outdoor copper gas line

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This is Turtle.
No Davey Boy , The only problem I have with you is you are tring to pass yourself off as a HVAC professional in the newsgroups and if a professial hvac person would just listen to you. He will know your not in the trade because of the off the wall answers you give to hvac or Refrigeration questions. I might add some of the Home owner posting here knows more about the hvac business than you do. If a person will lie about something like this. I just will take it he will lie about other things as well to keep the newsgroup people to thinking your in the trade. One lie leeds to another lie and then somewhere in all of this you can get someone hurt by what you tell them or lie to them about. Your respectiable speaking ideals on the newsgroups is just a ploy to cover up your trolling on the newsgroups.
Now as to Ken having some social or personal problem , it has nothing to do with your lying on the newsgroups or trolling on the newsgroups. I think Ken does have a problem with your lying on the newsgroups and passing yourself off as a hvac professional.
Davey , You have to be respectiable yourself before tring to change the respectiable speech on a newsgroup or no one will listen to you. Trolling and lying on the newsgroups will never get you there.
TURTLE
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Acceptable, and professionally acceptable due to future issues is another thing.
If you had a clue, you would understand why you DONT use copper or galvanized..
Read the International Fuel Code book as of ohh.....the last 10 years??

Funny, those same public that can look at how we treat you, agree that you are an idiot...

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I located the Florida Code for gas lines and L and K schedule copper >IS< acceptable, but there is a susbtance that has to be under a certain amount per volume of gas. The code website isn't pull up now so I can't quote it. I don't know if the natural gas coming to my house qualifies as being under these amounts however.
The orgiinal question was still never answered by anyway, what can I use to coat the copper pipe to protect from exterior elements that won't corrode the pipe. If anything, I just want to paint the exposed areas to match the damn house. Can I use water based paint?

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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (HVAC IsFun) wrote in message

I've seen both black and galvanized used. There is no question that black pipe, used properly is absolutely ok. As I understand it, there is an issue with using either galvanized or copper. Natural gas has a chemical added to it so that it will smell and can be detected. That chemical reacts with copper or zinc, causing corrosion. In the case of copper, the pipe fails. In the case of zinc, I believe it results in flaking, which can cause jets to clog.
Why anyone would choose a chemical that could cause problems like that is another story.
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This is Turtle.
Few Words ---------------- Dave ------------------ Troll.
TURTLE
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Hey Evan! I had Amerigas bury a 500-gallon Propane gas tank in my yard last year. They ran 1/2" Copper tubing to my two fireplaces inside the house and my barbecue grill on the deck behind the house as well as to my pool heater on the opposite end of my house. They said they use copper pipe for this application all the time. They hand dug a three or four inch deep trench to bury the copper pipe. I have accidentally dug against the pipe planting some bushes recently but I didn't puncture the pipe. I like metal pipe much better than plastic. My house had some of that black abs plastic piping for the water line that just started developing leaks. I replaced it with copper piping too. Most municipal water departments will tell you they feel that copper is the most durable pipe for water lines. Of course, anything will deteriorate over time and some body will probably have to repair the pipe you are putting in twenty years from now!
Regards, Bill
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This is PROPANE (LP) vs. Natural Gas (mostly methane) copper tube and flare fittings are common w/ LP. In my part of the country black iron (or some plastics -- fusion welded or persed w/ o-ringed (?) taps -- for the utility's distribution main piping) threaded or welded (latter primarily for larger commercial services) is used, not galv. Some CSST (corrogated stainless) is used too. Believe buried blk iron is overcoated w/ bituminous coating for external moisture protection.
The original poster never said whether it was LP or NG (though I gathered maybe the latter). In any case th elocal code enforcement person/body should be able to answer questions -- just call and ask.
For water is a differant ballgame than fuel gases -- as long as water is not excessively acidic it, installed correctly, will last a long time.
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