Paint - How Much to Buy

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Doug Miller wrote:

I didn't say that. As a matter of fact, you CAN'T put PAM in paint. Oil and water do not mix. I actually said to spray (a small amount of) PAM in the container. By floating atop the paint, it acts as a barrier to the oxygen remaining in the can. Ever heard the expression: "Oil on troubled waters"?

I wear glasses. Cling wrap does work. Go find another assumption.

From the Better Homes and Gardens website:
"You can clean water-based paint from brushes and paint pads in 10 seconds:
" The fabric softener is a surfactant -- it actually makes the water wetter, so it can more easily dissolve paint." http://www.bhg.com/decorating/paint/how-tos/how-to-clean-paint-brushes /

Could be... I'm not a professional painter. But I do try to study on a project before rushing willy-nilly into it. I suggest that you, too, could benefit from research on an idea before expressing an opinion (Opinion "deeply held belief not based on facts") instead of making more assumptions.
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HeyBub wrote:

I assume that is true but any detergent is a surfactant. I mention that merely because people are more likely to have easy access to that than they are to fabric softener.
--

dadiOH
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No, but you're recommending to put it ON paint...

... and now how do you propose to get rid of that layer of PAM next time you want to use the paint??

Depends on your definition of "does work", I suppose, and how clearly you think it's necessary to see in order to do a good job of painting.
Maybe you just have low standards.

Bullshit.
How do they propose removing the fabric softener from the brush afterwards?
Latex paint rinses out of brushes just fine with nothing more than warm water, leaving nothing behind that might interfere with the next paint job.

Nor even a competent amateur, apparently. One thing is clear: you haven't done very much of it.
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Doug Miller wrote:

I don't. It's not necessary to remove it.

I can detect virtually no difference with or without the cling-wrap. Have you tried it? Or are you making just making another another argumentative claim?

Let's see; who to believer - Better Homes & Gardens or an un-vetted newsgroup poster who hasn't tried any of the suggestions?
Let me think...

Duh! With warm water. Have you ever cleaned a paint brush?

No it doesn't, or at least not as easily as with fabric softner, and I'm speaking as one who has actually cleaned paint brushes used with latex paint. Further, after using fabric softener, the brushes certainly smell better.

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So, what then? You're going to paint PAM on your wall? More proof you have no clue.
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Doug Miller wrote:

And what is YOUR clue? Did come to you in a dream? Did you learn of it thru a note in the bottom of a Cracker-Jack box? Perhaps a message explaining the concept that you studied with the help of your Hopalong Cassidy Secret Decoder Ring?
The PAM layer is like FOUR MOLECULES thick! (I exaggerate for emphasis).
Look, dude, either comment from experience or cite a contrary source. I, for one, am not interested in your heartfelt belief based on neither authority nor lack of knowledge, especially when your ignorance and acidity combine to impugn my suggestions and motives.
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Try this line from YOUR post: "Oil and water don't mix".

Speaking of ignorance and acidity...
It's become quite clear that: (a) you copy-pasted a list of tips you found online somewhere, rather than posting advice and knowledge you had gained through actual experience, in order to appear that you know more about the topic than you actually do (not the first time you've done something like this, BTW)
and
(b) you're embarrassed to have been caught at it.

Not the first time you've done that, either.

Oh, like you *have* been "comment[ing] from experience"? Riiiiiight.

I haven't impugned your motives at all, until this post.
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Doug Miller wrote:

## No, everything I posted was originally composed by me. This another one of your assumption. Had I merely copy/pasted some exposition from an internet source, it should be trivial for you to find it. Merely take the statement - or a part of it - surround it with double-quotes, and hand it to Google.
## Please tell us what you find.

## "Caught at it?" So far, all we have is your claim. A claim with no proof.

## Absolutely. Plus repeating information from knowledgeable sources.

## I stand corrected - you have not criticized my motives. But, whatever, I still challenge you to cite a source that is contrary to the information I posted.
## That you have not done so, nor claimed experience or experimentation, indicates you are simply being a contrarian.
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OK, so it came out of a book instead of online. My basic point still stands: it's something you read somewhere, not something you have any actual knowledge of.
Go away now.
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Doug Miller wrote:

So, you were wrong.
Yes, I got the tips from a book - and I made use of every one of them I listed here. You, however, have offered no contrary evidence, either from your own experience or by referral to others. Methinks you are just being disagreeable for disagreeable's sake.
I could be wrong. You can settle this hash by CLAIMING you've found an error, via experience, in one or more of the tips OR by citing an apparent expert who disagrees with any of the tips I posted.
In sum, I STILL recommend to the novice painter, such as the OP, that they consult a book on painting before they begin.
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Two posts back, you said you composed them yourself.

About where you got them from, yes. About the fact that it's just something you read somewhere, not something you know from actual experience, no, I was completely right about that.
And you lied when you said you composed them yourself.
The only part that you got right was "oil and water don't mix". Read that a few times until you figure out why putting vegetable oil in a water-based paint might not be the best idea ever.
Run along now.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Your comments are interesting. Most of the hints I offered - from one of the painting-tips books - came with a "why" attached. Your disagreements came with no basis, just contrariness.
If you can back up your disagreements, I'd be pleased to hear your side of the various arguments. If, however, you are limited to screaming: "Liar! Liar!," spare us.
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clipped

For people who like flat interior paint, semi looks like s--- and highlights ever bump or flaw in the surface.
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wrote:

color. I measured (three walls have those tall vaulted ceilings) -- but as best I can tell -

You'll need about 4 gallons depending on just how you apply it. Given that the color is close, one coat should it if you don't miss any spots.
There are better places to buy paint though. Sometimes the local store will be cheaper and have better quality brands, service, advice.
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I need to paint my great room - hall - and dinette. Its all painted the same color. I measured (three walls have those tall vaulted ceilings) -- but as best I can tell - the area measures 1441 sq.ft. I have thrown away the sales slips for the paint we bought - years ago - and I have no idea how many gallons. It will be flat paint, as close to the original color as possible. Hopefully, one coat will cover it. How many gallons do I need? My late husband always bought the paint - well, I bought it, but he told me how many gallons to buy. Any help would be appreciated. Will probably shop at Home Depot or Lowes. Thanks.
About 4-5 gallons depending how thick you roll it..If I'm going for the one coat and gone I put it on pretty good..2 coats I go thinner..I would go for the 5 gallon bucket to insure uniformity but I lose money if I have to re-do it at my expense because of some nimrod at the paint counter got one a little off...As a general rule it is Flat for the ceiling , satin or eggshell for the walls and semi-gloss for trim...But hey it's your place..Get some light weight One Time Spackle and touch up the nail holes and dings and hit the touch ups with the brush as you are cutting in...Crank up the radio and have at it..On the high walls start at the top and work you way down after the ceiling is done..HTH...
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