the home every other year and then waiting for peeling or weathering and repeating the cycle according to your needs. it will surprise you how the windy side and hot sunny side want a new coat more often than other sides. weather permitting you can prime after dark with lighting, but top coats need daylight for proper visibility for application. helpers must park their cellphones before climbing ladders.
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