Painting Ceiling in Kitchen

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J. Clarke wrote:

Have you washed kitchen ceilings/walls that had flat paint on them? In my experience, there is no comparison for cleanability between flat and semi.
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In addition to all the other good advice, be sure you are allowing the paint to adequately dry. I have noticed that latex sometimes seems blotchy for quite a while but finally evens out.
Don Young
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Did you ever read any instruction label and follow it , or do you just post stupid questions. You did, NO degreaseing , NO wash, NO sand, it might all peel in 2 years in sheets, nothing like a homeowner hack knowing nothing, what a pain in the ass you guys are. Its too late to do it right, so slap on more till yr happy or strip the bitch bare.
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ransley wrote:

Lighten up, dear. I learned to read labels after my first paint job with Sears paint....It was such crap that I went to a real paint store, found Ben Moore by dumb luck, and learned about real paint.
FWIW, I use only alkyd semi in bath and kitchen. Clean-up is not that big a deal, and if I don't care to repaint for 20 years, BM is good for it.
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wrote:

I was stupidly incredulous when I realized this one guy I know, labeled gifted in school, didn't read paint labels so he wasn't paying attention to how long paint dried before applying second coats. I told him that every brand and type of paint had different dry times and that one would be well advised to read the label to ascertain the needed elapsed time before painting over the first coat. He said he thought it didn't matter as long as the paint was dry to the touch, and I told him that these companies spend untold dollars testing their products in order to provide proper use instructions, and we pay for that and should read the labels to benefit. How else would you learn that Home Depot's crap paint Behr needs 4 hours between coats whereas Benjamin Moore only needs 2? Unfortunately he painted our bathroom while we were gone on vacation as a return of favor before I realized his idiocy, so I'll be curious to how long the paint will hold up. It does happen to be high end Sherwin Williams stuff, so it may be ok in the end.
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I've been painting with the "dry to the touch" for the past 50+ years and have never run into a problem with wall or ceiling paint. It is not possible for the paint company to give an accurate time period for re-coating. Temperature, humidity, surface material, thickness of the coat, all come into play.
One painting tip I learned many years ago is that good paint is worth the few extra bucks.
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"KLS" wrote

Mom used them by preference with almost every house we 'flipped'. It was a decent coverage, decent price, and long lasting. Use the higher end of their line and I've not heard bad of them. You can even reliably use their water based latex over previous oil based 'unknown paint brand' with just a little scuffing from sand paper.
At least, you used to be able to ;-) BTDT some 50 times but not recently.
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When painting anything never let the lap lines dry out as you move across the wall or ceiling. IOW always lap over a recently wet area.
Use the best roller covers.
For ceilings use an adjustable stick (not a ladder) this way you can long stroke the laps better with your feet on the floor.
Try a different brand of paint if all else fails, or go down to eggshell or flat finish if using semi-gloss.
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"car crash" wrote

Smile, Live and learn! You got lots of good advice here. Now to fix it, sand lightly where the streaks show (lightly, dont rub off the drywall paper!) then prime.
I'd also upscale the paint type. The one you used is prone to blotching. Benjamin Moore is a decent one that will cover better. 2 thin coats work much better than 1 thick coat which is probably where the problem started.
Oh, on flat vs semi-gloss, I prefer a semi-gloss washable for a kitchen. You wont have to repaint so often and hood or no, some grease will travel in the air over time.
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I have recently painted ceilings throughout my house and don't have the problem you encountered. I start with Zinsser's 1-2-3 Bullseye water-based flat primer, the cover with two coats of a high quality ceiling latex where I need flat paint -- and latex semi-gloss in the bathrooms and kitchen.

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[snip]

Having not actually watched you paint, I can only guess, but it sounds like you put the initial coat on too thick, and any coats you put on top will do nothing to knock down the original ridges. As others have already said, you're going to have to sand out the ridges and repaint.
Don't skimp on the roller covers - yeah, you might not get more than a few uses out of one before it starts to shed fibers, but it's still worth the peace of mind and lack of frustration to shell out a few extra dollars and maybe if you take care of them (and don't use tomato- soup red or tuscan orange - trust me) they'll last you for a while.
And don't buy that line o' crap on those roller covers treated with Teflon. They don't clean any easier than "regular" rollers and they do seem to shed fibers faster. Don't just randomly choose a package at the Big Box Store, but go to a genuine paint store and ask what they'd recommend as far as quality, lasting rollers.
One thing no one has mentioned yet, but I've found helpful, is not to roll in one direction, but change it up - up and down, left and right, at a 36.2 degree angle. My experience has shown I'm less likely to leave marks or miss a spot if I do that.
The gauge of not rolling to large an area (and getting the paint thin) or too small an area and making it too thick...well, that only comes with lots and lots of practice, and me? I'm still an apprentice...
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Hello,
Lots of good advice already given. I would add that you lightly go over a freshly painted 4 X 3 section with the roller BEFORE reloading it with paint. Do this light rolling in one direction only for all the sections. This helps to feather in each section. This also helps control the texture and helps hide lap and roller marks.
Good Luck
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