Painting Question- sheetrock walls that were covered with wallpaper


Hi, I am in the process of painting a room(note: these walls are sheetrock) that the walls were covered with wallpaper. I already removed the wallpaper but noticed that the walls are not all smooth. The sheetrock material is showing in some areas, in other words it is as if the paper has been ripped -not smooth.. It feels/looks like cardboard in some areas- you can see brown cardboard, it is not all smooth.. This must be because I removed the wallpaper and the glue removed the slight layer from the sheetrock.. Anyways, should I just smooth the areas with joint compound?? then sand? THANKS- I usually paint walls that are plaster, not much painting of sheetrock
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Make sure you have rinsed to death the wall of wallpaper adhesive. Patch the spots with joint compound if not too too deep. Smooth. Prime the entire wall. You can get the primer tinted to the final color (or fraction of it lile 3/4). If you insist on not priming the entire room at least prime the patched areas or in certain light you will have dull spots where the patch is.
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One spot of glue left on the wall will show after painting. No easy way to get it _all_ off, Just scrub, scrub, scrub using one of those nylong mesh 'scrubbies' seems to work best. I tried the commercial 'take it off' stuff but was not impressed.
Harry K
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A bit late now but next time rent a steamer. Not all that expensive and will remove most papers without damage to the surface.
Harry K
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KOS wrote:

Get the wall as clean as you can. Remove any loose or peeling paper. Let it dry throughly. Then apply Guardz. http://www.zinsser.com/product_detail.asp?ProductID '
Once the Guardz has dried, check the wall for any remaining problem spots and fix those, removing the bubbled paper and re-applying the Guardz to that area. Running a blade or sanding block over the wall may help you identify hidden bad spots. There is a marked difference in the sound when you go over a bubble. You'll know it if you hear it.
Once you feel you have the surface problems fixed, skim with joint compound, sand, prime and paint.
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Ahhh, one of the WORST things I have to do in the drywall trade..Not an "easy" fix...It's a PITA no matter how you go about it...Most of the advice given is pretty good but very time consuming as chasing bubbled paper takes forever...What I do is seal the mess with Binz or Kilz..Cut out any obvious bubbles and skim the walls with Easy Sand setting type compound..Cut out bubbles and patch....Cut out bubbles and patch , ect. , ect......The last time I encountered it I convinced the home owner to put 1/4 inch sheetrock over the mess and call me back to tape it..I would have hung the rock too but he did it to save money...HTH...Good luck , you're gonna need it...LOL..
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I removed the bathroom wallpaper from hell, a few years back. The idiots applied it directly over the sheetrock, no paint, no sizing. Removing the wallpaper also took a lot of the paper off the sheetrock. After patching everything back together (I should have ripped out all the sheetrock and started over) I used Bin and then paint. After a few days the paint crazed everywhere. I was told by the guy at the BM paint store to *not* use shelac based primers for this. The surface (of the primer) was too hard and would do exactly what we saw. Instead, use a oil based primer. I sanded out most of the cracks, applied the oil primer, painted, and all was well.
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Although I hate using it because the cleanup is more difficult, priming with oil based I've found to be the best. Where wallpaper previously has been, I've found oil based stops any further bubbling of the damaged drywall surface.
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On Tue, 16 Mar 2010 10:42:36 -0700 (PDT), KOS

Thin the joint compound and do a skim coat using a large blade. Depending on your skill, you may need to sand. Inspect the wall carefully using a work light against the wall. Apply a drywall primer/sealer (you do not want skip this step!), then finally paint.
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