OT - Modern Nutrition - (changed from the slanderous Damn that JB subject line)

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On 10/11/2014 08:08 PM, rbowman wrote:

Oh my gosh!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saganaki~
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On 10/11/2014 09:15 PM, Todd wrote:

Hi Rbowman,
And how to pronounce it: http://www.greecefoods.com/restaurants/ordering.htm
Love Greek food. The angles taught the Russians to sing and the Greeks to cook!
-T
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Ever wonder how much obese oinkers raise your health insurance premiums?
http://www.thefiscaltimes.com/Articles/2014/06/19/Budget-Busting-US-Obesity-Costs-Climb-Past-300-Billion-Year
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I don't know why these studies always show a premature death as a cost when it is in fact a benefit. Less social security paid, less old age care required, etc. It is not like we have a labor shortage either.
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Spoken like a man!

You may not be a meat snob, but you are a man with very strong ideas about what's right and wrong about meat. A meatophile? (-:

That's my man Gordon. In between the humilations are some valuable cooking lessons. More fun (for me, anyway) than Julia Childs and the rest of them. I have been watching Sabores de Familia to brush up on my Spanish. Much easier to pay attention when it's attractive women in their thirties (what now constitutes cradle robbing for me) speaking a foreign language.
There's always something to be learned watching a pro do their thing, even if it's foul-mouthed Gordon Ramsay who uses the program to promote his numerous restaurants and find chefs to staff them. Sort of like "Survivor" but in the kitchen with knives. Also some great insight into human failings. The two main areas they explore are "hide your mistakes, if you can" and if you can't "blame someone else." If you've been in the military you'll recognize Gordon's following in the footstep of 10,000 drill instructors before him.

We all have. One of my first part-time jobs in college was as a dishwasher in an IHOP. After a week the boss casually mentioned that I should be turning on the HOT water before every run of their massive, car-wash type dish washer. A friend who worked as a waitress said that one day the owner came up to her and asked "Did anyone say anything about the lasagna (the special of the day)?" She said "No" and he replied "that's good because it smelled really funny when I took it out of the cooler." Yecch!

My wife just had that happen but didn't think it was the food because others ate the same thing. I assured her that restaurant food is like archeology. You can have good layers and bad layers. She obviously hit a bad one.

Steak tartare - you do live on the edge. I eat it and carpaccio, but always with a little voice in my head saying "you'll be sorry." Sometimes the voice is right. I spent a few years in Amherst when the steel mill exhaust made for some of the nicest sunsets I've ever seen. Got to see Niagra Falls frozen over one year, a sight that stays with you forever because for once, the Falls are ghostly quiet. Worked at a mob-owned pizza joint, too.

I used to cover embassy parties and they served it in huge bowls at the Chilean embassy. We're talking about a small herd of cattle that must have died for a party with nearly 1,000 guests. I didn't indulge that night because I was on deadline with a nasty editor who wouldn't even accept death as an excuse for turning in stuff late. His motto was "if you're going to come back from an assignment without any photos, don't bother coming back."

I've had surprisingly few grease fire but it one restaurant I worked in, they hadn't cleaned the grill vents in quite some time and passers-by said the flames rivaled a jet engine when the grease caught fire and was stoked by the huge exhaust fan whose thermal cut-off apparently had long ago died in a bath of vaporized grease. They paid more attention to maintenance after that. Fortunately the fan vented 10' high in an alleyway otherwise someone might have gotten toasted.

And I think I am getting excessive buying and cooking 4 lbs of chicken at a time. Does a 15' shoulder even fit in your Brinkman or do you have to rig an empty oil drum?

It would be nice to end the prolific use of antibiotics on farms and cattle ranches. I just read that most of the antibiotics used in America are used on animals destined for human consumption. It seems, at least according to some medical sages, that we're heading for a very dark place with antibiotic resistance diseases. No, wait, that's already happened with MRSA and antibiotic resistant TB. )-: Make that a very much *darker* place.

The times they are a changing. When the world switched from hunting and gathering to agragrian based living, Oprah and cable TV were not yet available. That meant people engaged in physical pursuits with their newly-found free time. It was also the rise of great armies because Pharoahs could feed them from tribute farmers paid in grain. In Europe, the farmers could only go and fight during the winter and the growing season. They basically refused to go to war when planting or harvesting needed to be done. If the battle ended badly, the food rotted in the fields but the dead soldiers weren't there to eat it so it was a wash for them, at least. The Romans gave away free bread (and circuses) because it kept the natives from getting restless and engaging in revolution. I can't help but think foodstamps and cable TV are the modern day equivalent.
--
Bobby G.



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Robert Green wrote:

It was good, and I had no side effects.
http://www.buffalospree.com/Buffalo-Spree/September-2012/WNYs-All-Time- Greatest-Restaurant-The-Cloister/ http://snipurl.com/29c79m6
Sadly, the Cloister is long gone. The article is probably right that it couldn't survive Nouvelle Cuisine and the demonization of big chunks of beef in various states of rawness.
There was another place on the outskirts of Buffalo but I'll never be able pill that name out of my failing memory. It was an Italian place and when you drove into the place it had every cliche in existence from the flamingos to the BVM in an upended bathtub. U couldn't figure out if it was a campy satire on Italian restaurants or if it was for real but the chow was great.

The best one I saw was when my sister-in-law tried to do a rotisserie turkey on a charcoal grill. Those turkeys burn like a candle in the wind. At least it was edible. Back when Reynolds Wrap first started promoting a tin foil tent over the turkey my aunt got her wires crossed and wrapped the whole bird up like an aluminum mummy. We'd eaten Christmas dinner and went over to her house to do the presents exchange. Between the kids and grandkids there must have been 20 people wandering around scavening anything they could find to eat while the turkey slowly boiled in its juices.
Fortunately my mother was a kitchen conservative. When they came out with those popup things she took it as a sign the turkey might be getting close to cooked but it would come out of the over when her turkey fu said it was done.

It fits, but it definitely need refueling midway. Unless I see a small one I just get the boneless ribs. They've got enough fat that they're tastier than the loins.

There is a big feed lot just off I5 near Coalinga CA. Even if there is heavy fog you know where it is. Bot a blade of grass and the cows climb up on 20' high mountains of manure to wistfully gaze around at the outside world. It's almost enough to make a person a vegetarian. You know they must have them loaded to the gills with antibiotics.

Closer to home, I've been fascinated by the artifacts left by the mound builder civilizations in the SE. They obviously had a lot of spare time to build huge mounds. There's one up in Ohio where they either were building massive fortifications or just liked moving dirt around. The archaeologists argue about it but the best guess is the whole thing went down the toilet around 1100 CE. The succeeding cultures jsut looked at the mounds and scratched their heads. Sometimes they would do intrusive burials because they thought the mounds had some heavy significance. The southwest show the same sudden exit. I talked to a Navajo ranger at Chaco Canyon and he said his family wasn't happy with him working there. They had no idea whi had lived there but figured some bad spirits might still be hanging around the ruins.

Works for a while, and then it all falls apart. Consider the state of the 'Cradle of Civilization' today. If there is any civilization along the Tigris or Euphrates I must have missed something.
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Todd wrote:

For sure, Sadly, there's only one Greek place in town and they dumb it down for the white bread palate.
There was a Greek place in Toronto that was basically cafeteria style. You walked through the kitchen and pointed to what you wanted. I went there one night with a guy I worked with and selected one of the lamb stew variants. George thought the safest thing to do when he didn't recognize anything was to follow my lead. We're sitting at the table and he's commenting on how good the stuff is, and, by the way, what is it? When I told him. his response was 'It can't be. I hate lamb!'. U told him he obviously never had dealt with someone who knew how to cook it.
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On 10/12/2014 08:02 PM, rbowman wrote:

Hi RBowman
In the 70's, my wife and I toured Grease. We basically ate our way through the countryside. Every chef had his own Moussaka. They were all extraordinary. And I hate lamb. Their's was incredible.
Have a customer that was married to a Scotsman. The national dish is lamb. She hates lamb. Made trips back to the motherland a bit of a trial for her. So I figured that she would have the best lamb recipe on the face of the earth so she could tolerate it. She told me she cooks it till it is gray, then smothers it in catsup's. EEEEEEEYYYYYUUUUKKKKK!!!!!
-T
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On 10/13/2014 2:34 AM, Todd wrote:

The musical?
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On 10/13/2014 06:22 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

You are a funny bunny!
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Todd wrote:

I'm not strict paleo, but when I first started Albertson's (the local supermarket) usually had the skinless breasts on sale and I figured it was good, clean protein and inexpensive to boot. I must have eaten a metric ton of them. Now I look at a plain white chicken breast and my throat sort of closes up. I've switched to boneless thighs. They've got fat and some taste to them.
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On 10/12/2014 08:07 PM, rbowman wrote:

Hi Rbowman, Technically, both my wife and I are "Primal" not Paleo. There is a lot of overlap. We are both big fans of Mark Sisson:
http://www.marksdailyapple.com/about-2/mark-sisson/
He has been a T2 Diabetic since he was a kid.
Beautiful description of your throat closing up. The only way around it is tons of butter.
Both my wife and I prefer thighs too. Have you tried them with Rosemary, Garlic, and Meyer Lemon? Don't forget the garlic!
-T
I am trying to grow garlic in my little garden. Harvested my first three a couple of months ago. OH HOLY MOLLY is it so much better than the store. Peppery, buttery, and so much garlic flavor.
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Todd wrote:

Good for the dog too. I had a neighbor who was pretty elderly and not too mobile. He had a fat beagle that he would take for a walk as well as he could manage. One day he was under the weather and I was going for a bike ride so I offered to take the dog for his daily spin. I figured I'd be trying to keep the bike upright at 2 mph but I'd take the pooch around the block until he got tired. Wrong again. As soon as the beagle figured out he wasn't pulling an anchor we were off to the races.
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Todd wrote:

Not that I know of but I haven't talked to her in a couple of years. Sort of a grammar problem conflating "was my wife" with "was diabetic." I only have/had one wife. She's had the Lord on speed dial for a while between juvenile diabetes, related vision problems, breast cancer, open heart surgery, and a few other things. After a while you get scared to make the phone call and find it's disconnected. You get on the wrong side of retirement age and that goes for a lot of people.
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So she is right - she hates lamb. And keeps reinforcing that belief. Sad.
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On 10/13/2014 06:30 AM, Pico Rico wrote:

Hi Pico,
I can't stand the smell of it cooking. But in Grease, oh boy! May have as much to do with the cooking as the raising.
One thing I have learned in cooking is that you can mess up good ingredients but you can not fix up bad ingredients.
The smell of burning broccoli and egg plant, something to behold! Oh course, I am only speculating. I have no personal experience with burned food. None at all I tell you! :-)
-T
Okay, maybe a little.
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Todd wrote:

I never forget the garlic. Garlic and onions are the staff of life. I'm not exactly sure why, but the supermarket had tumeric root and I picked some up and am using it like ginger root. It's interesting and not very much like tumeric powder.
I might have some rosemary tucked away but it's probably dead. I buy bulk spices from the local yuppie store in little plastic bags. Unfortunately I don't always know exactly what's in the bag and the tag with 1035 doesn't do much. If I'm on my game I write the name on the bag as well as the store code.
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<I was at the gas station last evening. I saw a 50-year-old guy struggle to get his big fat ass out of his car for a good 30 seconds so he could pump some gas. Was that you?>
So you spend your evenings hanging around gas stations looking at guy's fat asses? Sounds *awfully* suspicious. Do you wear the diapers you seem so obsessed with while you watch them pumping?
--
Bobby G.



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