Ozone Generators - Anyone with experience?

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I'm considering using an ozone generator to rid rental units of odors from mold, cooking, whatever.
Has anyone here done this? Does it work? What unit did you buy? Would you recommend that or another?
My intention is to run the generator on a timer that will shut it off some hours before I expect to return. Thus, the fact that ozone isn't good for the lungs will not be a factor.
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Consider the fact that ozone is an aggressive oxiding agent that can affect clored drapes, rugs and the like and plan accordingly. IIRC, Consumer Reports had an article on the matter some time ago that might be helpful, and of course Google and Wikipedia will be a good sources. Deposited cooking grease on walls ought to washed off since the ozone might just harden it into a stubborn mess, for example. Over all, sounds like you're headed in right drection. HTH
Joe
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I've some experience with EBay units, claimed output 100 mg/hr and 400 mg/hr. These will not (at this output, anyway) work any great magic. For a place that is in decent condition to begin with, they will remove odors, but there will be some faint residual odor of the ozone use (probably of something oxidized, since ozone doesn't hang around for too long). Don't know about cigarette smoke, but they're OK with cooking odors. After using them, a fan in the window for a few minutes will complete the job.
If you can get at the actual thing, such as bleach the mold, steam- clean the carpet, or wash the drapes, you will have the best result. The ozone will take care of the residual stuff. I also have an electrostatic filter in my HVAC in line with a fiberglass, and for a couple of weeks after it is washed, it keeps the house smelling good with the little ozone it produces. I think ozone is a good preventive measure. It will not wash away a apartment dweller's slobbishness in one application.
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My take is that ozone generators are out of favor compare to an air filter. Why not use an air filter powered by a fan? Commonly available, they are proven performers compared to ozone generators.
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Well, the air filter is the equivalent of "airing out" the place. The ozone is supposed to attack the mold and whatever where is sits on the surface and the floor and walls.
That's the theory. I was hoping that someone here had already taken the plunge.

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John Gilmer wrote:

Too much O3 is harmful. Look at commercial grade neg. ion generator. Reall good ones cost quite a bit.
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Don't they just stick all the crud to the walls, furniture, and rugs?
Bob
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The folks who make ozone generators claim just that: negative ions just "glue" the "bugs" and stuff in place rather than destroy them.

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Here is a link for you: www.medallionhealthyhomes.com/link.htm
I have personally witnessed the ozone shock treatment here in Ontario Canada. It was performed on a local tavern when our laws changed to no smoking in order to rid the stench of nicotine. I was completely amazed at the results. The only 'smell' was that of the outdoors after a severe thunderstorm. U.V. ozone generators capable of increasing the levels of O3 to the required level are very very expensive and dangerous (respirator required) and I doubt that any consumer scale generator will give you the results you're looking for. For 3-400 dollars you can have this performed in about 5-6 hours by a pro.
Just my $0.02
Gary
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wrote:

Well the one I am starting to focus on uses corona discharge rather than UV. Cost about $400. I figure I can use it on two rental properties (separated by some 50 miles) and still have it for home use and for the "next time."
Your report has encouraged me.
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we have rented ozone generators to many people like yourself hoping to eliminate odors, mold, etc. you may wish to rent a generator locally and test it out before purchasing. And, of course, if you do purchase, you will find that a refrubished generator is much cheaper and as reliable.
paul snipped-for-privacy@fin-tek.com
John Gilmer Wrote: > "gerdman" snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote in message

--
Paul77

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Dear John Gilmer:

Make sure: - the ozone generator makes ozone in air, not in pure oxygen (this would increase the flammability of your unit, ala. Apollo 1). - the humidity is raised in the unit prior to adding the ozone (its net potency and effectiveness will increase, as well as shortening its half life). - ozone is heavier than air, so add a sacrificial box fan (or three) to the space to mix things up and distribute. - add no more ozone than necessary. Ozone will attack padding in carpet, insulation on power cords, hoses (such as on dishwashers, and washing machines), and even insulation on hose wiring if applied indiscriminantly.
Corona-based generators will make the most, fastest, so that you can dose appropriately, and turn it off, without adding a lot of gas to the space. UV-based will take (much) longer, but help prevent you from overdosing (by inducing impatience, most likley).
Brand unimportant, just make sure that it has an air dryer, not an oxygen concentrator inside. And the air compressor / blower should draw from outside air, not inside the space. Components upstream of where ozone is made are in general intolerant of ozone being sucked back into the unit.
David A. Smith
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http://www.air-zone.com/xt6000.html
The above is the company/model that has caught my eye. If you have some spare time can you take a look and offer some comments?
Thanks.
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Dear John Gilmer:

Looks OK up front.
Their "salespeak" has very little to do with real chemistry. In an air stream with humidity, NO2, N2O, and N2O5 are made and no salesman can stop it from happening.
3000 mg/hr might take a couple of hours to treat a reasonably sized home, depending on the contamination level. You'd need to develop a feel for how much a unit would require.
It appears to be "hardened" against reingestion of ozone, so the ozone unit could be locked inside while you go elsewhere. Still need mixing and distribution fans, however.
Take note of their cleaning instructions, especially if you do let it breathe humid air (like you and I are used to). The plates will accumulate something that devolves into "fuming nitric acid"... very bad stuff.
I forgot to mention, ozone is really good at attacking the kinds of adhesive used on shelf / drawer liners. No help with wallpaper adhesives, I'm afraid. ;>)
David A. Smith
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wrote:

I would hope that "diffusion" who get it around a room. The furnace fan would take the O3 about the rest of the house if I place it near the intake.

Oh, boy!
For the next month or so (as long as the cold weather holds) the place will be near "bone dry" as I can get it. But I get your message to not use it when it's damp outside.

Darn!
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John Gilmer wrote:

You're going through the exact same discovery steps in your investigation of ozone generators that I did some while back. Ozone generators are touted as being all that and a bag of chips, but they have some pretty serious problems and substantial limitations. I've had excellent results dealing with the mold and odor issues by using using an ionizing air purifier and controlling the humidity with a dehumidifier.
R
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Dear John Gilmer:

That might work.
I used to work for an ozone generator manufacturer. They had a 25 pound per day (on air) ozone generator drop its output hose off of the intake to the ozone destruct and start pumping to the room at large. On a weekend. Unattended. Any rubber below about 4 feet had to be immediately replaced, inclusive of forklift tires and compressed air hoses. Anything above this "4 foot" was largely unaffected. "Diffusion" of a gas *significantly* heavier than air cannot be depended on.
Nature doesn't care what we *want* to happen.

You misunderstood. The ozone generator should *breathe* dry air to prevent NOx formation and fuming nitric production. But ozone in humid air is most potent / useful, and decays to safety most quickly. This means the ozone should be pumped *into* a humid space, not just locked in the space. You *can* do it either way, but "locking it in" is less effective and more cleanup for you.

I think that future civilzations will find the remains of wallpaper still adhered, and consider this "wall paintings".
You might be better off to hire a remediation firm to do this. At least get quotes, so you know how much coin is involved, and how much time will have to be worth.
David A. Smith
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Dear John Gilmer:

I used to deal with Pacific Ozone Technology for small ozone generators. Should you be interested, you could: * get a compressed air cylinder with regulator (welding gas suppliers have these, need "instrument grade" air). * get a GA10 ozone generator (about US $4000 this year). www.pacificozone.com (You can ask for Stuart Smith, no relation to myself.) * duct the ozone produced from the "back yard" through a crack in a partially open door or window to the intake of the unit's A/C via teflon tubing (Ryan Herco or equivalent will sell you 50 feet for not too much money). * apply a simple timer to the power cord of the unit.
Benefits of this assemblage include: - should any timer fail, the limited gas supply will prevent overdosing. (The GA10, I *think*, shuts down on low gas flow.) - since oil-free, dry air is supplied, the unit will not have to be internally cleaned. - since ozone is made in air, the net flammability of the rental unit is not increased during processing.
I think you'll find that remediators really do earn their keep.
David A. Smith
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On Sat, 3 Mar 2007 09:18:35 -0500, "John Gilmer"

I heard that OZone can agravate problems with those who have breathing issues. Like Asthma.
Any truth in this?
tom @ www.FatHubby.com
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I would not be at all surprised.
Some restaurants use low power ozone generators in occupied areas but the small amount of ozone is quickly "neutralized" by the kitchen odors.
When a truly powerful ozone generator is use the general idea is to put it on a timer so that it turns off 1/2 to 1 hour beform anyone gets back home. If someone is sensitive, I suppose the time could be increased.
But I also understand that "killer" ozone levels kills the stuff that also makes asthma worse. I guess the best approach is to run the machine just after the amthma victim leaves the home for the day and give the O3 plenty of time to decay.

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