Painting Pressure Treated Wood

I am installing new fascia boards using PT 2x12 - it is attached to the ends of the roof framing and is rested on the other end by an aluminum screen enclosure.
I would like to paint the fascia boards to match the color of the soffit, but when I did some research on the net it seems several links mentioned that PR lumber should not be painted due to high moisture content and will cause the paint to not adhere. Is there a way around this?
Also the installer who replaced the fascia board did all the cutting outdoor inside the screen enclosure and lots and lots of saw dust went into the swimming pool which is right inside the screen area. I read that the saw dust contains toxins and is irritable to skins, so if it's floating all over my pool water should I be worried?
Thanks,
MC
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Time. wait until next year.

If the pool skimmer cleans it up you should be OK. I'd not want the dust getting up my nose or in my eyes though.
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I guess in addition to the actual skin contact, I am concerned with whether the arsenic agent in the saw dust from the treated wood would dissolve in the pool water and could cause harm?
I read that "Arsenic is a component in the most prevalent wood preservative formulation in use. This formulation is known as CCA, which stands for chromated copper arsenic. Deep penetration of the water borne formulation is achieved by application under high pressure. The most common formulation results in a wood concentration of the Cr, Cu, and As of between 0.1-0.2%. Higher levels of arsenic from between 0.4-1.8% are employed for wood foundation and marine applications. Millions of board feet of CCA wood are produced each year, where it is used in the construction of decks, picnic tables, playground equipment, highway sound barriers, telephone poles and docks."
Will the dust poison the pool water I wonder.
MC
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call the wood manufacturer and ask. the worker was really dumb,
treated wood never accepts paint well, probably better to cover with alumnimum, with baked on finish
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Dilution is your friend. I doubt much would dissolve but a few rain storms and the water will be diluted. I don't know if there is a simple test strip for arsenic in drinking water.
If in doubt, invite the in-laws for a pool party and let them go in first.
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wrote in message

In-laws, hmm....
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I have had good luck painting PT lumber. I use an oil base primer which is more trouble but adheres very well. You can let the wood dry for a while after it is intalled if you are worried. Then paint at your leisure from a secure scaffold.
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wrote:

How long do you wait? A week or three months?
Thanks!
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treated wood PERMANETELY expands and contracts more than regular wood, note it splits and barberpolls, twists etc.
you should ONLY STAIN PT wood, never paint it because of these issues.
use a solid color stain after leaving woood age / weather 6 months
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In my opinion there is no need to wait at all where an oil-based paint is used. On the other hand, PT wood need not have any paint at all. You choose.
So.....It's all up to you and what you want or need. Do it whenever the weather is nice and it's convenient for you. I also use oils for the top coat. They adhere so well that there is no worry for the paint. It will not fail.
If it were me, I would paint the boards on sawhorses and then install, much easier than painting from a scaffold and gives you a chance to prime the backside.
I know there's a guy who says never paint PT. I'm sure he means well. Any wood can check or split. That don't mean the paint has failed. It can be touched up or re-painted, no problem. If you want paint then you can have it.
Oil-base paint, that's the solution. Adheres to anything and gives you a better finish, IMHO. The typical big box only stocks latex so go to a real paint store. Just don't forget the mineral spirits or paint thinner for clean up!
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Wait a month, prime with OB, top coat with latex. I don't believe the newer pressure treated is made with CCA. Even if it is a bit of dust in a whole pool would be negligible. Don't over think the issue.
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DONT PAINT PT WOOD, just had a friend replace her deck, mechanically it was fine but her hubby had painted it, it always looked bad, no matter who and what was painted on it.
use solid color matching stain after the boards have dried and weathered, or be prepared to replace the boards again, it will be terrible trying to get paint to stick over time.
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wrote:

DONT PAINT PT WOOD, just had a friend replace her deck, mechanically it was fine but her hubby had painted it, it always looked bad, no matter who and what was painted on it.
use solid color matching stain after the boards have dried and weathered, or be prepared to replace the boards again, it will be terrible trying to get paint to stick over time.
All my window trim and sills and all fascia boards are pressure treated. Never had any paint issues with the PT that I didn't have with the pine clapboards. Good oil base primer with latex over it, and it lasts 10 years. The PT doesn't peel, crack or fade any sooner than the pine.
For my PT deck, I use milk paint (shaker paint) on it, and while that will fade in a few years, there's no peeling or streaking. The reason I don't use that on the house is that it only works on raw wood, and I'm not going to strip the whole house down to bare wood when there's no need to.
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