OT: Headphone jack gets only mono

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On Friday, June 13, 2014 4:19:37 AM UTC-7, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I've reported OVER & OVER & OVER that I HAVE tried headphones in my other audio devices; have also tried plugs, adapters; switched everything around. Nada.
I wouldn't be asking for help if I hadn't tried as much I could first!. Of course when a thread gets long, some info gets left behind.
HB

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Higgs Boson posted for all of us...
And I know how to SNIP

Now, now Higgy. You are dealing with Stumped here so ya go real slow and he won't catch on anyway. Cool your jets, he ain't worth it.
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Tekkie

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On 6/13/2014 10:00 PM, Tekkie® wrote:

Worth noting, is that Stumped usually deletes any post over 100 lines of text. So, when HB does the double lines and sends 300 lines of text, SM usually just deletes the post as having no value. If HB would trim text, then SM might read HB's posts.
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Christopher A. Young
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Most meters will click headphones, also dynamic microphones. Its not likely a 9 volt meter is without series resistance, but just use X10 scale.
I once blew out an expensive photodiode with a Tripplet on X1 scale.
Greg
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workaround in the first place.
If you take the the output currently going from the TV to the stereo and instead pipe it to the base station of wireless headphones, it should sound as good as the HK unit. It all depends on whether your friend hooked up the TV's with RCA audio output to the HK's input.

stereo to headphones; headphones themselves, umpty times. Have also plugged various headphones into other audio equipt. where they work fine. All points to JACK.
Does that include the adapter? I've had those units fail on me, too and that would be the cheapest solution - obtaining a new size-changing adapter. Have you established that the connector passes a stereo signal using other equipment? Do you have a unit that had a 1/4" stereo output jack to test the adapter/headphone combination exactly the way that you use it on the HK? What devices are you using to test the headphones? I want to make sure you're not checking the headphones without the adapter connected.

headphones into jack; headphone plug is too small. Have also switched these around; no change.
It sounds like you are using mini-plug headphones (matchstick diameter) in a stereo that uses standard 1/4" phone plugs. Those big connectors aren't used much anymore except on larger stereos.

cleaner? Or Bob F's suggestion of sandpaper?
I would try a Q-tip dipped in rubbing alcohol (90+% if you have it) and squeezed damp to see if any material comes off on the swab. Sandpaper I am a little less sanguine about. I seriously doubt it's corrosion - it sounds much more like physical damage.
I would focus on the adapter because it sounds like it sticks out of the HK jack and absorbs the brunt of any tugging on the line even before the HK jack does. The fact that it failed gradually seems to point to one of the jacks - either the stereo or the adapter jack. I would also look at the adapter first because the fix would be a lot easier. (-:
--
Bobby G.



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On Wed, 11 Jun 2014 21:50:24 -0700 (PDT), Higgs Boson

Not yet. See my second post, and maybe my first one.

What about all your friends at the collider.

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wrote:

I love WD-40. I even think it's a lubricant. But I woudlnt' use it for this.
I agree though. Liquid before sandpaper. Has sandpaper ever worked?

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I have used sandpaper. Various grades and devices, burnishing tools, on relay contacts.
I have sat and cleaned silver plated contacts on large rotary switches with tarnX with q tip. They started out all black. Cleans well. Wasn't even my decision.
I had a lot of problems with sand getting into electronics in the desert. Very fine stuff.
Greg
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On Thu, 12 Jun 2014 09:42:30 -0700 (PDT), Higgs Boson

IIUC, to get the good sound you used to have, you were already using the the same jacks that you'll be using with the wireless headphones he's suggested.
The problem with the tv's sound is almost surely the speakers themselves and not the electronics or the jacks.
One can take a 2" by 3" by 1" transistor radio from the 1960's and plug in a better speaker and it will sound pretty good. Do you remember the cardboard tubular speakers. 12" wide by 2" in diameter. Sounded good.
Right now in my bathroom I have a 14" color tv with a two speakers from one 1930's record player. One's bigger than the other. I've been using them in two diferent bathrooms for hte last 40 years. They sound great, but the speaker in the tv by itself sounds like Donald Duck. .
Small speakers never sound very good. And thin speakers, shallow ones afaik never sound good either, but maybe the ones that come with thin screen tv's are a litltle better. I didnt' even consider using the speakers built into my thin screen monitor.
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I actually had one of those 60's ? I didn't think much of it.
Greg
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wrote:

Relay contacts, sure. They experience arcing, and deposits, and even maybe microscopic transfer of metal from one point to the next one.
They get much harder use than any part of a plug and jack, except maybe if one is in the desert. .

Tarnx sounds good. I'll remember that.

I'll bet.

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wrote:

I was asking about a 9 volt battery alone, no meter.
I often use a 1.5 volt battery alone to hear the click, and i know 1.5 volts won't burn out anything in my house (since I'm not some high tech nano-lab)
But since he's using bigger speakers, not earbuds, I don't think a 9-v battery Alone, no series resistor, will hurt it. Just a louder click. Still I live alone and like 9volt because there are thing on it to attach the alligator clips and wires. He must have someone to hold them to a 1.5 volt battery AA, or AAA, and then he be sure there is no damage from that .

Enough reason for caution.

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On Thu, 12 Jun 2014 20:43:25 -0700 (PDT), Higgs Boson
First I should say that we're not going in a very organized manner, I think, and that's probably due to the nature of Usenet, where everyone answers at once, but that should merely slow things down. It also probably increases the chance of success.

Surely if you hear a click in one ear but not in the other, either you're doing something wrong or there is something wrong with the headphones.
Related to my introduction at the top: I thought you had tested the earphones on some other device and both sides worked.
When I read your first post, I thought maybe you had just rearranged things without a) fiinding other headphones or b) finding another device to plug in the headphones you wanted to use, but now I'm pretty sure you did a, but not so sure you did b. You may have other devices with a headphone jack. After years of ignoring the jack it's easy to forget its there. Or your friends do.

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On Friday, June 13, 2014 9:20:33 AM UTC-7, micky wrote:


As I just answered another friend above, I HAVE TESTED VARIOUS HEADPHONES WITH VARIOUS OTHER AUDIO DEVICES; ALSO TESTED PLUGS AND ADAPTERS. WAS VERY THOROUGH. SWITCHED EVERYTHING AROUND. BOTTOM LINE: EVERYTHING WORKED EXCEPT JACK IN STEREO. Which is why I reached out for advice.
HB
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One of the reasons it's hard to follow is your demented quoting style, where you quote large amounts of text for no apparent reason, inserting useless blank lines, which become triple blank lines when you re-quote your own quotes. You also use vague and incorrect terminology, and don't understand what you read very well.

Shouting doesn't add a thing.
"WAS VERY THOROUGH SWITCHED EVERYTHING AROUND" is vague and inconclusive shouting. You never described switching "everything". Many things could be switched that you haven't mentioned. It's a near certainty that you haven't tried every combination, since you show no evidence of even knowing what combinations exist.
"EVERYTHING WORKED EXCEPT JACK IN STEREO" What might that mean, specifically, in plain English?
Good luck. In this conversation, some of the info you've been given is excellent, and you've ignored plenty of it. Some of the info you've been given is incorrect and useless. But the biggest stumbling block is you, your incoherent posts, your misunderstanding of the terminology, you misreading of many of the suggestions, and your inability to step through the troubleshooting in a logical manner, which you're now trying to blame on Usenet. Some people are trying to help you, and now you're getting testy at them because you can't understand what you read, or what you write. Give up and buy a TV that isn't total crap.
It's been fun watching the village idiot's dog chasing its tail.
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gregz posted for all of us...
And I know how to SNIP

NO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Tekkie

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gregz posted for all of us...
And I know how to SNIP

Not the sand! :-)

--
Tekkie

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It sounds like you've established it's a bad stereo jack on the HK unit. The question is what to do now? Repair is one option - and we're only assuming that the jack is bad. Any part of the circuit in the HK that delivers audio to that jack could be broken so, theoretically you can replace the jack and still have no stereo output. Repairing a problem like that could be fairly extensive/expensive, even to get an estimate.
If it were me, I'd bypass that jack and the HK. That leaves a wireless headphone or separate amplifier box option. If you want to be able to still hear TV through the speakers of the HK, you'll need two splitter cables as well. Choice of gear dependent on how existing gear is routed. Cost should be around $25. Basically a dedicated low-power amplifier for headphones that is being "dropped into" the audio system where the HK and its most likely bad jack now live. It's what I would do, or go wireless.
I solved the ubiquitous low volume problem of my existing 32" LCD TV by just attaching some normal-sized bookshelf speakers. Fortunately this unit's built-in speakers were wired with normal speaker wire spring clip connections. The larger box recovers the bass that's always missing from the slim built in speaker.
BTW, does the HK have a built-in tuner? Same results as TV with headphones? I know we're being repetitive, but I've fixed things that weren't broken (at least in the place I thought they were) before so it pays to be exhaustive.
FWIW, cleaning, reaming or sanding the jack's innards are not likely to help if this is mechanical damage. Most contacts have an ultrathin chrome-like plating that once mechanically degraded, will rapidly corrode. Remember, though, if you opt to fix it, the repair may not simply involve a jack transplant.
--
Bobby G.



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No. I blamed the lack of an organized manner of proceeding on Usenet.

He does seem testy, when I tthought I made a good point. And even if I didn't, I was trying to. If it indeed is the jack, there were several posts about cleaning with a spray, about bending tangs -- these are good ideas. (Except that I think it will be hard to bend the tangs right, especially since there will be 6 (no common tang) and only one needs to be bent. It's probably the farthest of 3 from the center and should be bent closer to the center, but if too close to the center, the headphones will stay on even when the speakers are on. However that can be solved by unplugging the headphones so maybe being the tangs will actually work. If you choose the wrong group of 3, that won't be so bad either. You can then switch to the other set of 3, but like I said you should push with a wooden stick while wearing the headphones, in order to identify the right tang) When the missing sound appears, that's the right tang.
And there is always the last resort: Replacing the jack, but it's likely stuffed in a small corner of the device, and since the sound goes off when the plug is inserted, that means there are 7 wires going to the jack, each of which has to be put back on the right solder tab of the new jack. And even though all 1/4" stereo ** jacks work the same, they aren't all built the same and the solder connections can be in different places from other jacks. Right??
**(What is the nomenclature that means double throw? Insert that between stereo and jacks above, or just make sure to buy a 7 solder-connection jack. I've never seen "double throw" in the description or name of a jack, and yet they come in what's reasonably called both single and double throw. Double if they turn some output off when they turn the headphones on. )
So it would take 5 sets of notes. See below^^^^
One A, a table that just says which wire (described by color, and by destination if two wires are the same color) goes to which solder connection (described by a drawing or more than one drawing if they're not all on the same side.) .
Then B, also a table, by examining the old jack, what each solder connection, described by where it is, (first row, 2nd from left, for example: Actually, it's better to make a drawing or more than one drawing if connections aren't all on the same side) and what it is for. Left in, L normally on, L normally off, same 3 for Right, and common. That's 7. (Normally on goes eventually to the RCA jacks. Normally off goes to the headphones)
Then C, by examinging the new jack, the same as in the previous paragraph for B.
Then a table that matches every solder connector in B to the one in C that is for the same purpose.
Then a table that matches every wire as described in A to a solder connector in C. (by using the table just above and the information in A, (and if necessary, B?) )
(Somehow I thought there would be another step or two, and a D, but I think I got everything.
All of this has to be written down or assuredly, one will get confused. One will get confused anyhow and have to look at what has been written down. If you don't write every step down, A, B, C and the two last tables, you will not finish, or you will finish by guessing.
I'm sure I've confused the OP by now, so unless he can find the exact same jack,,, well even then he needs to do steps A and B, And there's a good chance the jacks will look the same until one is done with step A or step B, and then one notices that they're not the same. Step C should be done, even if one thinks the two jacks are the same.
Remember, if one doesn't finish connecting all the wires, the device won't work anymore, not even the RCA output jacks.
I don't know how much someone would charge to do this, and I'm afraid the faceplate might not look like new when he's done. Because there is probably a nut that holds the jack in place is outside the chassis but under the faceplate.
^^^^Hmmm On the other hand, maybe it's held in place by solder connection pins that go into the printed circuit board. Would they do that with something subject to such lateral forces as a 1/4" jack????? Then one has to get a jack with the the pins in the right place. None of that A, B, C, D stuff will help. Are they any more standardized when one buys a jack like this with circuit board pins? Then one also has to consider how long the pins are and whether the jack will line up with the hole in the faceplate. Are they always as long as one needs? If they don't know here, ask in sci.electronics.repair.
Altoghether, the above is several more reasons that, as cheap as I am, I like the idea of the wireless headphones whose transmitter plugs into the RCA jacks.

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On Friday, June 13, 2014 6:54:46 PM UTC-7, micky wrote:



You're right, and I apoolgize to the Universe. People ARE trying to help m e. What I see happening is that someone just joins the thread, not having read all the back posts, and I have to repeat the basic info I posted in the fi rst place.

Now that is unfair. Maybe it's the term "switching" that bothers you?
What I did was methodically try ALL my headphones, ALL my plugs, and ALL my adapters in the jack. "Switching around" = Headphone A with plug B, ada pter C. Then rotate all such that each component has had a chance to work with each other. There's a mathematical term for this procedure but I can't think of it. Basically, eliminating all the variables.

Sigh. After "switching around" all 3 sets of all 3 headphones, plugs and a dapters, it became clear that THEY are not at fault, since they did work in other audio items. What is left? The stereo jack. I really didn't think that was so hard to understand, so I hope it's clear now.
HB



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