OT - emergency blankets

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Has anyone tried the mylar foil blankets? Or, the yellow ones with a bit of fuzzy fabric, like the ambulance guys use?
Does either do any good, after car wreck, or gone off the road and waiting for rescue?
With winter here, I'm thinking to improve my car supplies kit.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On Nov 24, 12:25 pm, "Stormin Mormon"

Supposedly the mylar reflects the heat from the person inside the blanket and helps to keep them warm. Thank God I have never had to use the two I have in my auto emergency box in the trunk.
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Might want to unfold and refold them. The mylar tends to break at the folds. You might have a couple packages of mylar ribbons by now.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote in message news:17c5b11b-5cfc-4a54-98ba-
Supposedly the mylar reflects the heat from the person inside the blanket and helps to keep them warm. Thank God I have never had to use the two I have in my auto emergency box in the trunk.
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Now, that is great wisdom.
And some heavy wire to make candle hangers.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
When I lived in cold country of the Adirondack Mountains it was said to keep candles in your car if you break down. They will help keep the chill off...passerby's will notice and save the day.
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I like the old "Space Blankets" if they still make them under that name. I have seen new ones with hand pockets sewn on the corners to help hold it on as a poncho. They are made out of rip stop material, with foil on one side. Around a campfire, you can wrap one around yourself, holding the corners outward with your hands, and feel the campfire cooking you. You will need to back up a ways until you reach the comfort zone. I have used them for under tent liners, sleeping bag liners, under sleeping bags, over sleeping bags, lots of places. They are now in the $15 range, and sure work great.
Steve
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I've done that with a camp fire. One night I remember, at the father son campout. I didn't want to go to the ice cold tent, and freeze in my sleeping bag. But, I knew I needed the sleep.
I did freeze badly that night. I've never enjoyed that part of being out.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I like the old "Space Blankets" if they still make them under that name. I have seen new ones with hand pockets sewn on the corners to help hold it on as a poncho. They are made out of rip stop material, with foil on one side. Around a campfire, you can wrap one around yourself, holding the corners outward with your hands, and feel the campfire cooking you. You will need to back up a ways until you reach the comfort zone. I have used them for under tent liners, sleeping bag liners, under sleeping bags, over sleeping bags, lots of places. They are now in the $15 range, and sure work great.
Steve
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Was it also said to keep matches or a fire stick in the car...and to check them regularly to make sure they will light the candles when needed?
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Of course not...... no one thinks to check the preps. Until the moment of need, and then they don't work.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote in message

Was it also said to keep matches or a fire stick in the car...and to check them regularly to make sure they will light the candles when needed?
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On Sun, 25 Nov 2012 07:52:30 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

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That's what I meant by "fire stick".
http://compare.ebay.com/like/250750730646
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Dollar tree has those. Excellent, I love em.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

That's what I meant by "fire stick".
http://compare.ebay.com/like/250750730646
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-snip-

In real life do they work when it is really cold-- like when you *need* them? I haven't carried a Bic lighter in decades- but I remember that when hunting I had to keep them in a shirt pocket because if they got down to about freezing they didn't work for crap.
Jim
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Boiling point of butane, I remember that being about 30F. So, if the lighter is cold, won't work.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butane
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
In real life do they work when it is really cold-- like when you *need* them? I haven't carried a Bic lighter in decades- but I remember that when hunting I had to keep them in a shirt pocket because if they got down to about freezing they didn't work for crap.
Jim
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wrote:

choice) for half a minute or so and it will light. Forget the bic - too hard to light with cold fingers with all the "safety features" built in.
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I like butane lighters. When I carry my Model A in my pocket, it gives me backaches.
Doing refrigeration repair, I light a torch now and again. Also heat shrink tubing. Candles at home. Plenty of reasons for a nonsmoker to carry a butane lighter.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
That never came up. You can dip a match head in wet wax to keep it dry until needed. Remove the wax and strike it.
I won't go into how to light a cigarette with a Model A Ford.
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When the lighters were fuled by the liquid fuel I can see that you would want to have matches . Now the butane lighters have been out for 40 + years, I would think matches for emergencies would almost be on the out. Unless you were where it was very cold and the butane lighters would not work. I do not smoke, but keep several butane lighters around. Have to light birthday candles and the wood stove and a few other things.
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I keep matches on hand, just in case. Butane lighters are totally convenient, but sometimes the fuel leaks out. I've needed a lighter, but found mine empty. At least once or twice.
"Self lighting" piezo propane torches are also excellent. As with the long nose "Aim N Flame" lighters.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
When the lighters were fuled by the liquid fuel I can see that you would want to have matches . Now the butane lighters have been out for 40 + years, I would think matches for emergencies would almost be on the out. Unless you were where it was very cold and the butane lighters would not work. I do not smoke, but keep several butane lighters around. Have to light birthday candles and the wood stove and a few other things.
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Yes, those piezo propane lighters are the thing. I have one. Saves a lot of wasting of the propane also. I only fire it off a few seconds before I use it and then it shuts off a few seconds after I am finished heating with it. Almost no fuel used except to heat with. With the older types that you have to light with a match or stricker, it was usually light it, use it for a short period of time and leave it on while waiting to use it again a short time later.
Also good for a fire hazzard. Seldom was the self lighter set down while on, the the 'manual' type was often just set down while on. If it fell over while lit, it could cause a fire.
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I'd forgotten how I used to set down the old style torches, still lit. Cause it was such a pain to relight it.
Piezo propane torches are excellent for lighting pilots on water heaters. Warms up the thermo- couple, at the same time.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Yes, those piezo propane lighters are the thing. I have one. Saves a lot of wasting of the propane also. I only fire it off a few seconds before I use it and then it shuts off a few seconds after I am finished heating with it. Almost no fuel used except to heat with. With the older types that you have to light with a match or stricker, it was usually light it, use it for a short period of time and leave it on while waiting to use it again a short time later.
Also good for a fire hazzard. Seldom was the self lighter set down while on, the the 'manual' type was often just set down while on. If it fell over while lit, it could cause a fire.
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Oren You will get a better result if you dip the matches in clear nail polish. That leaves a very thin water proof coating that does not have to be removed to strike the match. -- Tom Horne
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