OT: New interesting car battery problem (part two)

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So, after helping my buddy find a new battery at a good price and getting it put in, here's what happened.
Recap. He has a 2010 Honda CRV, 225K highway miles on it. Only problem is it was throwing a cat converter not at proper efficiency code for the last couple years, while driving around town. On the highway, it clears and the check engine light goes out. So, he was worried about getting it through inspection, which is due. He had used my code reader to clear the code, the drove it around so that all the emission monitors were set, except the fuel evaporation system one, which takes longest to set. NJ will pass a late model car with one not set. So, I told him to either wait a day or so until that one sets, or just take it in now. He was worried about failing inspection, getting a red sticker, etc. I told him that worst case, he can just get a new cat converter.
So, what did he do instead? Day after putting the new battery in, he went to Honda to get the airbags replaced under recall. While there, he bought a new Honda FIT, whatever that is. This is the dealer that he's bought 4 cars from, he goes through them fast. What do you think they gave him for a 2010 CRV that other than the above, had nothing wrong with it other than needing a good interior cleaning? No body damage, no rust, dings, perfect exterior, tires OK. They gave him $1500 for trade-in. I can't believe it. I was helping him to keep the car, get it through inspection. I told him that even if it needs a new cat converter, they are ~$300 and maybe $500 installed.
Opinions?
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On 10/14/2016 12:50 PM, trader_4 wrote:

So typical and that's why I rarely bother to help my friends anymore unless I know for sure they are not a flake.
Guy says his printer is not working so I go over there and see he had 50 or more print jobs stuck in queue. I am not that familiar with Mac but after a while got things all sorted out and demonstrated to him that all was now OK.
It did not even register to him that it was fixed...next time I saw him he said he bought a new printer.
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In alt.home.repair, on Fri, 14 Oct 2016 12:56:58 -0500, philo

Close to 40 years ago, I was part-time repairing things for money. I advertised in the girl's dorm of the nearby college, so money wasn't the only anticipated benefit. One girl calls about her sewing machine. I go get it and she tells me how badly her 12" tv is working. She's in a steel frame building. I tell her she needs a better antenna and to get some wire and toss it out the window.
Well, I can't fix the sewing machine -- that's a whole other world -- so I return it and she's bought another 12" tv and she's telling me it's terrible. Just like the previous one. I repeat my advice. I don't expect anything for failing to fix the machine but she gives me the old tv, which worked fine at my apartment, where I was connected to a roof antenna. Or maybe it was just that my window had a better view of the WTC, where the antennas were.
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On 10/15/2016 09:29 PM, micky wrote: dow.

speaking of girls...
I was chatting with some friends & talking to a woman named Debbie when her friend Jim walked up to me and said , "You want to know how dumb Debbie is?"
"She called late at night and told me her stereo wasn't working and insisted I come over...so I had to drive across town only to find she did not even have her speakers plugged it. I was pissed and after I got it working had to drive clear back home again!"
I was quite puzzled because I knew not only does she have an extremely high IQ she is also quite technically inclined.
Before I said anything she leaned over to me and whispered, " I was trying to seduce that idiot."
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On 10/14/2016 1:50 PM, trader_4 wrote:

The new car smell was just too enticing I guess. The coast of a new cat is probably a couple of months payment on a new one. The trade in sounds about right for a 10 year old car with a sticker on a new one under $15k.
I'd not want to try and fit into a FIT though.
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For the size of them they are VERY roomy. I'm 6'2" and 230lb and fit in my friend's FIT with NO problems at all.
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On Friday, October 14, 2016 at 2:07:56 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

RE, value of trade-in, see my reply to Meanie. By Kelly BB, it was really worth $3700 - $5000, in good condition. Even if you take off $500 for a cat converter, it would be $3200 - $4500.
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That sounds like a pretty good trade-in to me. When I was shopping for a used car at dealers (years ago), I observed that the prices generally seemed to follow straight-line depreciation based on a useful life of 100k miles. Condition didn't make a lot of difference. That useful life denominator has probably gone up some from 100k since then, but I doubt that many cars with more than 200k are going to have much market value unless they're classics or antiques.
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On 10/14/2016 1:18 PM, Neill Massello wrote:

Nope. He got ripped off. Dealer trade in value is $3K-$5K, depending on condition and mileage. Could be even higher depending on location/local demand. Around here used car prices are ridiculously high, and trade-in values are high, too.
Moral of the story: negotiate the trade separate from the new car purchase. Take it to another dealer to trade if necessary.
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On Monday, October 17, 2016 at 9:52:23 AM UTC-4, Moe DeLoughan wrote:

IF it was my car I would have either:
A - Just get it through inspection again and keep it. If I couldn't then:
B - Replace the cat converter for ~$500 and keep it
C - Replace the cat converter, pay couple hundred to have it thoroughly detailed, inside shampooed, then sell it retail myself.
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OK. I'm just surprised that a passenger vehicle would retain that much value after 225k miles.
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On Mon, 17 Oct 2016 17:41:42 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Neill Massello) wrote:

You have to remenber it's "not your grand-dad's " car. 100,000 miles on todays cars is just barely broken in., and with a new car costing in the $20,000 range, what used to be a $500 used car is now a $5000 used car.
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On Monday, October 17, 2016 at 7:41:51 PM UTC-4, Neill Massello wrote:

I'm a bit surprised the prices are that high too, but I knew right away that $1500 for the car in question was extremely low. A lot depends on what you want to do with the car with 225K miles. If you need it for work, commute 100 miles a day, or otherwise expect to put a lot of mileage on it, it's probably not the right car. But if you want an SUV as a second car, are just going to use it around town, for trips to HD, etc, and maybe some ski trips, it could be a good deal.
Now whether I'd pay $5K retail for it, IDK. But for sure if I had it, all that it needed was *maybe* a new cat converter, I sure wouldn't have sold it for $1500.
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On Tuesday, October 18, 2016 at 4:35:50 PM UTC-4, trader_4 wrote:
Forgot to add that part of this is that we typically think of a car with $225K miles as an *old* car too. If you drove 15K miles a year, the car would be 15 years old, while this car is just 6 years old. Many issues with cars are not just mileage related, but age as well, rusting out for example. Which is another good thing with today's cars, they sure hold up to rust a lot better. If that car was 15 years old, showing it's age together with 225K miles, it would be worth a lot less.
Heck, with what they get for used parts at the junk yard, I'm sure you could part out that car and get a lot more than $1500.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net says...

The price may not reflect the whole story. Some dealers will cut a lot off the price if you do not have a trade in. If you have a trade in, they will 'give' a good price for the used car,but not knock off much off the list price.
They are not going to give much for an old car nomater how the numbers look.
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On Tuesday, October 18, 2016 at 5:36:25 PM UTC-4, Ralph Mowery wrote:

So, you're saying Kelly Blue Book doesn't know what they are talking about and their trade-in, retail, numbers that show the car being worth a lot more are wrong?
And it was not an "old" car. It was 6 years old, in great shape other than possibly needing a cat converter, which the dealer didn't even know about. It did have 225K miles, which is high, but that's different than a 20 year old car that's falling apart with 225K miles.
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On Tue, 18 Oct 2016 14:45:40 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

I never traded a car in, but my understanding is that you have to look at the bottom line in trade-in deals. For instance, what's the difference if your friend got $5k for his car but paid $3.5k more for the new car? That's aside from financing issues, which can also have some meaning.
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On Wed, 19 Oct 2016 00:34:30 -0500, Vic Smith

Todat dealer financing is so low it is only a small consideration - and the days of being able to juggle the prices as you envision are pretty well gone. In most cases you get the same price, trade or no trade - and the trade allowance is "real".
Even YEARS ago - like when my Dad bought the '68 Rebel and was going to trade in the '61 New Yorker.; They were offering a ridiculously low amount for the Chrysler, so Dad said "forget it - I'll keep the Chrysler" and bought the Rebel outright for the same "before-trade" price - then asked "who wants to buy a nice 61 New Yorker?" The dealer principal had just walked in and Dad threw him the keys. Instead of the 2 or 4 hundred they were going to allow him on a trade, he got $1000 cash. Dad said for years that was the easiest $600 or $800 he had ever made.
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On 10/14/2016 1:50 PM, trader_4 wrote:

I think your buddy is a fool.
The lowest trade in value of the lowest model CR-V is roughly $4500 with the mileage it has. He probably could have sold it private and received more. Money must not be that important to him if he bought on a whim.
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The real value of that CRV if it was in the condition you say is well north of $4500 - meaning a "fair trade-in" is better than $2500 minimum. Around here the dealer would allow 2500 to 2800 and pass it on to a local used car dealer who would sell it for around $5000
ANY honda around here has a pretty good resale value.
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