OT: police refuse to do their job

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" snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com" wrote in message

You already pay them.
Police don't investigate such trivial matters, unless it involves one of their own.
I had an experience some 15 years ago, that set me off on their procedures. While driving at night, I seen a person in an oncoming vehicle, sitting up on the passenger door (window was down of course). The person had a shiny object in their hand, this was later (about 15 seconds later) to be determined to be a bottle. The person whipped the bottle at my car, it bounced off my hood & busted my windshield in two places. I turned around and chased the vehicle to get close enough to get make/model and plate number (I wouldn't do that now days, guess I was a little crazier years ago) .. I made a police report, and the officer pretty much told me, not a darn thing would be done about it. He asked if I wanted to file charges, I said yes. The prosecutor called me in a couple days, told me they couldn't haul a vehicle into court. He said if they investigated it, the owner would probably say they left the keys in the vehicle, and it was taken without their knowledge. I said "if I was in law enforcement, would this be looked into?" The prosecutor told me, they would get someone on it. I asked if the vehicle was used in a robbery, would they look into it. Prosecutor told me yes. I asked why won't they do anything since I'm a taxpayer, and he said "it's too trivial".
There you have it. Just forget about it, no use losing sleep over it.
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snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com wrote:

Laws on "citizen's arrest" vary by jurisdiction. In my state, the law actually reads:
"A peace officer or any other citizen may arrest without warrant for an offense committed in his presence if the offense is a felony or breach of the peace, or to prevent the consequence of theft."
In other words, for a felony, there is no difference between the arrest powers of a peace officer or a private citizen. Likewise for misdemeanors that disturb the peace. Likewise for shoplifting. Only a peace officer, however, may arrest for other misdemeanors (traffic, parading without a permit, small-time vandalism, etc.).
We also have the following law:
"A person is justified in using deadly force against another to protect land or tangible, movable property: (2) when and to the degree he reasonably believes the deadly force is immediately necessary: (A) to prevent the other's imminent commission of arson, burglary, robbery, aggravated robbery, theft during the nighttime, or criminal mischief during the nighttime..."
In other words, if you're up to no good after dark, you're dead.
Try Google for: (your state)+arrest+citizen or some such. Or ask the next cop you see.
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scribbled this interesting note:

You live in Texas?
-- John Willis snipped-for-privacy@airmail.net (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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Agreed. I've been through the house break-in experience myself. In one case, in an apartment, it was obvious the door had been kicked in. If I had had the time and resources I could have identified the make of boot from the tread marks on the door. The *detective* who showed up proceeded to go through a long explanation of how the "actors" broke in using a jimmy. Sheesh! I do, however, respectfully disagree with you about what cops do - the cops everywhere I've lived are only interested in ticketing speeders and setting up drunk-driver stops for what should be illegal searches. Cheers!
--
Luke
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Cheers, Bud!
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And what, exactly, would you have done if you knew the make of the boot? Unlike the TV crime shows, the chances are that you'll find out that there were several hundred thousand of those boots made of that size. Does that help you catch the thief? Nope.
Seriously, for a residential break-in or minor theft, it doesn't make sense to use forensics. It's a poor use of police resources.
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I think you need to call CSI. You have been watching too much TV. Police can do some amazing things, but they cannot work miracles. And they have to stay within the laws. Many evidentiary findings can be explained by a smart lawyer. Fingerprints on your car can be explained. What if I just touch your car at the mall one day when I lean over to pick up a quarter?
The real world doesn't work like you think it does. Educate yourself so that you can protect yourself. Attend open houses at your local police departments that deal with crime prevention. They will identify areas you are weak in, and give you good information on how to protect your property. For example, an engraver to mark your tools would cost you about fifteen bucks. Don't want to spend fifteen bucks and a couple of hours marking your stuff? Oh, well ............
If people really dislike the police so much, why is it that the first call they make when they have a problem is the police?
I never understood that.
Police don't refuse to do their job. They just refuse to do stupid things people ask them to do that are not within the law. Steve, who has several POs in his family and circle of friends, and who has been a coroner's investigator.
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SteveB wrote:

If someone's fingerprints were inside my car on the metal they braced against while ripping out the back seat there would be no explaining it. If someone with a breakin record left a fingerprint on the outside of the car they might still have some of the stolen goods or someone else's stolen goods. They might even break into another car tonight if someone in plain cloths took the time to watch.

It is not MY FAULT that someone broke into my car and ripped out my back seat to steal tools. I do not have good feelings about attend an open house where someone tells me to use the club but I decided to go anyway in case I was mistaken. I called up the dispatcher who was not aware of anything. The dispatcher transferred me to headquarters where they confirmed that there was not such an open house.
What I would like to go to: Is there a place I can go to learn (without devoting my life to it) crime scene investigation for property crime? Maybe there is a good technical book to read? Perhaps there is a portion of the police training that I should sit in on? A course at the community college, etc, etc?

It takes less time to remove the engraving from a tool than it does to put it on. Thieves either remove the engraving themselves or sell the tools and the new owner grinds it off in a matter of seconds per tool. Engraving tools has not worked to prevent their theft for me in the past.

They pay for the police. They expect them to do their job.

Taking fingerprints? Taking a police report w/o proof of insurance?

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

Here's the problem - it isn't very easy to take a fingerprint and match it against any and all fingerprints that might or might not be in police records somewhere. Fingerprints work very well when you have some idea of who the criminal is, and you need to get some proof. They don't work very well at finding the criminal in the first place.

No, it's not. But it isn't the fault of the police either. You can either bitch and whine that the police aren't doing anything, or you can get over it, make your insurance claim, and do what you can to minimize the chances of the problem happening again. For example, you could mark your tools with your driver's license number (this reduces the street value of the tools and makes it more likely you'll recover them if they are stolen). You could get a truck and keep the tools in a secure lockbox in the truck's box. And so on...

No such thing exists. Forensics is a very complicated thing, and it isn't something you can learn from a "dummies" book. Get over it and move on with your life.

Forensics isn't typically taught to police until _after_ they're hired. Unless you're a cop, you're not going to get that kind of training. Even if you had such training, what would you do with it? As I said before, if you don't have a suspect, fingerprints, DNA, hair samples, and all the forensics in the world aren't likely to help you. Especially for a routine theft.

Of course, this reduces the value of the tool.

This is also a lot of work for the thief, who may not want to bother with it - they can always steal somebody else's tools that aren't engraved.

Engraving isn't done to prevent theft - it's done to increase recovery afterward. A side benefit of engraving valuables is that it can reduce the street value of the items.
The bottom line is that if your tools are engraved and you have the serial numbers recorded, the chances of recovering them are much greater than if you don't. If the tools are totally unmarked and you don't know the serial numbers, the chance that you'll ever get them back is basically zero.

You seem to misunderstand what the job of the police really is.

As I've said, this is a stupid waste of time for a minor theft.

Likely this is due to the local legal requirements. Did you ask them why they needed it?
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So, this has happened to you in the past? How many times?
What did you learn from those experiences, Grasshoppa?
STeve
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Never thought of that. You mean no one has ever lost a tool from a locked box on a truck? That sure is good news, now I can get rid of that safe for valuable papers and jewelry. I'll keep it in the truck box.
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C'mon Ed. You know thieves are opportunists. The amateurs will snatch and grab from an open car. The industrious amateurs will use a prybar to open the truck toolbox. The pro will just take the whole truck.
Steve
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

No, but there's been several who've lost the box and all... :)
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It's a lot more secure than a trunk in most cars (which can be popped open by breaking a window and flipping a switch in many cars). A locked box in the back of a truck is also fairly hard to break into inconspicuously.
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Not my car. Just open the unlocked door and push the trunk release button. I don't believe in locking cars. What is the difference between and unlocked car and a locked car? The locked car get damaged when the thieves look for things to steal.
I've had my cars broken into twice. Total loss was a quart of oil stolen from where it was in the back seat of one of them. Other cars on the street had broken glass, deep scratches, slit convertible top, etc. They had insurance issues, I was out maybe 99
One of the TV shows like 60 Minutes had a locked and alarmed car parked on the street. They had a couple of different car thieve drive off with it in plain view of traffic and pedestrians. They were as fast and you and I with a key. If the pros, want it, they will get it. If the druggies wants it, he will do lots of damage along the way.
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wrote in message

OTOH,my Integra had the ECU stolen from it,and I was without my car for six WEEKS,while another ECU was built in Japan. I now have an auto alarm.
These days,many cars are targets for having the wheels/tires stolen from them,even with wheel locks,and now even headlamp assemblies are being stolen.(HID lights) A local dealer had the entire engine/transaxle stolen from an Integra on their lot fronting a major,BUSY highway. Having your dash ripped out to get the stereo out from it is no fun,either.

Most auto burglaries are NOT "pros",and an alarm is very useful in deterring them.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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wrote in message

The point being it's better protection than what he had.
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Have you considered a career in law enforcement?
Steve
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SteveB wrote:

Greetings,
The only career I would consider with significantly lower pay is retirement. I shouldn't have to choose a career in law enforcement. I should be protected by the existing police force. I would be willing to take some time to learn more about doing a little of my own detective work surrounding my own runins with criminals as a public service.
William

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Explain how this would be different as .......... let's say ........... a little side job and hobby as a brain surgeon ....................
I mean, it's about the same thing. Letting a nonprofessional get in there and do the same thing a professional does .........
Steve
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