Painting Pressure Treated Wood


I replaced the front stairs, using pressure treated wood. How long do I have to wait before painting? I figure I should let it dry out over the summer and paint in the fall.
I read that there's pressure treated lumber sealant for wood which will be in human contact but there shouldn't be any of that. Will the wood be OK outside if unsealed?
How about plastic stair treads? Should I wait for the wood to dry or can I put those on now? They only cover part of the top of the tread and make the stairs much safer.
Paul
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Pavel314 wrote:

I prefer solid stains over paint. It doesn't peel, and therfore is easier to maintain in the future.
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FWIW, I built a set of basement stairs some years ago and painted with a polyurethane porch and floor paint just after installation. The treated wood was the dry type, good quality species, but not southern yellow pine. A decade later, good as new. The environment was an old house basement where the original steps had rotted away. Later a project came up needing treated wood and a wet treated (and shipped) fast growing Nebraska jack pine was the source. No finish or adhesive of any type worked on that, although the nails did hold fairly well. Bottom line, you have a critical application and with the many grades of treated wood out there, you may be lucky or maybe not. Experimenting with leftover scraps would be well advised to get at least a hint of how later painting might perform. Pro paint stores and customer service at the wood suppliers headquarters might be helpful. Then there's the world renowned USDA facility at U of Wisconsin/Madison with thousands of publications on timber related topics. Good luck.
Joe
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Buy a moisture meter then you can paint or stain when its ready
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wrote:

Ideally, the wood should be at 10% moisture content. Obviously, it will take longer to dry in Michagan than Arizona.

You dont need to seal PT wood, but it will last longer if you do. Just sealing the end-grain is time well-spent in the long run to avoid early rot.

You can probably put the treads on now.
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