OT Hints on replacing computer CMOS battery?

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I'd appreciate any hints on safely removing and replacing the CMOS battery on my old Compaq. Any suggestions? I hear some are VERY difficult to remove!
TIA
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On Thursday, July 9, 2015 at 8:30:57 AM UTC-5, KenK wrote:

http://support.hp.com/us-en/document/bph04375
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| I'd appreciate any hints on safely removing and replacing the CMOS battery | on my old Compaq. Any suggestions? I hear some are VERY difficult to | remove! |
It shouldn't be. Just pop it out. Then don't dally in replacing it with a new one. The role of the battery is to power BIOS memory when the computer is not plugged in. If it's left out for too long the settings can be lost. It's always a good idea, just to be safe, to boot into the BIOS first, if possible, and write down the current settings. I once got a call from my very elderly father to fix his PC. He'd been mucking around in the BIOS and apparently set everyting to factory default. But for whatever reason that wasn't good. The computer was rebooitng as soon as it booted. :) If you're not familiar with BIOS settings then it's a good idea to know what yours are in case you lose them.
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On Thu, 9 Jul 2015 10:57:39 -0400, "Mayayana"

Most people don't think about the CMOS battery until it dies and factory defaults may be the best way to get going again. I would be curious what setting you had to change from the default to get it to boot. Usually that is the bail out option to get it going when people are mucking about.
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| Most people don't think about the CMOS battery until it dies and | factory defaults may be the best way to get going again. I would be | curious what setting you had to change from the default to get it to | boot. Usually that is the bail out option to get it going when people | are mucking about.
Actually, I'd be curious, too. It surprised me that the defaults didn't work. And it was an OEM PC (Dell), not home made. But I don't remember the details now. I just puttered around looking for something that might be wrong and eventually got it working again.
On the other hand, maybe it's not so unusual. Dell may be getting mass deliveries of motherboards that need different customizations for different models or extras.
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On Thu, 9 Jul 2015 10:19:46 -0700 (PDT), Uncle Monster

Love them or hate them, you have to admit Dell is pretty user friendly if you have the install CDs. If you don't they are $10 or so. I have a strange one I am messing with as we speak, trying to up the RAM. It is a Dell but it is a vendor model, sold to integrators so their support is pretty shaky. All the service tag returns is "Pentium D610" and no information is available. The first time I worked on this one I was able to cross reference the system board to a real Dell model but I can't find the card I wrote it on. My fault for not scratching it in the case with a screwdriver. I was able to find a compatible memory stick in my stash so I am good to go ... until next time.
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On Thu, 9 Jul 2015 14:45:56 -0700 (PDT), Uncle Monster

Both of our PCs in the living room are on UPS along with the TV and all of the stuff hooked to it. Sometimes the power goes out and we don't even notice right away.
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On Thu, 9 Jul 2015 12:33:15 -0400, "Mayayana"

Well, that answers THAT question. Another "Dell from Hell".

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

PC, first it does some POST and if it passes then it is looking for boot device according to the CMOS settijngs. If the device is not there or unable to find boot record on it to boot OS then it stops and says something. I have an OLD Dell WS540 with dual Xeon cpu which keeps our book keeping. It has all SCSI and eSATA devices. It still has FDD as well. Never gives trouble.
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On 7/9/2015 7:16 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

Consulting client has supplied me with a Dell to access their remote desktop.
CMOS battery has been dead for a year.
Easy to work around but I thought I might try to replace it and found YouTube video on how to do it. Not that simple. Recall need to remove HD and fan to get at it. The Dell desktop is about 1/4 the size of my GW desktop where everything is more accessible.
Then found that I am locked out from opening the computer case and I would have to send it out of town for them to work on so I just let it be.
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wrote:

On Self Test) High end Dell's are decent computers, but their consumer grade stuff is mediocre at best - kinda like a Compaq.
If you are restoring them from the Del specific install image and you haven't modified them, they restore OK - but installing from a retail Microsoft disc can be an experience. One good thing about DELL is if you get through to their support line and give them the number on the case (can't forget what they call it) they can tell you exactly what came on the computer - down to the serial number on the RAM chips (usually - but I've had one that didn't even resemble what they said it was - and it was all Dell labelled parts!!!) The same can be said for Acer and most other tier two systems.
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On Thursday, July 9, 2015 at 11:30:25 AM UTC-5, Mayayana wrote:

How can this be...considering the computer guru that you are? Was this before the IT expertise?
Mine are all Dell, new and used...but I have one Asus lapper...
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bob_villa wrote:

on the brand it is easy to work on. My choice is MSI and Lenove when it was IBM owned. Most daily chores we just use iPADs. Wife at least knows how to use iPAD. Grand son taught her how to use iPAD. He is only in grade 1.
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wrote:

owned and made by Lenovo for a while after Lenovo bought the personal computer division of IBM. Within about a year of the purchace the IBM name dissappeared and the Lenovo brand became established.
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| > Actually, I'd be curious, too. It surprised me | > that the defaults didn't work. And it was an | > OEM PC (Dell), not home made. But I don't | > remember the details now. | | How can this be...considering the computer guru that you are? Was this before the IT expertise? | :) I seem to learn a new bit every day. Yesterday I was trying to update DownloadHelper for Firefox. It turned out I had to update Firefox itself. Now I have to figure out how to get back my beloved Cape Neddick lighthouse "throbber". (Apparently the Mozilla people decided that page-load indicators are no longer fashionable.) And it turns out the new DownloadHelper is poorly designed, anyway. I'm also finding weird odds and ends. Geo.enabled in about:config. What the?!! It turns out a function to tell websites my location is enabled by default! Should I go back to the older, less annoying FF 24 that I had? Whatever happens, it will have been at least 2 or 3 hours wasted to deal with all of these unnecessary changes to already overproduced software.
Computers and OSs are so complex. On top of that, the tech industry depends on constant, often frivolous obsolescence and manufactured abstruseness. It never ends. (I read yesterday that Microsoft's phone business is dangerously close to dying... which could threaten their idea for Metro apps sold through their own store to compete with Apple... which could be ruinous for the few developers who were sucker enough to put all of their eggs in the Metro basket: A few years of re-education in a new technology that may end up entirely useless before it gets going. So now they'll need to retrain yet again to become expert in the language du jour, which may or may not be around next year. And actually, it's not even as bad as it looks because there was never any money in phone apps to begin with. Apps are the goldrush. Google, Apple and Microsoft have figured out how to cut their risks by selling shovels cheap and taking a 30% cut of any gold found.)
The Dell belonged to my elderly father. He called Dell and apparently got suckerpunched by the salesman. A 90 year old man who does email ended up with an expensive and powerful, dual-CPU computer. Something like 6,600 GHz. He's since stopped having his own computer, but at the time he was a daring explorer. I don't know how he got into the BIOS, but he didn't hesitate to fiddle around in there.
Personally I'm ambivalent about Dell. I have a couple that were given to me. They seem OK, and the support for drivers is good. But I would never buy one myself. The drivers are all custom packaged. One has to get them from Dell. And the hardware is often customized. The first time I ran into a Dell was in salvaging from a Win95 box that had an unusually good graphics card, which I decided to save. But when I opened it up, it turned out there wasn't a card. There was a sort of stick, with a square plug that went into a motherboard socket I'd never seen before. It was useless for reuse in any normal Windows computer. Emachines was the same way. The hardware was custom. The power supplies were too weak, but they were so small there was no way to fit a normal one in the case. Things like that can result in unexpected costs. But with eMachines at least the product was dirt cheap.
So it wouldn't seem *really* odd to me that an OEM box doesn't have default BIOS settings. But with Dell nothing surprises me. They built their business by catering to business needs, being very responsive with support to people who were happy to pay through the nose and almost certainly would never open the case. Hardware lock-in is a good strategy for Dell. And once the IT dept learns the Dell way of doing things they have no reason to complain.
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On Thu, 9 Jul 2015 10:57:39 -0400, "Mayayana"

lost or compromized.
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On Thursday, July 9, 2015 at 5:59:57 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I don't think so. Motherboards switched to using Flash memory to hold those setting a long time ago. It's part of the flash bios. AFAIK, the only thing that needs the battery now is the clock.
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On Thursday, July 9, 2015 at 6:44:23 PM UTC-5, trader_4 wrote:

CMOS is static RAM that works with the flash BIOS...it requires battery backup.
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On Thu, 9 Jul 2015 17:24:06 -0700 (PDT), bob_villa

the bios information off the SDRAM.
Remember the AT class computers that used the real-time clock chip with the built-in battery (Harris Semiconductors)? Some had provision for an external aff-board battery, but a large number were built with no provision to add a battery - thankfully MOST of the chips were socketted - but the clock chips were soon very difficult to source and worth as much as the PC when replacement became necessary. When the clock battery died, so did the CMOS
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No sign of the OP...but we can sure BS on this stuff...
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