Painting lining wallpaper

Having stripped & repapered my kitchen with a good quality lining paper, I put a coat of emulsion on the paper & the paint seemed to lift the paper especially at the edges, most of the paper has gone back to the wall ok as the paint has dried, but quite a few edges are still lifted from the wall. Anyone have a good solution to keep the paper flat to the wall.
Thanks
Rich
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Glue the edges back down with a premixed wallpaper adhesive.
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Hugh Glass wrote:

And roll the seams.
R
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Have very little wallpapering experience...
- but -
Have a lot of experience with lifting wallpaper. It was in a house I am redoing. Wallpaper someone painted over. A mess. All bubbled. Can't put latex anything over wallpaper or if wallpaper is under the surface. Solution is to cover wallpaper with oil base primer and paint.
What is emulsion? Is it water based?
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millt wrote:

are using water-based paint and it softened the paste. Saw the same effect once on regular wallpaper. Emulsion?
Solvent-based primer/sealer would be the solution, I suppose. After you paste down the lifted edges. You can mix up some glue, brush it across the lifted edges so that it is forced under the paper - press it down, wipe, dry, tape down ever so carefully to it lays flat until dry.
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After you glue it flat and it dries a week or so reprime in oil, if you had used oil you would not have re-activated the glue.
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wrote:

Many thanks to everyone who replied.
Im from the UK & take it that most in here are from across the big Pond in the USA. Emulsion for those who don't know what it is , is a water based paint used for painting walls, & wallpaper, so I guess going on the answers in here, its the water in the emulsion thats lifting the paper. I also assume that the cheaper emulsions contain a highr level of water, so maybe thats my problem? Oil based primer seems to be the way to go & have read that a product called Kilz is a good one? although I'm unsure if thats availiable here in the UK. Will have to search out & find some good oil based primer. Just for the record, what is solvent based primer??
Another possible solution that a few have mentioned is prime the wall first with a PVA sealer( a wood glue & water mix) but this would still be water based! so Im unsure if this would work or not. Thanks for the mention of the edge roller as this seems to be a great idea.
Once again, I was thrilled to get so many take there time & reply to my post. You're all very kind & I thank you all
Best wishes
Rich
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millt wrote:

If the liner paper was put up with heavy duty vinyl wallpaper adhesive, as they all should be, and you waited a couple of days before priming, the liner paper shouldn't have lifted with either oil based or water based paint.
How long did you wait after applying the liner paper before painting? Did you use a primer or did you go straight to the finish paint?
R
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clipped

"Oil." "Alkyd." Something that isn't water :o)

What brand is your paper? Does it have instructions for coating it?

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liner to achieve a smooth wall surface to paint ? There are basically two types of liner. One is made to go under another wallcovering so it appears smooth. This material is particularly porous and not suitable for painting. A second type of liner is usually referred to as lining canvas. It is made to take a coat of paint directly. Usually it is a fabric backed type along the lines of a brand called Sanitas. I've seen some lately that is paperbacked and prepasted. I believe you may have put up the wrong type if the ultimate goal was a paintable surface. The situation is salvageable if you prime what you have up now with a primer/sealer that is not water based. That should keep it from lifting. Two coats of this should do it. Then top coat with the finish of choice using two thin coats as opposed to a heavier one. FWIW YMMV
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