OT: Apple says screw you law enforcement!

Page 3 of 7  
On Monday, February 22, 2016 at 10:52:23 PM UTC-5, Micky wrote:

ould

ed

d to

e in

dged

a.

uld

as

ne was

but

but

Phone?

Google broken?
http://netsecurity.about.com/od/iphoneipodtouchapps/a/How-To-Strengthen-You r-Iphones-Passcode.htm
"If you use the simple 4-digit numeric password, there are only 10,000 poss ible combinations. That may seem high, but a determined hacker or thief wil l probably guess it in a few hours. Turning on the iOS complex passcode opt ion increases the possible combinations enormously. iOS allows for up to 37 characters (instead of the 4 character limit in simple passcode option) wi th 77 possible alphanumeric/symbol characters (versus 10 for simple passcod e).
The total number of possible combos for the complex passcode option is mind bogglingly huge (77 to the 37th power) and could take a hacker several lif etimes to figure out (if you used all 37 digits). Even adding a few more ch aracters (6-8) is a huge roadblock to overcome for a hacker trying to guess all the possible combinations."
Now what specifically is on that one actual phone, IDK and as far as I know, the FBI has not said. If you have a reference that shows otherwise, I'm sure we'd all be happy to see it.

Because as I explained to you previously whether you have a 4 *digit* passcode or a 6 place *alphanumeric* passcode makes a huge difference in the number of possible combinations. Per the above, they say that it can actually be even far worse than that. But then you say there is no difference between using a 4 digit one and a six digit alphanumeric one. Maybe the FBI should send the phone to you.

an

n

WTF? The issue and what the FBI is trying to do isn't to enter *one* ten digit code. If they enter one code and it doesnt' unlock, then they enter the next, and the next.... They aren't asking for Apple to give them electronic means to hit it with passcodes because they only want to try one code. Sure, they likely have a list of some codes they want to try *first*, that they gleamed from other PWDs the terrorists used. But they could do that by hand. Clearly what they want electronic means for is to be able to do is hit the phone with *every* possible passcode, if the likely ones don't work and to keep going until the find the one right one.

Of course it matters. As I and others have explained to you whether you have to go through 10,000 possible tries or trillions of tries is the essence of what it's all about.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 23 Feb 2016 06:41:04 -0800 (PST), trader_4

It doesn't matter what is actually the case. We were talking about what the news story said. At least I thought we were. I certainly never offered the news story as proof of what the number was.

Here they are talking about a hacker entering the code by hand. The FBI plans to use a computer to enter the codes. That's why it will only take a couple days longer for 10 digits than for 4.

It says it all right, but it doesn't explain it. How do they enter alpha if the keypad has only 10 buttons?

I said there was *little* difference, not "no" difference. How could you not notice that?

And I've never accepted that there could be alpha characters entered. You're confusing what you have been saying with what I have.

Then your math is wrong. You have one day or one hour times 6.8 million. It's you, 6 lines up, who start with one code.

I'm sure they have their own electronic means to open locked phones, that they were using before the "ten-times and you're stuck" feature was added.

Now you're bring up trilliions. Before the claim was only billiions, and my statement about time is based on that But "none of this matters", because in the 4 lines above that answer, you're talking about encryption, prime numbers, algorithms, mathemeticians. None of that matters, only the number of codes that need to be entered, and you don't need encryption, prime numbers, algorithms or mathemeticians to increase the length of the code from 4 numbers to 10 numbers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, February 23, 2016 at 2:04:29 PM UTC-5, Micky wrote:
At least I thought we were. I certainly

You sure did.

Your-Iphones-Passcode.htm

ossible combinations. That may seem high, but a determined hacker or thief will probably guess it in a few hours.

Do the math and then get back to us on that. Note that it's 10 digits to begin with, because anyone that wants to go to 10 digits is going to go to 10 alphanumeric characters. Good grief. But even 10 digits versus 4, you have a million time more codes.

ations enormously. iOS allows for up to 37 characters (instead of the 4 cha racter limit in simple passcode option) with 77 possible alphanumeric/symbo l characters (versus 10 for simple passcode).

Are you daft? Never seen a cellphone screen where you can enter all the characters of the alphabet? WTF good is Apple's world class security if you have such limited choices? And 10 buttons? The iphone doesn't use buttons to enter the code.
I gave you the freaking link that goes through all the security options.

ind bogglingly huge (77 to the 37th power) and could take a hacker several lifetimes to figure out (if you used all 37 digits). Even adding a few more characters (6-8) is a huge roadblock to overcome for a hacker trying to gu ess all the possible combinations."

say

Because it's not a "little difference". I've politely explained to you many times now, how modern encryption is in the public domain and it depends entirely on that "difference". That's because it's not a little, difference, it's a HUGE difference. It's a difference between seconds and decades or more. Another poster here further tried to explain that to you, citing the sun going out, or similar time frame.

I see, because you won't accept that alphanumeric are possible it just can't be. Village idiot.

mean

tion


it

Village idiot, again. Where is your math?

No shit Sherlock. What does that have to do with this?

Again back to the just 4 numbers. Even a village idiot by now should realize that Apple's world class encryption, can't depend on just 4 digits. And whether it's billions or trillions depends on what the perp actually chose on that particular phone.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 02/23/2016 12:04 PM, Micky wrote:

Don't quit your day job.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

the actual cryptographic key is a 256-bit AES key. You would see the heat death of the universe before you were able to try all the possibilities.
1.1579209e+77
(that's a one followed by 77 zeros). A lot more than "billions".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 22 Feb 2016 18:56:45 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

Irrelevant. The phone owner doesn't enter 256 bits or 32 bytes or 32 characters to unlock it. He enters however many characters the unlock key is and come to think about it, I'm sure it's not alpha, only numerica because that what shows on his keypad. I don't have an ipad but I bet it's no more than 6 numbers.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, February 22, 2016 at 10:55:27 PM UTC-5, Micky wrote:

but

ut

hone?

http://netsecurity.about.com/od/iphoneipodtouchapps/a/How-To-Strengthen-You r-Iphones-Passcode.htm
"Turning on the iOS complex passcode option increases the possible combinat ions enormously. iOS allows for up to 37 characters (instead of the 4 chara cter limit in simple passcode option) with 77 possible alphanumeric/symbol characters (versus 10 for simple passcode).
The total number of possible combos for the complex passcode option is mind bogglingly huge (77 to the 37th power) and could take a hacker several lif etimes to figure out (if you used all 37 digits). "
Maybe you want to rethink that bet? What good would this world class encryption that Apple is so proud of, that even NSA would take decades to crack, be if it's all undone with a trivial 4 digit passcode?

Bingo.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

THe world class encryption protects the data in the phone and while it is being transmitted over the air where it can be easily intercepted.
If you HAVE the phone, yes all you need is the passcode to get the phone to decrypt the data and that is what the govt is pretending to need help with, getting the passcode.
No one is trying to decrypt the data directly.
That's why I think this is a sham on the part of the govt to use public opinion to pressure the high tech community.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, February 23, 2016 at 10:43:08 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Then what good is the world class encryption that is, as you say, protecting the data on the phone? If all you need is a simple pwd and all the data on the phone is then open, the data on the phone really isn't protected anymore than that provided by the simple pwd.
It obviously isn't that simple. A link I provided talks about the variety of password options available on iphones, up to 37 characters. What exactly is set on the actual phone in question, IDK and as I said in another post, AFAIK the govt has not said. My guess would be that it's probably at least 6 digits, but IDK. I say that because the govt has asked for a way to electronically enter tries. If it's just 4 digits, you could crack that by hand in a day, once the 10 strikes thing is bypassed.

Agree. But there would be no point in super encrypting it, which all agree can be done, if it's all undone by a 4 digit passcode.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 23 Feb 2016 07:43:00 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Bingo. You're a lot more clear than I've been.
I was really only thinking of my half of the equation. When I ask how do you enter alpha to unlock the phone, well you don't. Alpha characters can be part of the key, which the user creates, but the key is already in the phone, or every time the user wanted to use the phone, he'd have to reenter the key. When they unlock the phone, the key will be there and like you say, the phone itself will decrypt the data.

But isn't it just as much of a sham for Apple to make the public think the FBI is trying to get it to crack encryption?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, February 23, 2016 at 2:12:51 PM UTC-5, Micky wrote:

And we still don't know how long that passcode is and whether it's only digits or alphanumeric. You alone here, are the only one that thinks that doesn't matter.

You don't know how you can enter alphanumeric on a cell phone? Really?
Alpha

Alphanumeric can also be part of a long string the user creates to UNLOCK the phone, as the reference I provided shows. Are you so daft that you don't realize that it would be totally useless to provide world class encryption, but then have that encryption unlocked by a 4 digit code?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, February 23, 2016 at 2:36:20 PM UTC-5, trader_4 wrote:

s

es

is being transmitted over the air where it can be easily intercepted.

ne to decrypt the data and that is what the govt is pretending to need help with, getting the passcode.

OK let me try one more time THe encryption uses a gigantic KEY that makes it practically impossible to guess. This protects the data WHILE IT IS TRANSMITTED IN THE AIR. THis gigantic KEY is not the same as the PASSWORD that the user enters on t he keypad. If you have the phone and have th password, the phone knows the gigantic KEY and will decrypt the data for you.
In this case the govt HAS THE PHONE and it is much easier to break in via the password then try to guess the key, (which you agree) and that is what the govt is asking Apple to help.
And yes you keep pointing out that it is MUCH EASIER to crack the password than the key which is why i think the govt doesn't really need help to crac k the password. They are using this case for political purposes.
What the govt really wants is a back door into the KEYS so they can grab da ta in the air in other cases EVEN WHEN THEY DON'T __HAVE__ THE PHONE. This is what they have been arguing about for months previous to this case. If you don't have the phone, the password is of no use, you need to crack the KEY. So they are using public opinion in this case to turn the tide again st the high tech community which refuses to weaken the KEYS. Its shrewd po litics on the part of the govt. They are no dummies when it comes to politi cs.
To the average joe, its bad Apple won't help the govt catch terrorists and the distinction between keys and passwords is lost.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/23/2016 1:38 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

This may also be used to protect the data *in* the phone's memory!

Ever buy a house and have the realtor walk up to a "lockbox" attached to the front door? He/she opens the lockbox (combination, etc.) and then fetches the house key from inside the lock box. House key's "security" is decoupled from the lock box's "security".
Of course, if someone cuts the lock box open, then they've defeated the security OF THE LOCK BOX -- but the key's security remains intact! (e.g., could be a Medeco cylinder on the house but a 3 digit combination on the lock box).
In Apple's case, the lock box SELF DESTRUCTS after some small number of attempts to guess the combination. So, imagine trying to guess the combination to the lock box (easier than picking the lock on the front door of the house!) and, after some small number of attempts, the box bursts into flames (thermite) and MELTS THE KEY that it has tucked away inside.
So, you've enhanced the apparent security of that 3 digit combination.

Just like breaking into your PC -- *if* you give me physical access to it and about 5 minutes! BECAUSE THE PC WON'T SELF-DESTRUCT if I guess wrong! :>

No. The government needs someone to "disable the self-destruct" mechanism. They want to be able to guess endlessly without risking losing the DATA that is held (encrypted by that BIG key!) in the phone.
Returning to my realtor analogy, they want to be able to sit at the front door trying every 3 digit combination without fear of the lock box self destructing and taking the key with it!

I don't think so -- not in this latest filing. I'd be willing to bet the spooks can crack AES256 with all the zetaflops they have at their disposal! But, if the phone erases the data, then they are SOL.
It SHOULD be possible for them to access the memory directly without requiring the phone (passcode) to "cooperate" -- cuz that cooperation comes with the risk of self destruct. But, that means microprobing the chips, reverse engineering the circuitry, etc.
If Apple suddenly disappeared from the face of the Earth and our survival was at stake, they *would* be able to do it. But, they don't want to have to expend that much effort for the hundreds/thousands of times they will want to do this ("once" is a baldfaced lie)

Again, I don't think this is the case based on their filing. They may be hoping to exploit the ignorance of the public to equating one issue with the other ("Well, you let us do THAT so you should be willing to let us do THIS, as well!")

The real problem here is the gummit is obviously in a perpetual game of "catchup". They seem to not be forward thinking enough to anticipate the workarounds that will undoubtedly arise -- OUTSIDE of the control of Apple, etc.! (i.e., how are you going to compel the TERRORIST to crack his proprietary encryption scheme for you?)
The gummit has been reactive in all of these cases (at least those that have come to light). You don't see them checking liquids until they HEAR that liquids might be used. They don't check shoes until they see someone trying to use a shoe. etc. With this sort of approach, it's only a matter of time for something to slip through the cracks: "Why didn't you guys *think* of this possibility and check for it -- with all the money and privacy that's been sacrificed to enable you to 'keep us safe'..."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, February 23, 2016 at 3:38:51 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

ass

ades

it is being transmitted over the air where it can be easily intercepted.

hone to decrypt the data and that is what the govt is pretending to need he lp with, getting the passcode.

y

e

o guess. This protects the data WHILE IT IS TRANSMITTED IN THE AIR.
No, it also protects the data that's on your phone. That is one of the main purposes, that if the phone falls into the wrong hands, that they can't just read out the data. And the reference that I provided describes the passcode options and how it can be up to 37 characters long.
http://netsecurity.about.com/od/iphoneipodtouchapps/a/How-To-Strengthen-You r-Iphones-Passcode.htm

the keypad. If you have the phone and have th password, the phone knows t he gigantic KEY and will decrypt the data for you.
Then the gigantic key would be useless, because anyone who gets the phone can defeat the world class security with a simple passcode. That's why the passcode options are not limited to just 4 or 6 DIGITS.

a the password then try to guess the key, (which you agree) and that is wh at the govt is asking Apple to help.

What you're suggesting is like having the world's most secure safe and the only option is to have the combination for the safe inside a simple metal box that sits in front of the safe and is secured with a $2 lock. That's why the passcode can be 37 characters long and it's up to the user to decide how strong they want it to be.

d than the key which is why i think the govt doesn't really need help to cr ack the password. They are using this case for political purposes.

data in the air in other cases EVEN WHEN THEY DON'T __HAVE__ THE PHONE.
The court order isn't for any of that.
This is what they have been arguing about for months previous to this case. If you don't have the phone, the password is of no use, you need to crac k the KEY. So they are using public opinion in this case to turn the tide against the high tech community which refuses to weaken the KEYS. Its shre wd politics on the part of the govt. They are no dummies when it comes to p olitics.

nd the distinction between keys and passwords is lost.
Which of course is the right position. The govt has a perfectly legitimate court order and Apple instead is protecting terrorists.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

your analogy is correct only for the case where you have physcial access to the phone.
The purpose of the world class encryption with the gigantic key is to prote ct the data while it is TRANSMITTED ON THE NET. In this case almost anyone can intercept it and you need world class encryption to protect it.
You seem to miss the distinction between physically having the phone and me alrly intercepting the data on the net.
In this case the Govt has the phone so it is much easier to get the data du e to the lock box analogy you gave.
The govts ultimate goal is to move public opinion to force the high tech co mmunity to weaken encryption so the govt can decrypt data that has been in tercepted on the net without havig the physical phone.
Yes I know, they are not asking for that in this particular case, it is a f ew moves ahead in the chess game.
Bottom line, I think the govt can get into this particular phone that they physically have without Apples help, but they want to use this case to furt her their ultimate goal of weakening encryption so they can decrypt interce pted data when they don'y physically have the phone.... M
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

y physically have without Apples help, but they want to use this case to fu rther their ultimate goal of weakening encryption so they can decrypt inter cepted data when they don'y physically have the phone....

and I wil add, if the govt gets everything they want, opening this phone and weakened encr yption, it will probaly do no good in the long run.
There are unbreakable codes that are simple.
ONE TIME PAD used in WW2.
A few years ago they found a dead carrier pigeon in a chimmney with an encr ypted note attached. The note is encypted with a simple one time pad.
NO ONE has been able to decrypt it even with modern computers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, February 24, 2016 at 9:31:12 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrot e:

to the phone.

tect the data while it is TRANSMITTED ON THE NET. In this case almost anyo ne can intercept it and you need world class encryption to protect it.

Where is your reference that it's only to protect the data while it's being sent? And to whom and by whom? If I use an iPhone to buy something online, AFAIK, the transaction is not protected anymore or any less than it is on any other phone, PC, etc. All use RSA based security and it's an agreed on standard, not an Apple specific one.

mealrly intercepting the data on the net.
You seem to miss that Apple doesn't set the standard for encrypting data on the net. Their encryption when sending my credit card number to Ebay conforms to the same standard that everyone else is using, AFAIK. If I send a Word document to you, it's not encrypted at all, unless I take some special steps. If I use SnapChat to chat with you, from what I understand, that is encrypted, but not by Apple, but by whatever SC uses.
What Apple has made super encrypted is all the data on the phone which protects that data from being read out of flash by someone who gets a hold of the phone. It also protects it when it's backed up to the cloud at Apple. And that encryption apparently relies on whatever passcode you choose, which is why it can be up to 37 alphanumeric characters long.

due to the lock box analogy you gave.

community to weaken encryption so the govt can decrypt data that has been intercepted on the net without havig the physical phone.

few moves ahead in the chess game.

y physically have without Apples help, but they want to use this case to fu rther their ultimate goal of weakening encryption so they can decrypt inter cepted data when they don'y physically have the phone....

I agree that they likely could get into it, with a lot more work and time on their part though, than if Apple helps them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, February 23, 2016 at 2:12:51 PM UTC-5, Micky wrote:

Now you're contradicting yourself. If you have to enter the key each time you use the phone, then it's not just a 4 digit or 6 digit code that unlocks the phone. That is what I've been telling you for 10 times now, complete with references.

Well, the FBI is cracking the encryption. When you put the passcode in, it decrypts the data. And the FBI intends to try passcodes they think may work and if that doesn't work, then brute force it by hitting it electronically with all possible passcodes. And as explained previously, whether that passcode is just 4 digits or a longer one that includes the alphabet makes a very big difference.
It would be really comical and pointless for Apple's world class encryption to be limited by offering only a 4 digit code, after which it all decrypts. It would be like having the worlds best safe, but hanging in front of it is a simple box with a cheap padlock and inside the box is the combination to the safe.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 23 Feb 2016 06:45:58 -0800 (PST), trader_4

No. First off, they say alpha but don't explain how to enter alpha with a numerica keypad.
Second, , no one, no one in the whole darn world, especially a self-starting terrorist is going to use 37 numbers. He used 4, maybe 6 numbers. The FBI can start with 1 digit codes and work their way up. They'll find it before they get to 10 billion.

It's up to the user to decide how long the code should be. I don't lock my phone at all, or my computers. Even when I spent 2 months in a dormitory with my computer on a shelf in the closet but still available to 20 other guys, I didn't lock it. Check the average length of the lock codes users use. I suspect it's less than 4, but I'll bet that it's between 4 and 5 characters.
Someone posted:

It says the object of the search is "communications and data". When it says that, what is it referring to?
Doesn't the cell phone company have any texts sent or received? And doesn't the email provider have any email sent or received? And aren't oral phone calls lost forever, unless someone recorded them and no one records phone calls on a cellphone?
So what does communicatons mean?
Does data refer to the phone directory? Mine has no names because they are too long. I just use 2 or 3 letters, and a h,w, or c suffix for home, work, or cell. Someone who knows me or who went through my home computer could probably figure out who the abbreviated names refer to (though it would be easier to just see who owns the phone numbers that went with them, unless they are disposeable phones, but then I would encode my home computer names too**.
And the phone numbers are all valid. Of course ,my closest co-conspirators I've actually talked to on the cell phone, so the cell phone company has those numbers already, but maybe they want the ones he's never called.
If not, what else does data refer to? I have my niece's bachelor's thesis, but only so I could read it on the plane. I don't see people putting much terrorist data on their cell phones, in place of paper, unless they were email attachments, and doesn't the cell phone company have copies of all the attachments? or not?
What communications and data are they hoping to find?
**(By encode, I don't mean encrypt. I just mean whatever operational name my group of conspirators was using for each other. Or I'd make them up, like newbie, foodgirl, connecticut, which are the code names I use when discussing people with my friend, so as to keep them anonymous. (Connecticut doesn't live in Connecticut. That would be too obvious. But my friend probably thinks she does.)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, February 23, 2016 at 2:02:34 PM UTC-5, Micky wrote:

.

6, but

e

, but

iPhone?

e.

t

Your-Iphones-Passcode.htm

nations enormously. iOS allows for up to 37 characters (instead of the 4 ch aracter limit in simple passcode option) with 77 possible alphanumeric/symb ol characters (versus 10 for simple passcode).

ind bogglingly huge (77 to the 37th power) and could take a hacker several lifetimes to figure out (if you used all 37 digits). "

Who says the only keypad is a numeric one? Obviously smartphones are use to enter characters and numbers all the time. Clearly they know about the security options on the iPhone and it would be really dumb to have an option for an alphanumeric one and no way to enter it. Thinking about this some more, the keypad I saw on TV had a phone style keypad with 1 having ABC on it. You probably hit it once quick for 1, or hold it to get a pop-up that allows A, B, or C. My phone does similar on the keyboard.

And again, you know this exactly how? I asked you for a reference, AFAIK the FBI has never said how many places and whether it's only digits or alphanumeric. And you can't start with 1 digit, you have to start with a code that's the length requested.

No shit Sherlock. But the point is that we don't know what level of security the terrorist chose. Only you claim to know, but you have zippo to back it up.

Whatever is on the phone, obviously.

The phone carrier would presumably have the numbers that texts were sent to and received from, but IDK that they would have the actual text contents or for how far back.

Maybe, maybe not, depending on their retention policy and whether it's cloud based or client based.

It means what you listed above, plus other means. Wifi phone apps for voice calls over the internet for example. Or WhatsAp for the equivalent of encrypted text messaging, which is apparently popular with the terrorist s now. The WhatsAp could have terrorist contacts in it's directory. There is probably some data that the perps recently deleted that is still on the phone, depending on how data gets deleted, etc. Apple would know that too.

It could be all that's been listed so far, plus even documents, eg a guide on how to conduct attacks, make bombs, etc. It would have web browser history too. But until they get it unlocked, nobody knows. Even one name, one phone number that gives the FBI a lead could lead to another perp, another terrorist cell still active, etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.