OT: any good routers on the market?

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:
[snip]

Then what happens when nothing is connected to the WAN port? The ROUTER can't be used that way. What about the AP?
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Mark Lloyd
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Mark Lloyd wrote:

Hi, It becomes switch then
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wrote:

It becomes a wireless access point if it is able to be set up to be one
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On Wed, 02 Feb 2011 12:58:58 -0600, Mark Lloyd

Like I said - some routers can be used as an AP - nothing on the wan port. Some cannot. If set up as a router, not an AP, they will not function without the WAN connected. To use as an AP the router portion is dissabled in the setup.
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On 01/29/2011 09:03 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

yeah, I have a Netgear WNR3500. It did what I wanted, too. For about six months. Now it doesn't. It's a shitty tool.
nate
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Nate Nagel wrote:

Hi, That box is known for running too hot. Think power supply in the box is cooked or going. Heat is electronics enemy no. 1/
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aemeijers wrote:
[snip]

A router is a device that goes between 2 (or more) networks. These networks do have to have different IP ranges, or else the router wouldn't know when it should route data to the other side.
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On 1/27/2011 5:20 PM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

I see what I call battling routers all the time when I get a call to fix a network that a customer hooked up on their own and they can't understand the India based tech support people. :-)
TDD
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:
[snip]

Not that I know of.
And most router / switch boxes contain a third newtorking component, a wireless access point.
BTW, the connections between components can be switched electronically (at least in some routers). One of the devices (Linksys WRT54GS with Tomato firmware) I use here is set up with the WAN port and AP reversed, so the router uses a wireless WAN connection.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Try to recognize that even when they're in the same box, a SWITCH and a ROUTER are different things. The ROUTER part is used only with the internet connection, and is limited in speed by that.

True. This fact has nothing to do with a particular user benefiting from gigabit rather than 100Mbit.
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On Wed, 26 Jan 2011 20:20:17 -0600, Mark Lloyd

So what? He buys a router with a 4 or 8 port switch built in. They are all on the same circuit board and cannot readily be serviced separately, so for all intents and purposes they ARE the same.
Don't complicate things more than they have to be.

If you have gigabit cards on all your computers as well as on a network printer there is an apreciable difference in speed when dealing with large files. On the printer it won't get the paper out any faster, but there is less delay on the computer waiting for everything to spool out to the printer. It is particularly noticeable if you do any video streaming from one computer to another (media server)
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:
[snip]

They are logically seperate components. Thinking of them as one might be simpler, but interferes with understanding.

Don't simplify things more than they are.

Did you think I was disagreeing with you there? Why?
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Try to recognize that when you posted this:
"And even if you do (need gigabit internally), you need one or more gigabit SWITCHES. The router is involved only for internet communication. Most aren't fast enough for gigabit. "
That sure implies that a typical homeowner could buy a gigabit router that you can't connect 4 PCs to via gigabit ethernet. Or that they need to buy two things, a router and a switch. I don't know about you, but if you go down to Best Buy or similar, I don't think you'd find a gigabit router that doesn't contain the switching function, ie one that has only a single WAN port and a single LAN port.
Here's a typical example:
http://www.netgear.com/home/products/wirelessrouters/high-performance/WNDR3700.aspx
Netgear calls it a GIGABIT ROUTER. And nowhere do they even talk about a switch. It has a WAN port for the internet and 4 gigabit LAN ports. Those 4 LAN ports handle gigabit ethernet between the local network PCs, printer, etc connected to them.
Is your purpose to try to add to the discussion or just confuse everyone?
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The old Netgear routers used to be pretty decent. I had an RT318 for years before it finally died. Haven't been impressed at all with the newer ones - the build quality seems cheap (my old one had a heavy steel case, which admittedly is the exception rather than the rule now).
I have a Linksys WRT54GL now and love it - unlike the cheaper and far more common WRT54G, the GL supports third-party Linux-based firmware (I use DD-WRT, but OpenWRT and Tomato are also popular) that gives you far more control over every aspect of the router's operation. With a firmware upgrade, it's probably the closest you'll get in a consumer- grade router to functionality that's usually only present in commercial- grade ones. It's also rock-stable and reliable. However, it doesn't do wireless-n (only -b and -g) or gigabit.
Dave
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You know, someone ought to come up with a ng related to computers or networking or LAN's or something like that.
I think that would be nice.
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On 01/22/2011 09:07 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I know what you're saying, but they're all infested with people who are rude and unhelpful to non-techies.
nate
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On 1/22/2011 5:13 PM, Nate Nagel wrote:

There is a well-known Windows bug that has the same symptoms you're describing. Unfortunately, there's a number of potential fixes for the bug - sometimes replacing the router does the trick, or updating the network adapter drivers, or replacing the wireless card/adapter. It's been noted on HP and Dell machines that were originally built for Vista, but are running XP. In those cases it usually turned out to be a driver problem. The Winsock XP Fix utility works in a lot of cases to solve the problem (sometimes permanently, but not always). Sometimes tinkering with your network connection settings does the trick. I had it show up when I got a new laptop. I changed my laptop's power options so that the wireless adapter setting was at maximum performance. That turns off the 802.11 power save mode, which took care of it, which suggested the problem in my case was that the (old) router did not support the (newer) 802.11 power save protocol. Between that and the fact that routers are cheap, I decided to upgrade to a new wireless-n router. I like it - much better coverage in the back yard. The old router's signal outdoors was greatly attenuated due to my stucco (wire mesh) house with steel doors.
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On 01/24/2011 09:06 PM, Hell Toupee wrote:

Thanks for the post, but I did not specify my OS - my laptop is running Ubuntu 10.04 (Linux) good try, but...
nate
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GENERALLY when you get intermittent dropouts it is the router starting to die. D-Link is quite well known for that failure mode, and it is not uncommon with some early Netgear and Linksys stuff either. Not sure how the Netgear and Linksys N product is.My Metgear G died in just over a year - have had the AirLink N router over 2 years now, no problems (touch wood).
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Hi, Latest firmware? Tried dd-wrt? I am using Netgear WNDR3700 with dd-wrt firmware. First AC adapter came with the router is marginal. Replce it with better one. Heat is enemy, carefully drill some holes on the case to imrpove venting. I never experienced router dying on me by doing this two things. Currently my router is pretty busy serving network of more than half dozen various PC desktops, server, notebooks, iBook and WiFi printer. No problem.
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