OT Safety Deposit Box (at a bank)

Page 1 of 5  
Does anyone in the group have a safety deposit box at a local bank? Or had one in the past?
I checked at a local bank here (Upstate N.Y.) if it matters. The one thing I don't like about it, is you don't get any kind of receipt for what you put in it. Also, the bank says only the person who has the box has a key to it. The only way the bank could get into it is if the rental fee is not kept current.
So, good or bad idea to get one? Any opinions and or comments will be greatly appreciated.
Thank you.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You don't get a receipt because no one but you knows what is in there. You open it, add or remove stuff in a private cubicle.
They require two keys to open. The bank keeps one and you get 2 copies of the other. The three keys are different. Lose one of yours and you have to pay a rekey fee. Lose both and it gets quite pricey as the lock has to be drilled and rekeyed.
Great place to keep small, irreplaceable items, stock certificates or the like. Keeping cash in one is not legal if I recall correctly. Old coins or the like is not the cash I mean.
Colbyt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/1/2011 8:19 PM, Colbyt wrote:

Why wouldn't it be legal? Sure, they have made keeping cash on hand as much of a PITA as they possibly can, what with the reporting requirements on any transaction above 'X' dollars, and if the law becomes aware of it, they will assume it is tainted money and try to seize it, and the burden of proof will be on you to try to prove otherwise, and the IRS will try the old 'imputed income' game and try to snatch part of it, even if you already paid all the taxes, and even at today's microscopic interest rates, you are giving up free money by not investing it, but AFAIK it isn't actually illegal.
I'm a simple man with simple tastes. If I were to win the lotto or something, I'd be seriously tempted to take the lump sum and cash it out, stick it in a wall safe, and just live of that and vanish out of the system. Never pay income taxes again. I'd keep a paper trail, of course, because I know they come after people who live like that, but it might be worth paying a lawyer just to grind their noses in it.
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What he said. I know I'll hit it one day, I just hope I won't be so old I'm strapped to a chair with terrycloth bath robe belts, throwing my Pablum on the wall.
If a guy just stuck it in a "vault", and could keep his mouth shut, he could outlive the money. A lot of people think of investing, but I think it would be enough to outlive myself, unless, of course I got stupid, which I don't think is going to happen.
Living off the grid and "disappearing" is something I have a little experience at. It doesn't require a Mensa mentality. First thing to do is get a disposable cell phone.
I'd take a used truck over a new one, and I'd be paranoid driving a Ferrari around a bunch of uninsured Mexicans. I shop at the factory outlets, and found that a $300 shirt is as scratchy as a $15 one, and lasts about the same.
I've had good stuff in my life. I could budget out of the wall safe and not feel bad about not making any interest. Do what I want when I want, get up when I want.
As for my heirs .......... they could have the rest. I worked for mine, they may get a leg up from what's left over, or just do what I did.
SteveB
Heart surgery pending? Read up and prepare. Download the book $10 http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you win the lotto, the first thing you need is a safety deposit box. The original ticket goes in the box. NOBODY sees the original ticket except you. Don't tell your wife, your cousin, your best friend, your bartender, your cell-mate, or even your dog. DON'T SHOW THE ORIGINAL TICKET TO ANYBODY until you have everything you want (see below).
You make copies, front and back (after you've signed the back of the ticket). These copies will serve for the remainder of the process. (You can put anything else you want in the box, but we're just talking about a winning lotto ticket), and you put the original in the safety deposit box. Cost: $100 per year. Shit. You're a millionaire. You can afford it.
Then you see a lawyer, a financial advisor, a tax accountant, and no one else. No wife. No bartender. Not even your dog. (You can surprise them later, circumstances warranting.)
You can't "vanish out of the system." The best you can hope for is relative anonymity. Tax agencies in the United States, the state you live in, and perhaps your county, town, or other local government entity, will be notified as soon as you step forward to claim your winnings. They'll be taking some of that ticket as soon as you produce the original to lotto officials.
You CAN, however, keep your name out of the general press (your lawyer will help with this). And this is a good thing. Most lotto winners are so happy about their windfall that they blab to everybody they know about it in very loud, happy terms. As soon as your name is published in the general press, con-men, grifters, long lost "relatives," "deserving" non-profits, capital investment specialists, J. G. Wentworth, and the Pope himself will come crawling out of the woodwork to "share" your good fortune with the world (meaning, mostly, themselves).
Your life will never be the same. And the changes won't be all light and roses. The reality of handling millions of dollars of personal money will overwhelm you like a cancer. You will curse the day you bought the ticket.
Ask me how I know.
Frank
--
Here's some of my work:
http://www.sharpbywarner.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/8/2011 10:25 PM, Frank J Warner wrote:

Yes, I've read all the horror stories. That is why the thought of the cash settlement (minus Ceasar's share, of course), converted to stacks of used 50 and 100 dollar bills, and hidden away, is so appealing. With no interest income or investment income or whatever, there is no further tax obligation in most states. Move to a small town somewhere, buy a shack in the boonies, and don't give anyone the new address or phone number.
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 08 Mar 2011 19:25:49 -0800, Frank J Warner

You forgot "move to Florida" or some other no income tax state. Establish residency, then cash your ticket. You usually have 180 days, plenty of time to sell your house, buy a house, title your vehicles, register to vote etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's also a good place to keep data backup media, if one is smart enough not to believe the Ultimate Stupid Computer Concept: "I don't really keep anything important on my computer." That's until the thing breaks and then it's "OMG all my family photos were on that thing."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Glovebox: Hot. Cold. Stupid.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Famous last words. Remember, too, that breaking into cars is as easy as opening a refrigerator, but just slightly more noisy.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/3/2011 12:05 PM, JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

storage spec? Typically the storage spec is much more liberal.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

True, but are you saying this means it's smart to take chances with what might be valuable data, by storing it in a place where (depending on climate) the temperature ranges from 0 to 100 degrees Fahrenheit?
Be careful with your next response. This is a trap.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 3 Mar 2011 12:05:19 -0500, "JoeSpareBedroom"

price. It would accept data, but forget it within a few minutes. Once I made it from the second floor to the basement with a few files, but usually it wouldn't be there when I got there.
It was a no-name brand, but still.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Actually, it's not better than nothing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The problem with online backups is you don't always have access to the internet. In fact, my connection went down for about 5 hours yesterday. Rare, but it happens. If I needed to recover a file I would be out of luck until the connection resumes.
Also, if you have a complete drive failure and need to rebuild, you wouldn't be able to access the net to restore your backup. With a local image backup on an external drive I can restore quickly and easily.

Even if you don't keep personal records, music, video, photos, etc., you still have many personal settings, bookmarks, and whatnot that are a major hassle to reconfigure when things go wrong.

CDR's (and DVDR's) are notoriously unreliable for long term storage. I have had so many disks fail on me after relatively short storage (less than a year) that I gave up on them years ago. I only use CD/DVD's for quick storage such as mailing a disk to others.
A USB flash drive will give you more storage, in less space, and is reusable. But, the long term storage is uncertain also.
I personally use two external 1TB USB hard drives to make full image backups of my hard drive at least once a week. I keep one in my desk for quickly recovering from simple accidents, then swap it once a month or so with the second drive I keep in my safe deposit box at the bank.
Anthony Watson Mountain Software www.mountain-software.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

FWIW I clone the entire computer to a HD (so I can boot from the other HD if needed) and use off-line for specific stuff like my photos, my business files, etc. I also have a zip drive for specific biz files (I am a writer so I tend to save articles to the zip file when I am done writing on them for that session). That way I have the clone if everything goes all fershugina, the zip drive for minor melt downs on current projects, and the off-site in case of fire, flood, earthquake or pestilence. I am a belt and suspenders kind of guy (grin).
--
"Even I realized that money was to politicians what the ecalyptus tree is to
koala bears: food, water, shelter and something to crap on."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<stuff snipped>

Since Google shows only 13 hits for "fershugina" and at least four of them are yours, I have to conclude that it's not a real word. I've been searching through the Yiddish dictionary for a while now with no hits:
http://www.yiddishdictionaryonline.com /
Perhaps you're thinking of
meshugener meh?shoog'?en?er / meh?shig'?en?er (m.) madman, crazy person, lunatic
There's another list ( http://thomer.com/yiddish /) that gives us:
Farshlugginer: Refers to a mixed-up or shaken item. Generally indicates something of little or dubious value.
That sounds a little closer to the mark.
Of course, that second list says:
Mashugga: Crazy
while the first list decries that Yiddish has no double letters (apparently not true in multiple dimensions).
Actually, your spelling is Italish or Yidian, a combination of Yiddish and Italian found mostly in neighborhoods like Boro Park and Bay Ridge in Brooklyn where Jews and Italians lived side-by-side for decades.
Even the Urban Dictionary didn't have anything for "fershugina" - this was as close as it got:
http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term rshizzle
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

day. They had various kinda-sorta-but-not-quite Yiddish words that they would use. IIRC (and I can't find my copy of Ridiculously Expensive Mad right off to confirm) I first saw it in a Wallace Wood take-off called BatBoy and Rubin. I probably fractured even their spelling over the years. I liked the sound and thought it went well with what was trying to be communicated (grin).

--
"Even I realized that money was to politicians what the ecalyptus tree is to
koala bears: food, water, shelter and something to crap on."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

After I pressed send I realized that I had seen something like it before in Mad. I think it's one of many Yiddish words that got "repurposed" for use in the magazine.
furshlugginer An aracane adjective used as an expletive in the earliest issues of Mad magazine (e.g. 1950's) - comparable to "garshdarned" (see examples). However, maybe it's true that it was also used to mean 'asshat' later on, as claimed above.) Possibly a parody of some German or Yiddish word, I suspect. Correct spelling may actually be 'furshluggenner'. 1) What the hell IS that furshlugginer thing?!? 2) Get that furshlugginer thing out of here! 3) Why would anyone waste their time on a furshlugginer thing like that?!?
Potrezebie was another such word.
Mystery solved!
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

What software and hardware would you recommend for cloneing (cloning?) the computer hard drive? I use Windows XP on a desktop. I do back up files occasionally on a USB external hard drive, but have never made a bootable clone.
Thanks,
Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.