OT: any good routers on the market?

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currently using a Netgear WNR3500 v2 and I think it's starting to die. this is the second Netgear I've had; the previous one bricked itself after about 2 years. This one is less than a year old and while it works fine on wired the wireless will drop its connection to the internet randomly throughout the day. It's not my laptop, we've got plenty of wireless devices throughout the house (other laptops, Wii, etc.) and all exhibit the same behavior. Oddly, disconnecting and reconnecting to the wireless connection will restore functionality... for a while. I updated firmware with only slight improvement. This just started maybe a week ago so I suspect that something is failing in it. I've also had a Linksys but was disappointed in that as well as I was never able to connect to it at greater than 54 MBPS.
So...
does anyone make a GOOD wireless/wired router? Would like wireless-n and gigabit.
thanks
nate
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I bought a NetGear. My second one, the first one died. Could not get #2 to work. Called their site for help. They said you must pay us for any help. Took it back to the dealer for a refund. Called my ISP and had them install what they used. Turns out it was a NetGear. However a much more expebsive one and it works fine. WW
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Nate Nagel wrote:

Freud makes a good router, but it's not wireless. Porter Cable would probably be my second choice.
Jon
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On Sat, 22 Jan 2011 15:26:23 -0800, "Jon Danniken"

Oh, good heavens, no. Never Freud. Festool is the way to go (lessee, a Bosch, 1-1/2 PC, a Ryobi, and a Festool). ;-)
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On 1/22/2011 6:13 PM, Nate Nagel wrote:

I called my IT buddy a couple days ago when I was buying a wireless router. He said don't get a junk one, and specifically mention Net Gear as being in the junk class.
I bought a D Link, and the previous D Link I have (different location) works fine.
The N is common these days, I did not need the Gigabit, so I don't know about it. Here I have a Netopia (forget who bought them) router/modem and like it. Don't know how fast it is but it rips along when I run SyncToy. Faster than my HD. YMMV.
Jeff
This one is less than a year old and while it works

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wrote:

I've been using a BEFSR41 for a few years, wired to 2 other home computers. No problems at all.
--Vic
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I've bought routers from both LinkSys and NetGear.
I never could figure out where to put the bits.
That said, I gotta admit they're a lot quieter than my Porter Cable.
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Great, now I'm gonna have the image of someone trying to make door moulding using a Linksys 802.11B.
To stay OT: the best bang for your wireless buck is to get a router compatible with Tomato (http://www.polarcloud.com/tomato ). It's an AMAZING firmware to run your wireless network, much more robust and much more stable than what the manufacturers create.
We use it at the church to daisy-chain three routers to cover the facility with a seamless 802.11g signal.
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I've had two Linksys. First one lasted probably 4 year or so before it just went dead. I have a Linksys DI-624 G one now, probably 3 years. Two weeks ago, the power supply wall wart died. It runs on 5V, so I temporarily hooked it up to my PC power supply until I got a new wall wart for $6 on Ebay. Overall, for the price/value/performance, I've been happy with Dlink.
Just bought a refurbished Netgear WNR2000 on Ebay and turned it into a wireless bridge for my Tivo. Essentially, I got a 5 port wireless bridge for $25. If you tried to buy a wireless bridge, even one port ones are more like $100. To make it into the WB, I used DD-WRT software, which is kind of like the Tomato software reference above.
So, now I have the Netgear on the first floor at one far end on the house talking to the Dlink on the second floor at the other far end.
Some thoughts on other issues:
Gigabit Ethernet: I don't see the need in typical home environment. The cable connection into my house is only 15Mbit, claimed, 12Mbit max I measured. Cablevision offers 2X that if you pay extra. So, clearly gigabit isn't going to do anything more for internet access. Even if you're moving some video files from one storage to another within the house, 100Mbit seems adequate to me, unless you're doing a lot of that within the house.
Wireless N: Same thing. If you're streaming video off the internet over a 15Mbit connection, don't see the need for N, when G is already capable of 54Mbit. Another feature that's touted for N is dual band. I guess the new 5Ghz band is supposed to be better because there is less likely to be interference from cordless phones, other G networks, etc. But the big drawback is the range is not nearly as far as you get with G.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:
[snip]

And even if you do (need gigabit internally), you need one or more gigabit SWITCHES. The router is involved only for internet communication. Most aren't fast enough for gigabit.
[snip]
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Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us
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On 01/24/2011 08:37 PM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

most wireless routers have a 4- or 8-port switch built into them, unless I'm misunderstanding how these things work. Last time I really had a home network up and running, transferring files between PCs was noticeably faster on a (gigabit) ethernet connection than wirelessly. Of course that router was the "wireless-n" Linksys that I could never connect to at any speed above wireless-g speed.
nate
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Nate Nagel wrote:

Yes, there is a switch built-in. On mine (Linksys WRT54GS) it appears to be a 6-port switch. It has only 4 LAN ports on the outside, but consider 2 internal ports: one connects to the router and the other connects to the wireless access point.

Yes. This is true even if stated wireless speed it high. It is shared between all wireless devices on your network as well as any other networks on that wireless channel. Also, the wireless connection is half-duplex (only one direction at a time).

Most of my network is 100Mbit, with just one gigabit switch. 3 of my computers have gigabit capability, and are connected to that switch.
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On Mon, 24 Jan 2011 19:37:39 -0600, Mark Lloyd

I have sold and installed dozens of "gigabit routers" - routers with 4 or 8 port gigabit switch built in.Linksys makes them (division of CISCO - not my gavourite) as does Airlink and D-Link and Netgear.
MOST with Wireless 802-11N are also gigabit today.
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On Jan 24, 9:45pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Agree. Pretty much all the routers targeted for home, small office come with at least 4 ethernet ports built in. For obvious reasons. IF you can get one that way for $75, who would buy one that did not.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Those ports are part of the built-in SWITCH, not the ROUTER. These can, and do, have different speed capabilities. There's usually also a WiFi access point in that box.
Avoiding such confusion has advantages.

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Mark Lloyd
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On Wed, 26 Jan 2011 20:30:01 -0600, Mark Lloyd

I have not seen one in several years, so your point is moot.
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On 1/26/2011 10:02 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Chuckle. A year ago, I was tearing my hair out trying to get a Linksys blue-box router ($2 at a garage sale) working behind my father's Ma Bell Issue Motorola DSL modem. The 'official' instructions about 'bridging' did not work. I finally found a writeup in a forum that explained why- the DSL modem was a single-port router. Once I changed the Linksys to use a different IP, it all worked fine.
(Yes, I know I'm probably using the wrong terms- an IP/LAN geek I'm not.)
--
aem sends...

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funny thing is that after OCD style searching online (with much disconnecting and reconnecting required, making it take way longer than it should have) the "blue box" linksys was the ONLY home router that got 5 egg ratings on newegg. NONE of the wireless-N ones or ones with gigabit switches (yes, I know the difference between a switch and a router, but whoever said "show me a home router without a switch" was absolutely correct, and I was not being precise in that respect) and all of them had reviews with a consistent theme - short lifespan, flaky wireless, etc. In short, the same problems I've been having with all the routers I've owned.
I went ahead and ordered a "blue box" Linksys as they are still available for about $50. I know I won't be satisfied with it, but I can always drag it out whenever the good one dies.
nate
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On 01/27/2011 09:26 AM, N8N wrote:

Looks like it was in fact the wireless router that was dying... "blue box" showed up today - WRT54GL - and in a bout of insomnia I went ahead and configured it and then hooked it up to the router by the cable modem (don't ask, I didn't set it up.)
connection to the interwebs is noticeably faster, despite the "blue box" being a/g only. Will leave laptop running and see if it is still connected when I wake up in AM (will leave IM client running - with Netgear it would show disconnected after a couple hours.)
So I guess that makes me want to change my question - are there any good wireless-n routers on the market? preferably with gigabit switches? or are they all pretty much unreliable crap? (I suspect the latter, frankly, at least if we're talking consumer-grade equipment. Have to get one of those "wireless access points" like they use in the hallways of hotels and a real rack mount gigabit switch for something to last more than a couple of years? but that is expensive...)
nate
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On 1/29/2011 2:41 AM, Nate Nagel wrote:

You can pick up a refurbished commercial unit from any one of several suppliers and it will look like a consumer grade box but the security features will be enhanced and it may stand up to 24/7 operation a lot better. For example:
http://www.geeks.com/products_sc.asp?catd8
http://preview.tinyurl.com/685x9xk
I keep an eye out for these because you can load your own Linux based software into them:
http://preview.tinyurl.com/4gq566h
TDD
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