Our water heater is 14 years old - replace it?

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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

No, you can do it. There are devices to make the job easier.
For example, instead of direct connections to the heater, you can use sooper-strong, steel-braided hoses. This greatly minimizes the effort required to get the heater connected. Same with the gas line.
All in all, there are two water connections, one gas connection, and one blowout-valve connection.
With the money you save on installation labor, you can get a better quality product, buy a couple of wrenches you might need, the aforementioned hoses, and still have enough left for a two-week vacation in Monaco.
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I'd check the code in your area first - assuming you care about being compliant.
My grandmother had a stove replaced in her apartment in Massachusetts and had to pay extra to have it "hard-piped" because the flex pipes were no longer code. It may have been an local apartment-code thing, I can't say.
I will say that I have never seen a water heater installed with flex hoses (for the gas *or* water) but my experience doesn't mean it's not legal.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Good point. I'm in Houston. We don't even have zoning, let alone code requirements for anything done within (or attached to) the four walls. For example, a couple of years ago, my son and I replaced the 200-Amp service/breaker box. That worked so well - hardly any smoke - that we repeated the project at his house.
I did check with the city - no permits or inspections required.
Anyway, you're right. If one lives under a pokenose local government, it's best to check with the factotums first. Else one could end up in the Gulag.
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On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 06:10:03 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

One thing that IS required now in KW area is a temperature control valve - mixes hot and cold to prevent outlet temp from the heater exceding 49C (120 F) - which by the time it reaches the far end of the house is just over luke-warm.
Another reason to DIY - the licenced plumber is not allowed to do the install without that cranky valve.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Evidently you haven't been in areas subject to seismic activity. Flexible connectors are *required*.
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on 11/19/2008 11:50 PM Bob said the following:

Also required by some jurisdictions whether or not earthquakes are a problem, like where I live. A moisture trap is also required in the line.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On 11/18/08 05:59 pm I wrote:

I've seen people giving good reports of A O Smith units. I understand that Sears/Kenmore water heaters are made by A O Smith, so any reason to avoid Kenmore if the price is right? -- and install it myself.
Perce
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wrote:

home depot has better prices than sears, kenmore is just a marketing name. sears says we want a hot water tank, stove fridge with these features, and the manufacturer says heres the price.
sears sold the craftsman name, they are now just a licensee, kenmore name is on the auction block, sears sold off everything non retail, and is starved for cash because of the economic dump. they may not survive
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On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 05:18:29 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Home Despot may not survive either - and they also buy by price. A lot of what they carry is at best second rate too.
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On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 22:20:43 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

They deserve not to survive with such a bigoted company founder wishing death on potential customers:
http://oxdown.firedoglake.com/diary/1872
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

A couple of years ago, we had to replace our 66-gal. electric, and the cheapest source was Sears., $380, or at least $50 cheaper than Lowe's and Home Depot, neither which had the product in stock.
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A couple of years ago, we had to replace our 66-gal. electric, and the cheapest source was Sears., $380, or at least $50 cheaper than Lowe's and Home Depot, neither which had the product in stock.
*********************************************
I wonder what a real plumbing supply would have charged.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

until they're open sometime when I can get to their counter, I'll never know. That's probably a big reason why the Big Boxes are so successful, as awful as they are.
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
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Point taken. but . . . . . . . . When I needed a circulator, the big box stores were $65. Supply New England was $42. I was able to wait.
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I sent this before, but I don't see it:
On 11/18/08 11:43 pm I wrote:

I've been reading various installation/operation manuals online and see that the pipe from the T&P valve should go to a floor drain. We don't have a floor drain in the basement utility room where the water heater and HVAC is located; the present overflow pipe has a bucket under it. The sump (with pump) is two rooms away. There is a wimpy little pump that pumps the a/c condensate to the sump via a skinny plastic tube that runs up and above the suspended ceiling.
Any recommendations?
Perce
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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

An alternative configuration is to run the output of the T&P valve up into the attic, across, and out the soffit.
You don't want to be around the output of the sucker when it blows.
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On 11/19/08 10:38 am HeyBub wrote:

People tell me that that would be a code violation:: T&P valve must not discharge uphill.
Perce
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That's true. There's also a limit to the number of bends in that line. Mine are dumping on the floor for that reason as well, although I have thought about just ignoring the code and piping them into the deep sink. (I could do it easily; just not without having too many bends.) I have a small catch container under each one; if I see any moisture in one I will replace T&P valve immediately.
nate
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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Hmm. Both of mine (I have a duplex) go up and over, then back down inside the brick veneer. There is an exhaust pipe about 1' above the ground (with an elbow pointing down).
Your observation does, however, make sense in that any water trapped in the pipe may linger around the valve causing corrosion.
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As an electrician when I see an electrical problem or hazard at a customer's house I will point it out due to concerns for their safety. It doesn't matter to me if I correct the problem or if they have someone else do it. Two professionals gave you their opinion and you think that they just need the business. You could wait until the water heater fails and then you will be dealing with potential flooding, no hot water and no time to shop around for a good price. I would start getting some quotes now and get it done.
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