OT: Voltage Converter for France

Page 2 of 2  
wrote:

What's wrong with drying your hair in the shower? Isn't that where it gets the wettest?

When my father wanted to put more outlets in my bedroom about 1953, he was not cheap and I'm sure he hired an electrician. The electrician drilled a hole just above the baseboard from their walk-in closet and ran lampcord along the top of it to two surface-mount outlets in my room, plugged into my parents' room.
I'm dying to go back there and see if it's still wired that way 57 years later. I wouldn't be surprised. And I'll bet it hasn't caused any problems, either.

There's too much other stuff to do, like tweeting and Usenet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

AFAIK, AFCI's have never been required or used in bathrooms, which current code requires GFCI.

I agree. Also, I don't see the big beef about putting a GFCI in a hairdryer. They are cheap and cost less today in real dollars than they did 30 years ago. I'll bet if you found out the incremental cost of adding the GFCI it's very small compared to the overall cost of the unit. And if it makes it safer, I don't see any real issue. New homes have GFCIs. But think about some little kid living in some cheap, old housing, with parents that aren't too bright....

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/9/2011 11:24 AM, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

In the US and Canada the insulation is rated at 600 volts because we use 120 for our outlets except things like a dryer or stove. In the UK the insulation is rated at 1,000 volts because they are using 250 for outlets. I like my smaller space saving plugs better. ^_^
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 09 Apr 2011 10:52:47 -0500, The Daring Dufas

It is amazing isn't it how big they are. Most of ours are a trifle bigger than the minimum. I have devices that can plug in 3 items side by side in about an inch and a half.
BTW, I got my first 240 volts shock a couple months ago. With the old electric stove that needed the thermostat, I'd taken off the back cover to look at the stat, then not put it back on when I pushed the oven back into place, to continue using the top burner. When I went to pull it out again, it was hard to find a place to get the right grip on it until BINGO! Definitely more than 110. No burn on my hand in either case.
(I had had 2000 about 30 years ago. From a tv. I ended up across the room with my shoulder dislocated for the first time in 10 years.)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Target has a kit with 5 different adapters for $8. Made by Embark. Each adapter has a list of countries/regions where they will work written on the adapter.
They also carry an Embark All-In-One converter/adapter for $30. It's one unit that contains a converter and "slide-out" prongs so you can choose the configuration you'll need.
I bought both, but I'll be returning the converter since she won't be needing it.
I'll warn her about the pick-pockets, although for the most part she'll be traveling with "adult supervision", even though she's 18. She'll be spending most of her time with the family of the girl that stayed with us last fall. Still, proper warnings will be issued.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Great experiences for all involved!!
--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have both and travel internationally extensively. The slide out prong unit is mildly useful if you are travelling through multiple countries as it saves you from having to keep track of the baggie with 10 separate plug adapters. It's large though, so it can block other outlet.
If you are just going to one country you're better off buying a couple of the single plug adapters, but they are usually sold in a set.
I haven't used a transformer in years as the hotels I stay at tend to have them in the room and the eletronics I carry is pretty much rated for 120/240.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 9 Apr 2011 10:53:38 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

So where will that girl be then?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 9 Apr 2011 06:36:11 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Yes, they sometimes sell plug adapters at dollar stores, for a dollar. If not, at luggage shops for much more, or the luggage department of depeartment stores, or by mail I'm sure. Around here there is one specialty shops that deal a lot with imported food etc and also have these adapters. Plus at hardware stores in foreign countries. They don't sell the reverse at hardware stores in the US because we don't give a darn if foreigners can use their appliances or not.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As I mentioned earlier, Target has everything you'd need. As does Radio Shack, Best Buy etc.
They are actually very easy to find.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/10/2011 8:48 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Methinks he meant to use euro-spec appliances in US. Haven't seen those in stores on this side of the pond.
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.